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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, February 20, 1889

Morgan Morgans, superintendent of the Black Diamond Coal Mining Co.

Morgan Morgans, superintendent of the Black Diamond Coal Mining Co.

The fire which broke out in section 14 of the Black Diamond mine on January 2 has at last been extinguished, through the efforts of Morgan Morgans, the superintendent of the mine, and the casual observer on entering section 14 would not be able to discover that there ever had been fire there.

The cave which occurred in section 14, in the latter part of December has been entirely cleaned up. Superintendent Morgans, in order to furnish an escape in case of accident to his miners, has run a shaft 18 feet in diameter and 254 feet in length from the lower level to the upper level.

This shaft was dug by Mr. Morgans in the incredibly short space of eleven days. Besides giving the miners a means of egress in case of danger, the shaft gives them good, pure air.

The Black Diamond mine is now in better running order than it has been in for some time. About 1,000 tons are being taken out daily, and vessels enough cannot be had to carry the coal away from this port.

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, February 19, 1923

Explosion caused by firing shot in colliery

Carbon Hill Coal Company’s mine at Carbonado, ca. 1915

Carbon Hill Coal Company’s mine at Carbonado, ca. 1915

Twenty-eight men in workings at time of accident and all are more or less affected by detonation

Three men were killed, one severely injured, three gassed, and property badly damaged by an explosion in the Carbon Hill Coal Company’s mine at Carbonado Saturday night. The explosion occurred just after a shot had been fired.

The dead are: Fred Fort, fire boss, 34, married; W.A. Minson, 39, miner, married; and H.S. Bissell, miner, 24, unmarried.

N. Badnick, a miner, suffered broken ribs and internal injuries and bruises.

Leonard Bone, E. Bronson, and S. Jackson, all miners, were gassed but are reported recovering. Continue Reading »

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, February 17, 2015

By Bill Kombol

A massive slide almost wiped out the city’s bridge and water supply.

A massive slide almost wiped out the city’s bridge and water supply.

Sometime after the closing of the Cannon Mine in 1922, its bridge over the Green River was repurposed to carry piped water to the town of Black Diamond’s water supply facilities.

This photo dates to the late 1940s or early 1950s and shows the Cannon mine bridge supporting the water pipeline in the lower right.

This view is looking east across the Green River to below where the city’s springs pour forth subsurface water.

A massive slide almost wiped out the city’s bridge and water supply as can be seen in the aftermath in this photo. Continue Reading »

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, February 3, 2015

By Bill Kombol

The Cannon mine, ca. 1915, was named for an executive with Pacific Coast Co. It began operations in 1913 and closed in 1922.

The Cannon mine, ca. 1915, was named for an executive with Pacific Coast Co. It began operations in 1913 and closed in 1922.

The Cannon mine in Franklin operated on the Gem and McKay coal seams, both lying on the east side of Green River. In 1914 the Cannon mine was connected by a 1,225-foot rock tunnel to the Franklin Gem and all the coal was processed in joint facilities.

While the coal processing facilities and the railroad were all on the west side of the river, the Cannon mine was on the east side. Hence, this bridge across Green River was constructed to bring coal out of the mine, cross the river, and then hoisted up an incline to coal bunkers near the Columbia & Puget Sound railroad. Continue Reading »

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, March 2, 2010

Cannon Mine coal bunkers in the coal mining town of Franklin, as it nears completion around 1912-13.

Cannon Mine coal bunkers in the coal mining town of Franklin, as it nears completion around 1912-13.

By Bill Kombol

The Cannon mine was named in honor of Henry W. Cannon, a former president of Pacific Coast Company who served as chairman of the board of directors. Driving the gangway for the Cannon mine commenced on the Gem coal seam in 1910, about the same time that this new bunker with all modern equipment was first conceived.

Franklin was a coal mining town situated above the Green River Gorge where coal was first discovered by Victor Tull in July 1880 and coal shipments commenced in July 1883.

This image comes from the Pacific Coast Company collection, photo No. 41 and is also known as Museum of History and Industry (MOHAI) No. 19182.

Originally published in The Seattle Times, February 16, 1983

By Herb Belanger
Times suburban reporter

An aerial view of the Black Diamond Museum, ca. 2005. The building was constructed in 1885-1886 as a train depot. Next to it is the only jail Black Diamond has ever had. (BDHS calendar series, 2009.)

An aerial view of the Black Diamond Museum, ca. 2005. The building was constructed in 1885-1886 as a train depot. Next to it is the only jail Black Diamond has ever had. (BDHS calendar series, 2009.)

Six buildings of historical value in King County may be in line for a $65,000 grant for restoration work.

The county Landmarks Commission recently made the recommendation; it needs an OK from the County Council.

The money would benefit the old former Snoqualmie Falls Electric Co. substation in Renton, $10,000; Company House 75 also in Renton, $6,500; the Bothell Historical Museum, $2,800; the Black Diamond railroad depot, $6,000; Hotel Skykomish in Skykomish, $25,000, and the Carnegie Library in Auburn, $15,000. Continue Reading »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, February 15, 1923

issaquah-snowThough snow covers the tracks over which the mine cars carry their burden of coal to the bunkers, the wintry blasts and zero temperature are not noticed by the men on shift in the gangways and chutes. But for the boys in the bunkers it’s a different story and the green grass would look much better to them. Continue Reading »