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Posts Tagged ‘Enumclaw’

Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, October 24, 1963

Crystal MountainThe new Crystal Mountain winter sports area is readying for its first full season of operation according to Melvin Borgersen, manager of Crystal Mountain, Inc., developers of the project. Although Crystal Mountain operated last winter it did so only on a limited basis due to the fact that the 1962-1963 season was used by the operators as a “shake down” period.

Borgersen reported this week that the state’s newest skiing facility, which is located approximately 38 miles northeast of Enumclaw in the Silver Creek region, has undergone vast changes during the summer and fall. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier, October 20, 1911

Selleck HotelThe Pacific States Lumber Company at Selleck has just completed a fine modern hotel, which is to be formally opened with a grand ball and oyster supper on Saturday evening, October 21, under the auspices of the Selleck Band.

For the convenience of people from Enumclaw and other points trains will leave Selleck after the ball at 12:30 and at 2:00 a.m.

A cordial invitation is extended to all, and a good number in attendance from Enumclaw would be most gratifying to the people of Selleck.

The new hotel is a modern, three-story structure, and would do credit to a town many times the size of Selleck.

It has a capacity of sixty rooms, and is finished in slash grain fir beautifully stained, the rooms being neatly furnished.

The building is steam heated throughout, and has toilets and shower-baths on the two lower floors.

The lobby is large and roomy, and the dining hall has a seating capacity of about two hundred and fifty.

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, September 12, 1962

The citizens of Cumberland several months ago leased the gymnasium of the Cumberland grade school which had been abandoned, and have converted the gym to a fire hall.

The citizens of Cumberland leased the gymnasium of the Cumberland grade school which had been abandoned, and have converted the gym to a fire hall.

The town of Cumberland, seven miles northeast of Enumclaw, will hold an open house marking the opening of its new fire hall next Sunday, September 15, according to Frank Pigott, one of the three commissioners for King County Fire District No 28.

Pigott who was named to the post on the three-member board made vacant by the recent death of Ira Baker, who was for fifteen years chief of the Angle Lake Fire Department before moving to the Veazie district near Enumclaw recently. (more…)

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The new Black Diamond Elementary School, September 1963

The “new” Black Diamond Elementary School, September 1963

Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, September 5, 1963

Black Diamond students are occupying a brand new elementary school building as they come back and settle down to books after the three months’ summer vacation.

Fred Pettersen, school principal said that he anticipates an enrollment of approximately 220 pupils this year as compared with slightly more than 200 last year.

The new building was begun in July 1962 and was completed in time for occupancy this year. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Herald, August 2, 1929

Pacific States Lumber Co. plant, Selleck, Washington. This elevated view of the large, sprawling facility was taken on October 4, 1926. Photo courtesy of Tacoma Public Library.

Pacific States Lumber Co. plant, Selleck, Washington. This elevated view of the large, sprawling facility was taken on October 4, 1926. Photo courtesy of Tacoma Public Library.

Fire of undetermined origin which threatened for a time to destroy the mill and entire town of Selleck was halted early Monday [July 29] morning after a stubborn fight made by firemen from the surrounding towns. The loss was estimated at approximately $350,000. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-intelligencer, July 3, 1977

By Judi Hunt

Black Diamond BakeryBlack Diamond is a “never on Monday or Tuesday” kind of town. Those are the days that the former mining community’s main attractions—the bakery, cheese and sausage shop, art gallery and potter-in-residence—are closed.

There’s more to Black Diamond than those favorites of out-of-towners, of course. Two of the town’s three taverns seem to do as lively a business at the beginning of the week as at the end.

And so do the drug, liquor and grocery stores in the small shopping center on the Maple Valley Highway which links this sleepy little haven to the rest of south King County.

But what brings the visitors to Black Diamond—southeast of Renton and east of Auburn—is bread.

Not just any kind of bread, but the very special variety that tantalizes all the senses and which apparently can only be made in a wood-fired brick oven like the one at the Black Diamond Bakery. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, March 14, 1971

By Byron Johnsrud

This is another in the continuing series on communities in and around the Seattle area. Byron Johnsrud and Walt Woodward alternate as authors.

Evan Thomas and his Welsh heirlooms.

Evan Thomas and his Welsh heirlooms.

THE LATE Erie Stanley Gardner might have titled it “The Case of the Lively Ghost Town.”

Certainly any town that boasts only two industries, and one of them a bakery, might be suspected of a galloping case of civic senility.

Not so Black Diamond, the little South King County hamlet that certainly must be one of the few incorporated entities anywhere without a single stop-and-go light to stay the tourist hurrying to scenes of livelier action.

Black Diamond has only one “tourist trap,” the second of the two aforementioned industries. It is known afar and favorably as The Bakery. It has to be listed as an “industry” because it lures in money from the greater “outside.” (more…)

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