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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, August 1, 1973

Sherri Hosmun selling goodies to David Kero and Scott Young. (Picture courtesy of Richard Stipp)

Sherri Hosmun selling goodies to David Kero and Scott Young. (Picture courtesy of Richard Stipp)

When the soft tinkling melody, “Russian Bells” drift over the valley these summer days, kids (and grownups) everywhere rush out to the road to greet Sherri Hosmun for she is bringing “Woody’s Goody’s” to them.

Sherri, generally known as “Tinkerbelle,” is a Hazen High School senior in Renton, and driving the little ice cream wagon is her summer job. Her speedometer shows that she has covered 2,300 miles so far since she began last May 29, and she expects to continue until Labor Day.

Her route includes Maple Valley, Black Diamond, East Kent, and Ravensdale. Continue Reading »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, July 30, 1925

1925 First AidNo feature of the First Aid and Mine Rescue Meet held last Saturday at Black Diamond attracted more attention than the exhibition in first aid and resuscitation work put on by the midget teams from Newcastle and Black Diamond.

So far as is known, these two teams are the youngest First Aid-teams in the world. Continue Reading »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, July/August 1916

J.O. Boyle, Soliciting Pass. & Freight Agent, Pacific Coast Steamship Co. (Photo by Jacobs)

J.O. Boyle, Soliciting Pass. & Freight Agent, Pacific Coast Steamship Co. (Photo by Jacobs)

J.O. Boyle wasn’t born with a ticket in his mouth in place of the proverbial silver spoon. It took years of experience for him to become an expert on ticket matters.

Today a passenger boat never sails from Seattle under the flag of the Pacific Coast Steamship Company without Mr. Boyle being at the lower end of the gangplank scrutinizing every ticket presented for transportation.

The slightest error or omission doesn’t get past him. Every pasteboard must be perfect before the tourist steps aboard one of these vessels.

Mr. Boyle (“Jerry” as he is familiarly known) has just rounded out a term of fourteen years continuous service with the Pacific Coast Company. Continue Reading »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, July 22, 1927

nbd tramway

Disposal of the rock and waste material which comes from a mine is always a problem, and frequently an expensive proposition. The solution of this problem at the New Black Diamond Mine was found in the erection of an aerial tramway leading from the tipple up over the point shown in the accompanying picture, where the huge baskets capable of carrying a ton or more of rock, dump their loads into a cavernous gulch.

The total length of the tramway from the bunker terminal to the further tower is 1,900 feet. The buckets travel at a speed of 900 feet per minute, with a capacity of 80 cubic feet each, capable of handling 53 tons of material per hour. The buckets are dumped automatically.

The cable is two inches in diameter and was made by the American Steel & Wire Co.

Originally published in The Seattle Times, July 21, 1974

By Patricia Latourette Lucas

Lizzie Polli, 91, turned the pages of a family Bible.

Lizzie Polli, 91, turned the pages of a family Bible.

“WHAT’S THE difference?” said Lizzie McDonald Shafer Maxwell Polli. “So much bull comes out of my mouth, you could use it to fertilize your garden. It’s all bull.”

And yet as the afternoon wore on and we sifted through her little stacks of papers and pictures, I began to believe what the little 91-year-old lady who lives in the last remaining homestead in Maple Valley was saying.

Lizzie Polli doesn’t mince words; she has worked in coal mines, a slaughter house and at race tracks. And still she has a certain dignity.

She served popcorn, candy bars and chocolate cake as she sat in a straight-back chair at a rickety old table, her blue eyes growing dim as she searched the past for memories. Continue Reading »

Originally published in the BDHS newsletter, February 1992

By Ann Steiert

Joe Dal Santo

Joe Dal Santo

As the Thursday Crew have been working on the new rooms they have been very grateful for the good men who have turned out to help them on Thursdays. It helped a lot when they got to the part of working on the rafters and roof. This involved much high climbing which really challenged the over-70 crew.

If you passed the museum one day last month and saw a man sitting on the peak of the roof you would have recognized Joe Dal Santo, who had come to help. He was greeted with pleasure!

Joe Dal Santo is a member of the historical society and a member of a very old and prominent Black Diamond family. Continue Reading »

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, July 18, 1973

By Cathy Clouston

The dream-like prices listed outside the abandoned and soon to be demolished 4 Corners 76 station are unlikely to ever come again according to Louie Duett, manager of 4 Corners Exxon. Duett blames the steadily rising cost of living.

The dream-like prices listed outside the abandoned and soon to be demolished 4 Corners 76 station are unlikely to ever come again according to Louie Duett, manager of 4 Corners Exxon. Duett blames the steadily rising cost of living.

The current gas shortage has hit local station dealers hard, leaving some bitter toward their respective oil companies who, they feel, could have given them more warning of their reduced supply.

Stations began receiving notices of cuts in gas allowances this May—“quite a shot out of the blue,” according to Stew Minarsich of Wilderness Chevron, “when only a few weeks before the company had continued to urge promotional items that would increase the sale of gas.”

Wilderness Arco’s notice, received May 14, was retroactive to May 1. Since trucks began delivering gas to stations on the first of the month, it left Manager Fletcher Richardson in a bind for two weeks until his June supplies came in.

One station manager doesn’t believe there is an actual gas shortage. “We have the same facilities for handling gas as last year, the same refineries, the same amount of imported oil, but we do have fewer stations. My company closed 21 stations in Seattle alone last year and opened only four new ones.

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