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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 26, 1923

On the front cover of the Pacific Coast Bulletin this week is reproduced a remarkable photograph of a man trip, just as it starts down the slope of Black Diamond Mine with a crew going on the graveyard shift. Continue Reading »

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, April 25, 1929

Sixty-six years ago next fall “Ed” Henderson sighted an imaginary line across the foothills of the Cascade Mountains which revealed one of the cornerstones of community and industrial progress in the Pacific Northwest. Engaged in surveying, he became the discoverer of an extensive coal field from the various developments of which millions of tons of coal have been poured into the uses of commerce during the last half-century.

The only commercial coal produced in the Pacific States is mined within a radius of seventy miles from this discovery, and therefore it commands an extensive market. Next to lumber it is the most enriching natural wealth of the region, the annual output being normally about 2,500,000 tons. Continue Reading »

Originally published in Seattle Daily Times, April 25, 1953

By Robert A. Barr

Safe at last: The two survivors of a C-46 plane crash near Cedar Lake early Thursday, James. P. Gilbert, standing, and John W. Schroeder, talked over their experience after being rescued and taken to Virginia Mason Hospital late yesterday. Though still weary and unshaven, the two men were in cheerful spirits and happy over their rescue. Neither was injured seriously. The two other men aboard the plane died in the crash. —Times staff photo by Larry Dion.

Safe at last: The two survivors of a C-46 plane crash near Cedar Lake early Thursday, James. P. Gilbert, standing, and John W. Schroeder, talked over their experience after being rescued and taken to Virginia Mason Hospital late yesterday. Though still weary and unshaven, the two men were in cheerful spirits and happy over their rescue. Neither was injured seriously. The two other men aboard the plane died in the crash. —Times staff photo by Larry Dion.

Only about 40 feet of altitude stood between a C-46 transport plane that crashed on a forested mountain ridge in the Cedar River watershed about 1 o’clock Thursday morning, and a safe landing at Seattle.

This was the estimate of lumberjacks from the Mountain Tree Farm Lumber Co. who carried out the two survivors, James Gilbert, 24, Miami, and John W. Schroeder, 34, Coral. Cables, Fla. Both are pilots who were “dead-heading” to Seattle as passengers.

The plane hit the tops of trees on the crest of a slight saddle in the ridge at the 4,500-foot level, shearing off its wings and the horizontal stabilizers the tail section. The fuselage then plunged about 400 feet down the mountainside.

Had the plane missed the ridge, it probably would have had clear flight on to Boeing Field, rescuers said.

The forward section of the 40-passenger transport, in which, the pilot, Maurice A. Booska, and the co-pilot, Donald F. Dwelley, both of Miami, were riding, was smashed as the fuselage slid down the mountainside, striking trees 30 inches in diameter. Both were killed.

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, April 24, 1953

Crash sites: Cross at left designates where the wreckage of a C-46 transport plane was sighted today, less than a mile from the site of the April 14 crash (right cross) of a DC-3 in which six died and 19 survived. The area is near Cedar Lake in South Central King County. Four crew members were aboard the C-46. Two survivors were rescued.

Crash sites: Cross at left designates where the wreckage of a C-46 transport plane was sighted today, less than a mile from the site of the April 14 crash (right cross) of a DC-3 in which six died and 19 survived. The area is near Cedar Lake in South Central King County. Four crew members were aboard the C-46. Two survivors were rescued.

Searchers today found the wreckage and two survivors of a C-46 transport that crashed early yesterday on a 4,200-foot ridge, less than a mile from where a DC-3 struck the Cascades foothills April 14. Two other men aboard the C-46 were dead.

The wreckage of the twin-engined, 40-passenger plane lay in timber on the snowy slopes of the ridge, a mile southwest of Cedar Lake in the Cedar River watershed of South Central King County. Continue Reading »

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, April 23, 1953

Troop ferry last heard over Easton

A Seattle-bound nonscheduled C-46 airliner vanished over the Stampede Pass area of the Cascades early today. The plane carried four men.

The two-engine American Air Transport, Inc., plane sent its last message over Easton, on the east slope of the Cascades, at 12:47 o’clock. The pilot reported everything was normal. The plane was due at Boeing Field at 1:05. Continue Reading »

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, April 23, 1986

A recent photo of one of the trails at Franklin.

A recent photo of one of the trails at Franklin.

Employees of Seattle-based Recreational Equipment Inc., recently chose the old Franklin area of Black Diamond as the site of their annual service project for 1986.

Mail order division employees, 34 strong, arrived in Black Diamond Saturday, April 5 with equipment necessary to work on trails in what was the bustling coal mining community of Franklin at the turn of the century.

Assisting Recreational Equipment, or REI, workers were Carl Steiert, Don Mason, Robert Eaton, and Ted Barner, all members of the Black Diamond Historical Society. Continue Reading »

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, April 21, 1913

franklin-fire-1913
Loss estimated at $15,000 when store, depot, warehouse and number of dwellings are destroyed

A disastrous fire which started in the general store of the Pacific Coast Coal Company at Franklin, at the terminus of the Columbia & Puget Sound railway, destroyed the store and contents and swept away the railway station, the store’s warehouse and five dwellings occupied by miners’ families at 11 o’clock last night. The loss is $15,000. Continue Reading »