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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, February 13, 1891

Kinnear’s Anti-Detective bill passed by Senate: Armed guards not needed

Olympia, Feb. 12—[Special.]—The anti-Pinkerton bill, which a year since aroused so much feeling and bitter opposition in the legislature, went through the Senate today without a dissenting vote, and miners and other workingmen will begin to think that this legislature takes a genuine interest in protecting them from these very obnoxious agents of moneyed power.

The Kinnear bill, passed today, makes it unlawful for any corporation or individual to maintain or employ an armed body of men to protect their property or employees. Continue Reading »

Originally published in the Valley Daily News, February 8, 1993

Photo courtesy of Black Diamond Museum

Photo courtesy of Black Diamond Museum

Black Diamond got its name from the Black Diamond Mining Company of Nortonville, Calif., which in 1880 was looking for high-quality coal for its customers.

The company found Valley-area coal to be soft and low in sulphur, so tent towns were pitched and Black Diamond became king of the coal industry. Continue Reading »

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, November 13, 2007

By Bill Kombol

Three boys sit on the locomotive’s pilot, while several men and boys stand on the railroad track.

In the early days of coal mining, almost all of the coal was transported to market by railroads. This coal-fired steam engine would have been a familiar sight to those living in the coal mining towns and camps, as well as the dock workers where much of the coal was re-loaded on ships. Continue Reading »

J.M. Sims

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, February 8, 1922

JM SimsA welcome caller last week was J.M. Sims, superintendent of the Pacific Coast Railway. This road is in California, and is a subsidiary of the Pacific Coast Company, as is The Pacific Coast Coal Company.

Mr. Sims is one of the interesting personalities of The Pacific Coast Company. Sure sign that he is held in affection and esteem, his stories are constantly being retold, and his personal experiences recounted in the friendly manner that attests personal popularity.

Being in Seattle on business, he dropped into “ye editorial sanctum” in the course of his rounds of the general offices.

He was greeted with enthusiasm. In point of service Mr. Sims has earned the right to be classed among the veterans—although still as active as a stripling. Beginning in Illinois at the age of 16 as a telegraph operator, he has remained in railroad service for more than forty years, joining the Pacific Coast Company twenty years ago.

Call again, Mr. Sims.

Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, February 8, 1989

Shivering communities band together to battle fire and ice

Dennis Blake at the Cumberland Grocery Store said his community was without power for about 24 hours and water lines were frozen. “We’re having all kinds of fun up here,” Blake laughed. “We stayed good and warm in the store with a fireplace insert.” The store had just received a large shipment of bread and milk, and Blake wasn’t worried about running out of those staples.

Dennis Blake at the Cumberland Grocery Store said his community was without power for about 24 hours and water lines were frozen. “We’re having all kinds of fun up here,” Blake laughed. “We stayed good and warm in the store with a fireplace insert.” The store had just received a large shipment of bread and milk, and Blake wasn’t worried about running out of those staples.

Residents of Cumberland were among the hardest hit by last week’s storm. Fallen trees knocked out power lines and most of the small town was without power and water for more than a day, said assistant fire chief Neil Utterwegner.

Power went out about 6:30 Thursday night and wasn’t restored until midnight Friday, Utterwegner said. With no power, the city’s water tank couldn’t fill and went dry early Friday morning.

Utterwegner said the town, eight miles north of Enumclaw, was more prepared for a storm after learning some things from its experience in 1983.

“I think everything we’ve done reflects back to then.” he said. “We’re kind of getting to where we know what to do.” Continue Reading »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, February 8, 1922

By Geo. Watkin Evans, consulting coal mining engineer, Seattle

Pacific Coast Coal Co. Logo 1922For the purpose of this paper, the Cedar River coal area will include the coal mines and coal beds discovered and developed at Renton and vicinity, and also at Cedar Mountain. These two areas are properly within the Cedar River watershed.

Renton district

As stated in a previous paper, coal was found on Black River in the vicinity of Renton in 1853 by Dr. M. Bigelow. A small mine was opened and coal was shipped by boat down Black River, then along the Duwamish River to Seattle, but in 1855 an Indian outbreak occurred in which two of the men interested in the project were killed, and the mine was abandoned. Continue Reading »

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, February 7, 1973

By Laura Lorenz

The South Maple Valley interchange of State Highway 18 is about one-third done, but an erosion problem has brought the one-million-dollar, eighteen-acre project to a standstill. The white spots in the picture are plastic sheetings being used to check the erosion. (Staff photo by Lowell Lorenz)

The South Maple Valley interchange of State Highway 18 is about one-third done, but an erosion problem has brought the one-million-dollar, eighteen-acre project to a standstill. The white spots in the picture are plastic sheetings being used to check the erosion. (Staff photo by Lowell Lorenz)

The South Maple Valley Interchange of State Highway 18, located at SE 232 and King County Highway 169, is expected to be in use by early summer, according to project engineer Dave Jolly. Continue Reading »

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