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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, October 17, 1968

A monster has reared its ugly head in this community. It is not particular whom it chooses for its victims. Its bite has crippled, maimed, and even killed. It prefers to prey on youth, but no one is immune from its grasp. Its tentacles are comprised of alcohol, glue, and narcotics. They have reached out to kill one Enumclaw youth and reduce another to a living death.

A number of people are trying to find the reasons why it is allowed to flourish here. But one thing is certain to those concerned citizens. It is here and something must be done to rid the community of its cause and effect.

Earl and Isabelle Sherwood, whose 16 year-old son died on July 9 of this year from what a King County coroner’s jury termed “consuming excessive amounts at liquor furnished by person or persons unknown,” want to do what they can to save other parents the grief they have had to bear. Continue Reading »

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, October 17, 1924

One feature of the Pacific Coast Coal Company bunkers on Seattle Harbor, not found in many other ports, is the fact that deep sea vessels may get prompt repairs, when necessary, while bunker coal is being loaded. Immediately adjacent to the bunkers are the large shops of the Pacific Coast Engineering Company, a subsidiary of The Pacific Coast Company, whose trained men and modern equipment are capable of handling any marine repair work except dry docking.

This work is frequently performed while the ship is loading coal, and the vessel can remain in the same slip until the job is completed without interfering with other operations. The picture shows the Westward Ho, an 8,800-ton U.S. Shipping Board carrier, taking on bunkers while undergoing extensive alterations at the same time by the Pacific Coast Engineering Company. Continue Reading »

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, October 17, 1895

Before Justice Caldwell at 2:30 o’clock this afternoon the preliminary hearing in the case of the state against Al Thomas, the colored barber, was called.

It was practically agreed that the case should be settled by the defendant paying the costs.

Dave Mason, another colored man [from Franklin], is the complaining witness. He says that on October 10, Thomas, who has a barber shop, refused to shave him.

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, October 12, 1895

And so an arrest follows

A nice question for Justice Caldwell to investigate—Thomas’ reason for refusing was not a question of color—Mason’s statement

Barber Al Thomas, who runs the O.K. barber shop on Yesler Avenue, north side, which sits in the right of way of the Seattle, Lake Shore & Eastern Railroad, refused to shave David Mason, a colored miner from Franklin, and the latter has had Thomas arrested. Continue Reading »

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, October 10, 1979

By D’Ann Pedee

The event above is past history, but Tahoma High School’s new reader board is very much up-to-date, being installed only last week.

The event above is past history, but Tahoma High School’s new reader board is very much up-to-date, being installed only last week.

A dream became a reality last week as a blue and gold Tahoma reader board was erected.

For years, students and school personnel have wanted a means to advertise school sports and other events. With student monetary support, parental donations and labor, and the blessing of administrators, the sign stood in place advertising a recent home game.

The board is located on SE 240th at the south edge of Tahoma’s campus and can be read from both the Kent and Maple Valley entrances to the school.

“This sign has been years in planning,” said Pete Ryan, athletic director who is currently in charge of the sign’s upkeep. Continue Reading »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, October 10, 1924

Seldom are train robbers obliging enough to pose for a photograph, but down at San Luis Obispo, California, the Pacific Coast Railway Company’s “Valley Flier” was recently held up by a band of armed men at Exposition Grounds station, just outside of San Luis Obispo, and this picture attests the fact that there was a photographer in the vicinity. The Rotary Club emblem on the rear coach, however, calls for an explanation.

The train carried a party of Rotarians from Santa Maria and the two-gun bandit in cowboy attire was none other than W.T. Masengill, superintendent of the Pacific Coast Railway, who assisted in removing the passengers and carrying them off into the woods. The Pacific Coast Railway is a subsidiary of The Pacific Coast Company. Continue Reading »

Originally published in Valley Living, October 9, 1987

By Peggy Ziebarth
Valley Living Editor

Neely Mansion in Auburn is high on Palmer’s list of favorite local landmarks.

Neely Mansion in Auburn is high on Palmer’s list of favorite local landmarks.

“Every time an old house goes, a part of me goes with it,” says Dan Palmer, shuffling through a stack of photographs of historic landmarks scattered over the Valley.

“I can take it when nature takes them, but when it’s the bulldozers…,” Palmer’s voice softens in regret.

Palmer, a folk musician and craftsman by trade, really started getting serious about Valley history when he moved to Black Diamond. And as his interest grew, he started accumulating articles and books on the area’s roots and mounting his own collection of photographs of buildings still standing and the overgrown remnants of a boisterous coal mining past. Continue Reading »