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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, November 27, 1915

State will call them together to consider methods of meeting pension claims due to mine disaster

OLYMPIA, Saturday, Nov. 27. — Within the next few weeks, the Industrial Insurance Commission will call a meeting of all coal operators to decide upon methods to be followed in raising sufficient revenues to meet pensions necessitated by the Ravensdale mine disaster.

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, November 26, 1915

More than fifty witnesses to be called; cause of explosion not yet determined

More than fifty witnesses will be called at the inquest over the thirty-one miners and workmen who lost their lives in the explosion in the Northwest Improvement Company’s mine at Ravensdale, according to an announcement made by Coroner Dr. J. Tate Mason. The inquest will be held Wednesday.

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, November 23, 1915

Thought practically impossible to make place safe—Coroner’s jury will go into chutes tomorrow

RAVENSDALE, Tuesday, Nov. 23. — While General Manager C.C. Anderson of the Northwestern Improvement Company’s coal mine, in which thirty-one miners were killed last week in an explosion, will neither confirm nor deny the report, a rumor gained considerable credence here yesterday that the mine would be closed permanently at an early date.

This action would be taken, it was said, on account of the danger that is always present when miners are working in it, and the impossibility of making the mine completely safe.

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, November 22, 1942

After a year of back-breaking work on the coal mine he and two other miners started near Black Diamond, things were beginning to look good for Dan Carey and his family.

Carey didn’t expect any of his crew to work any harder than he did. Or take as many risks.

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, November 22, 1915

County officials arrive to investigate mine explosion in which thirty-one died—All victims recovered

RAVENSDALE, Monday, Nov. 22. – Dr. J. Tate Mason, King County coroner; Frank Koepfil, deputy coroner; King County Prosecutor A.H. Lundin, and F.P. Helsell, deputy, arrived here this morning to investigate the cause of the explosion that occurred in the Northwest Improvement Company’s coal mine last Tuesday and caused the death of thirty-one men. George H. Rummens, who has been retained as attorney for the miners, also was a member of the party.

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, November 21, 1915

Newspaper man visits levels where men lost lives in Northwest Improvement Company’s colliery

Interior of working scene of destruction

By J.J. Underwood

I met Joe Brunni, miner, as I walked up the slippery hill to the slope of the Ravensdale mine. His hand was wrapped in a towel. A chunk of coal had dropped on it, and it was badly mangled.

“She’s not hurt so much,” he said. “I get her fixed up and go down again. The mine’s cavin’ pretty bad in some places.” Joe’s injury had been received down the slope of the coal mine at Ravensdale, where fifteen men still lay buried in the debris, and forty or fifty more men were working like beavers in the murk and gloom and gas and grime, trying to find them.

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, November 21, 1915

Workers go hours and days without sleep

Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Garnes, of Ravensdale Hotel, who remained on duty for hours preparing food for members of mine rescue crews who toiled in depths of mine where workers lost their lives.

In the events following the disaster at Ravensdale last Tuesday many have enrolled their names in the ranks of the heroes.

Working desperately through mud and grime, crawling through cracks in the black coal pits, more than a quarter of a mile below the surface of the earth, and often going without sleep for protracted periods, scores of men have shown themselves to be the salt of the earth. And they did these things without hope or expectation of reward.

It was a hopeless task in which they were engaged, for they knew full well that none of the thirty-one men left in the mine a few hours after the explosion could be left alive, and yet they hoped against hope, and toiled on. They thought that, perhaps, one might have escaped the violent concussion that shook earth—the maybe one or more would survive if reached in time.

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, November 20, 1915

Seventeen in all recovered from Ravensdale workings, scene of explosion, and fourteen still underground

RAVENSDALE, Saturday, Nov. 20. — With the finding at noon today of two additional bodies of victims of the explosion Tuesday afternoon in the Northwestern Improvement Company mine, and of two early this morning, a total of seventeen have been recovered from the workings. Those found today were Jack Storey, Frank Wegher, Joe Baldacci, and Romeo Medaine.

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, November 19, 1915

List of those recovered now totals fifteen, and hope is expressed of obtaining remaining sixteen before night—Disaster thought due to improperly-tamped dynamite

RAVENSDALE, Friday, Nov. 19. — Bodies of six more victims of the explosion that wrecked the lower workings of the Northwest Improvement Company’s coal mine here last Tuesday afternoon were brought from the slope at daybreak. Nine other bodies previously had been taken from the mine.

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, November 18, 1915

Breaking of pump makes further progress into Ravensdale chamber perilous—Of thirty-three workers three escaped, nine bodies recovered and hopes for remaining twenty-one fade—Official inquiry waits end of rescuers’ task

By J.J. Underwood

RAVENSDALE, Thursday, Nov 18. — With nine bodies recovered and twenty-one men still in the lower level and believed to be dead, a new danger is faced by the rescue parties working in the Northwest Improvement Company’s coal mine at Ravensdale, the scene of an explosion Tuesday afternoon.

The peril is rising water, and until the wrecked pump in the main slope can be repaired it will not be safe to penetrate farther into the chamber where the victims are held.

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