Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Tramways

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, February 19, 1925

Tramways and aerial cables are common sights around metal mines, but it’s uncommon to find a coal mine with its entrance 450 feet below the level of the surrounding country. The above view shows the “incline” at Carbonado, a 35-degree pitch, down which all supplies and the daily shifts are lowered and raised.

Carbonado Comments

Carbonado victor in soccer battle

Battling the valiant Newcastle soccer eleven, the Carbonado squad last Sunday put up such a fight that the score ended 4 to 0, with the Carbon lads on the long end. Carbonado played a fast game.

Newcastle put up a fair defense, but with a number of new men, and also handicapped by a recent period of idleness, the Coal Creek team could make little headway against the strong Carbon defense. Continue Reading »

Advertisements

Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, February 1999

Photographed on their home place in Hobart are Valentine Kochevar (in hat) and his children: Antonia, Mary, Eddie, Joey, Anne, and Christine. Another child, Aloysius (Louie) died in 1928.

Photographed on their home place in Hobart are Valentine Kochevar (in hat) and his children: Antonia, Mary, Eddie, Joey, Anne, and Christine. Another child, Aloysius (Louie) died in 1928.

The latest publication by the Maple Valley Historical Society is the “Kochevar Family Recipes and Remembrances.” The 104-page cookbook contains old family recipes and history of the immigrant Kochevar family as well as an ancestor chart.

Father Valentine, who was born on Valentine’s Day 1874, in Austria (Slovenia) in what is now Yugoslavia, came to the United States in 1903. He worked in Black Diamond, logged in Enumclaw, then went to Ravensdale and Taylor, before settling in Hobart. He married Antonia Zagridisnik, also an immigrant, and they raised seven children.

All of the children, except Joe and Louie, are still living. Annie makes her home on the original farm purchased by her father in 1913. The other children were Mary, Antonia, Christine, and Edward, the only child born in Hobart. The rest were born in Taylor. Continue Reading »

With smiles and shouts and laughter in which tears were very close to the surface, Seattle greeted 23 native sons and 178 Washington state dough-boys, comprising the Hoboken Casuals Company #144, at King Street Station that included Private Thomas Campbell of Hobart, Company K. 40th Engineers.

The Great Northern train which was taking the trainload of men to Camp Lewis, where they will be demobilized, only stopped in Seattle for ten minutes!

Seattle gave these men the most individual greeting that has been extended to any of the returning heroes. The men were immediately surrounded with a family group who loaded them with packages which looked like candy to while away the time between Seattle and Camp Lewis, and who ecstatically hugged anyone they could touch.

Many a soldier suffered a good-natured buffeting of a mother, wife, and sister all trying to say “hello” at once. Groups of friends besieged the men and gave them a Valentine greeting they will not soon forget.

More than four coaches of dough-boys were greeted by the Red Cross canteen workers with baskets of apples and cigarettes. One carload of men tumbled off to pose with the commanding officer of the company to a motion picture cameraman.

Welcome home Private Campbell!

Abraham Lincoln

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, February 12, 1925

Feb. 12, 1809—Apr. 15, 1865

Feb. 12, 1809—Apr. 15, 1865

One hundred sixteen years ago the Great Emancipator was born amid humbler surroundings than is the birthright of most Americans today. Yet his memory is hallowed year by year by millions, and the example of his noble ideals is set before every schoolchild; an inspiration to the attainment of the loftiest pinnacle of success, no matter how lowly the start. Continue Reading »

Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, February 11, 1886

A gentleman who came down from Franklin yesterday morning and induced the Franklin miners to join them for the purpose of driving the Chinamen out of Carbonado.

The crowd left Franklin during the forenoon about 90 strong, on foot, bound for Carbonado. They made no secret of their mission and talked as though they were prepared to carry it out.

The Carbonado mine is owned by the Pacific Improvement Company, a California corporation, and is the only mine in the territory where Chinamen are new or have for some months past been employed.

The company has been very firm in the matter, declaring that if the Chinese were not permitted to work the mine would be shut down. It is understood the officers of the company are determined and prepared to repel force by force, in which case it is not unlikely blood will be shed, as the miners who walked over there yesterday will certainly not return without making a very strong effort to accomplish their purpose.

Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, December 2009

Editor’s note: Years ago, while sitting in Bill and Mildred Harshfield’s home on Dorre Don, sipping coffee, munching on her homemade cookies and discussing baseball, I often admired the photo on the kitchen wall of the Section House that used to be in the middle of “old” Maple Valley. It was the Harshfield’s home for 33 years before it was torn down and they moved next to the railroad tracks on the Cedar River. I mentioned the desire to have a copy of that photo to their son, Frank Harshfield, at the picnic in August and soon there appeared three copies in my mailbox. Two will be recorded at the Third Floor Museum. Thank you, Frank.

Editor’s note: Years ago, while sitting in Bill and Mildred Harshfield’s home on Dorre Don, sipping coffee, munching on her homemade cookies and discussing baseball, I often admired the photo on the kitchen wall of the Section House that used to be in the middle of “old” Maple Valley. It was the Harshfield’s home for 33 years before it was torn down and they moved next to the railroad tracks on the Cedar River. I mentioned the desire to have a copy of that photo to their son, Frank Harshfield, at the picnic in August and soon there appeared three copies in my mailbox. Two will be recorded at the Third Floor Museum. Thank you, Frank.

In the booklet, “Maple Valley Family Recollections III,” 1987, Bill Harshfield recalls “Railroading Days in Maple Valley.” Excerpts from that essay describe the section house. Continue Reading »

A good man

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, February 5, 1925

Every concern is on the lookout for good men and that is why you seldom hear a good man complaining about not getting enough salary. When the firm he is with fails to pay him all his services are worth someone else is going to come along and do it. — Coleman Cox. Continue Reading »