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Posts Tagged ‘Enumclaw’

Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, March 28, 1963

Cumberland firehouse

The Cumberland firehouse was the former gymnasium.

Cumberland, the unincorporated town eight miles northeast of Enumclaw, hopes to have fire protection in the very near future if current plans are successfully concluded, according to Emmett Gleason, Cumberland businessman and one of a committee of five citizens named to spearhead the movement. For several years, Gleason said, Cumberland has been an “orphan” insofar as its incorporation into a rural fire district has been concerned.

According to the boundary lines of surrounding fire districts, the Enumclaw fire department could only go to a point two miles south of the “orphan,” the Palmer-Selleck fire district equipment was drawn to a halt one and one-half miles north of the town, and the Black Diamond firefighters, as far as legality was concerned, had to come to a grinding stop when they reached a point four miles west of Cumberland. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, March 12, 1953

Standing in front of the Black Diamond fire station is Garrett (left) and Tommy Zumek, Black Diamond fire chief. The people of Black Diamond have expressed their appreciation in receiving the gift of this truck. Garrett has been made an honorary fire chief. (C-H Photo & Engraving)

Standing in front of the Black Diamond fire station is Dwight Garrett (left) and Tommy Zumek, Black Diamond fire chief. (C-H Photo & Engraving)

“Old Soldiers Never Die,” or so the song goes. Well, that almost holds good for old fire trucks, too.

Pictured above is the LaFrance fire truck that served Enumclaw for quite a number of years. A call for bids to sell it brought an offer from Dwight Garrett—who we understand was born in Black Diamond, but now is an Enumclaw businessman.

His offer was accepted and he presented it to the City of Black Diamond.

The people of Black Diamond have expressed their appreciation in receiving the gift of this truck. Garrett has been made an honorary fire chief.

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Originally published in the BDHS newsletter, November 1992

By Victor Evans

Black Diamond Bakery ovenI was born in Black Diamond in 1916. It’s kind of unusual. I was born in the bakery where my father was a baker. Being a twin, they thought I was rather puny although I weighed five pounds. To keep me warm—there were no incubators available—they laid me down near the baking oven. That old baking oven served as my incubator. I used to crawl around picking up raisins that fell on the floor.

My twin brother Vincent and I were one of the attractions at the bakery. There was another set of twins born in Black Diamond fairly close to when we were born, but they were not identical twins. It used to keep my mother busy keeping us dressed up and all in shape for all the people coming in to see us. She said it was a real headache. We were on display all the time. (more…)

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Originally published in the Globe News, July 4, 1976

By Nancy Gould

Bushes and crocuses gone wild provide nature’s remembrances to those forgotten decades ago in Black Diamond’s cemetery. The town’s historic site is currently the focus of the town council’s attention to determine how best to preserve and maintain it.

Bushes and crocuses gone wild provide nature’s remembrances to those forgotten decades ago in Black Diamond’s cemetery. The town’s historic site is the focus of the town council’s attention to determine how best to preserve and maintain it.

“Pennacchi, Menechini, Daverio,” read some of the Italian names on tombstones in Black Diamond’s 3.4-acre cemetery off Morgan Drive. Purple heather from James Williams’ Welsh homeland nearly covers his 1890 marker.

Patches of graves bear similar dates in the late 1800s and early 1900s when Welsh, Polish, Austrian and other ethnic miners lost their lives in local mining accidents.

One discolored stone’s name and date are indecipherable but the epitaph is clear: “Gone but not forgotten.”

The old cemetery has become the recent focus of attention from town fathers, hoping to uphold the promise behind that inscription. A small group of volunteer caretakers has requested that the town of Black Diamond take over the care and maintenance of the cemetery.

But for three years, said Dan Farr, town attorney, the issue has been under advisement.

“There has been a movement for the town to pick up the cemetery, but we discovered there was an old lien on the property. The Pacific Coast Coal Company’s predecessor left an unpaid mortgage which clouds the title.” (more…)

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Efforts of 200 mill men prove futile in quelling disaster

Originally published in the Enumclaw Herald, on January 3, 1930

Selleck School, pre-1929

The current Selleck School, which now serves as the Pacific States Condominiums, was built in 1930 on the same site as the old school.

Fire, which is thought to have originated in the furnace, completely demolished the Selleck grade school Tuesday afternoon, destroying textbooks, gymnasium equipment and desks. Only a piano, an electric stove and a few books were saved from the flames. The loss is estimated at $14,000. The building was a frame structure of seven rooms, accommodating more than 100 pupils. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, November 15, 1962

The Exhibit Hall was moved to Enumclaw after the 1962 Seattle World's Fair.

The Exhibit Hall was moved to Enumclaw after the 1962 Seattle World’s Fair.

The warmly-remembered Seattle World’s Fair will become more than just a memory to Enumclaw residents in the near future. South District County Commissioner Ed Munro told the Courier-Herald this week that the county park department has purchased three buildings from the Fair Corporation for use at the Enumclaw Recreation Park.

A fourth building has been purchased for use at the Ravensdale park, and there is a distinct possibility that the building that once housed the Swedish exhibit will be obtained for Enumclaw. (more…)

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Originally published in the BDHS newsletter, May 1989

By Ann Steiert

Almost everyone of us at one time or another have commented on the way the traffic in our area has grown. It’s hard to imagine a world without the cars and roads that are so common in this day. This has led to a reflection on how it was in the days when the first settlers came to Washington Territory. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-intelligencer, June 29, 1992

When the Black Diamond Coal Co. built this town in the 1880s and began mining the bituminous wealth below, Seattle was four hours away by train, and there wasn’t much in between.

Today, most of that area has been developed into suburban South King County. The meandering railroad is gone, replaced by an often-crowded highway network.

This historic community of 1,500 people, with many of its original mining company homes still intact, is now flanked by modern housing subdivisions. Mayor Howard Botts notes with a grin that the city is about to get its first espresso outlet.

Urban pressures in one form or another are being felt by the county’s rural cities from Duvall to Black Diamond and Enumclaw. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, June 14, 1935

New coal vein opened by operator at Bayne

Operation of development is under way

Almost inexhaustible supply is disclosed by examinations

The superstructure above the shaft and the automatic dumping device on the tipple was designed and constructed by John A. Stonebridge, foreman for Mr. Bolde.

The superstructure above the shaft and the automatic dumping device on the tipple was designed and constructed by John A. Stonebridge, foreman for Mr. Bolde.

According to local mine experts, one of most valuable coal veins ever to be opened up in this region has been recently uncovered at Bayne by Jim Bolde, operator of the Carbon Fuel Company mines. Although that property has been producing high grades of coal for many years, the vein now being worked is entirely new and its outcropping was located in a dense forest almost a mile from the other workings. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier, September 30, 1910

St. Barbara dedicationOn Sunday, Oct. 23d. will be dedicated the new church edifice at Black Diamond, called St. Barbara. The ceremony will be performed by Rev. Bishop Edward J. O’Dea, of the diocese of Seattle, and will take place at 10 o’clock, a.m. The event will be of great interest to the people of Black Diamond, and to those of the Catholic faith throughout the surrounding territory. The weather being favorable, there will doubtless be the greatest gathering ever witnessed at Black Diamond. After the ceremony dinner will be served by the Ladies Aid Society, to which everybody will be welcome.

The new church, with which there is no fault found yet so far as construction is concerned, is almost exclusively the work of Enumclaw firms. Ival Parks is the contractor, the lumber was furnished by the White River Lumber Co., and Alex Gillessen did the painting. He has painted some very fine pieces for the interior decoration, which may be seen at his shop at the corner of Wells Street and Initial Avenue. Everything included, the cost of the new edifice will be a little over $2,200.

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