Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Originally published in The Seattle Times, June 22, 1977

By Michael Prager
Times South Bureau

Swimmers jumped into the Green River Gorge. — Staff photos by Vic Condiotty

Swimmers jumped into the Green River Gorge. — Staff photos by Vic Condiotty

BLACK DIAMOND — Not far from the Black Diamond home of Jules Dal Santo, the Green River plunges down a magnificent gorge.

A mantelpiece to what Dal Santo and other locals call “God’s country,” the Green River Gorge is at once beautiful, rugged, and treacherous.

Each year, hundreds of people visit the gorge. They come for many reasons—fishing, canoeing, swimming, or just plain sightseeing.

But each year, the fun and beauty of the gorge are marred. Death and injury, too, are frequent visitors. Dal Santo should know.

It’s Dal Santo’s job as Black Diamond’s assistant fire chief to help rescue those whose fun turns against them.

“Broken legs, arms, necks, drownings, you name it,” the 61-year-old Dal Santo said, recalling 31 years of experience in search-and-rescue efforts on the river. Continue Reading »

Advertisements

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, June 22, 1988

From Johnson’s Corner up river. First position boat, Oh My Back V; second, Foss’ Grocery; third, M.V. Tile; fourth, Frank’s Meat II.

From Johnson’s Corner up river. First position boat, Oh My Back V; second, Foss’ Grocery; third, M.V. Tile; fourth, Frank’s Meat II.

Records tumbled like swift water through the “boulder yard” on the Cedar River June 11 as the seventh annual running of the Dinghy Derby Boat Race provided plenty of excitement for the throngs of race fans who turned out this beautiful Saturday afternoon.

The race, which is limited to dinghies under 12 feet with a paddler in front and a rower behind, was this year dedicated to “Big” Mike Williams.

Veteran starter Jim Holder, along with long-time officials Larry Johnson and Harry Honnold sent ten dinghy and eight rafts down the 4.6 mile course (from the Maple Valley Bridge to the Lions Club Park) at 30 second intervals. Continue Reading »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 20, 1924

When the man-trip starts down the slope at Newcastle Mine the men who are going on shift are always ready and waiting. This group was caught by the photographer just before they went on shift. In the front row can be seen H.G. Hagenbush, B.E. Van Alstine, A.C. Marsh, Frank Oriet, Walter Trover, Joe Daler, Otto Sproat, Victor Nelson, Robt. Joughin, and Geo. Brandon. In the back are A.L. Richards, Wm. Eddy, V.J. Ryan, Frank Hollands, and H.S. Syverson. Continue Reading »

Originally published in the Enumclaw Eagle, June 21, 1989

Talk of the Town went to Black Diamond this week to ask people just what it is about the town that makes them want to live there. We did manage to find a few residents to query in the tiny metropolis.

Carl Steiert (curator of the Black Diamond Museum): Of course, some of us have lived here all our lives—we didn’t have anything to do with that.

I don’t like big cities. I started working for the BD Stage Co., then became a mechanic. It’s pretty out here and I like the small-town atmosphere. The older folks have passed away and now the younger people are coming in. Continue Reading »

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, June 19, 1974

The Lake Heights community includes Lake Morton.

The Lake Heights community includes Lake Morton.

A new community is springing to life in the Lake Morton area south of Black Diamond and enthusiasm among its backers is increasing by the day, all reports seem to indicate.

The 28-square-mile area encompassed by the community of Lake Heights extends roughly from Horseshoe Lake and the county’s Lake Sawyer Park on the north, Highway 18 on the south, 164th Place S.E. on the west, and the Green River on the east. Continue Reading »

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, June 18, 1980

An arson fire completely gutted the Four Corners Tavern during early morning hours on June 10.

An arson fire completely gutted the Four Corners Tavern during early morning hours on June 10.

The Four Comers Tavern, 26818 Maple Valley-Black Diamond Road, was totally destroyed in an arson fire last week.

Engine companies from Fire District 43, 37, and 44 responded to the four-alarm fire which began about 2:30 a.m. on Tuesday, June 10. About 50 firemen fought the blaze for nearly an hour and a half before getting it under control. Highway 169 was closed by police until 5:30 in the morning to aid the firefighters.

The King County Fire Investigation Unit has determined that the fire had multiple points of origin and was a definite arson. Continue Reading »

Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, June 18, 1978

By Joan Mann

1971 photograph of Brunton farmhouse

1971 photograph of Brunton farmhouse

Venerable 73-year-old farmhouse with ten bedrooms is the home of Pat Brunton. It also is a Maple Valley institution. When she and her husband, the late Frederic K. Brunton, purchased the house with its surrounding 67 acres, they did not realize they also were getting a chapter in the history of the valley.

The house was built in 1905 by railroad contractor Olaf Olson, who built the narrow-gauge railway to the Monte Cristo mines and the tunnels through Rogers Pass for Canadian Pacific trains and constructed a tunnel through the Cascades for the Milwaukee Railroad. The walls of the house are solid concrete, a material familiar to Olson, all of it mixed by hand and poured by laborers who lived in tents on the site during construction. Continue Reading »