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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, August 21, 1906

Teams from two mining towns have a lively eleven-inning battle on the ball field

Renton defeated Black Diamond Sunday at the latter place in a well-played eleven-inning game. Score, 7 to 4. Renton made a rally in the eleventh, rushing three runs over the platter, and as Skillman finished strong, Black Diamond was blanked.

The feature of a game replete with sensational plays was the batting of Harry Richmond and Thielman and the fast fielding of Ayers of Renton and Calhoun of Black Diamond. Continue Reading »

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Originally published in the Renton News Record, August 20, 1959

This swarm of girls is only part of the 300 who took part in closing day ceremonies at the Lions Memorial Youth Camp on Cedar River last Thursday. Each of the 16 groups gave a skit or demonstration as their part of the closing activities.

This swarm of girls is only part of the 300 who took part in closing day ceremonies at the Lions Memorial Youth Camp on Cedar River last Thursday. Each of the 16 groups gave a skit or demonstration as their part of the closing activities.

At least 7,000 Greater Renton area youngsters had a taste of outdoor living this summer through participation in organized day camping at the Lions Memorial Youth Camp on the Cedar River.

When the program closed for the summer last Friday, Gene Coulon said at least 7,000 boys and girls from 7 to 13 had visited the camp on a strictly organized basis plus several hundred more under the sponsorship of churches, community, and other youth groups. Continue Reading »

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, August 20, 1913

Shift boss and fire boss are victims of mysterious blazes

BLACK DIAMOND, Saturday, Aug. 16. – Two mysterious fires have occurred in the last two days, one of which completely destroyed the home of Hughie Hughes, a shift boss, and the other partially destroying the dwelling of Jack Larson, a fire boss in the mines.

Hughes’ loss is about $1,000 and Larson’s about $500, with no insurance.

For more about the mysterious fires of 1913, go to:

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, September 1988

By Heather Larson

Black Diamond’s “Person of the Year,” honored at the town’s annual Labor Day weekend celebration, was Lois Zumek, shown above. — Voice photo by Terry McLellan.

Black Diamond’s “Person of the Year,” honored at the town’s annual Labor Day weekend celebration, was Lois Zumek, shown above. — Voice photo by Terry McLellan.

Black Diamond’s annual September celebration commemorates days past when the coal mining industry reigned. The culmination of the festivities is on Labor Day with a parade, pancake breakfast, games, and a greased pole climb.

The Laurel Assembly No. 144 of Rainbow Girls in conjunction with the Black Diamond Masons served breakfast to 142 adults and 10 children on Monday. The meal consisted of ham, pancakes, scrambled eggs, juice, and coffee.

Honored in the nearly one-hour parade down the Maple Valley Highway were Lois Zumek, person of the year; Jim and Connie Leider; King and Queen; and Paul and Gertie Botts, prince and princess. Continue Reading »

Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, August 31, 1988

You can listen to a bit of Black Diamond history at noon on Labor Day when Dan Palmer sings “Black Diamond Mines” at the ballpark.

The song, which the Black Diamond folk singer wrote in 1982 for the town’s centennial celebration, has five verses that tell of the early mining days in the area.

It talks of Morgan Morgans, who was the mining superintendent, 80-year-old old-time miner Dooda Vernarelli, the mining whistles, and the veins of deep, black coal.

“It’s one of my best tunes as far as audience response and recognition,” Palmer said.

Vernarelli was Palmer’s neighbor. Palmer said he and Vernarelli were talking about the song one day and Vernarelli said Palmer had to mention the mining whistles in the song. Continue Reading »

Originally published by the Valley Daily News, September 2, 1988

By Bruce Rommel
Staff reporter

Residents of Black Diamond will gather again Sunday and Monday to honor the American worker, and remember the days when coal was king.

There will be flags and a parade, a greased-pole climb, soap box racers, and pie-eating contests.

Area residents are invited to join the festivities and learn something about the century-old community’s coal-mining heydays.

A pancake breakfast and parade are planned for Monday morning, followed by brief Labor Day ceremonies and an afternoon of family oriented games and other events.

The annual Labor Day observance in Black Diamond carries on a tradition begun at the turn of the century in the one-time company town. Labor Day once meant a show of solidarity of union coal miners who clashed with company goons in bitter and sometimes violent strikes during the 1920s. Continue Reading »

Originally published in the Enumclaw Eagle, August 31, 1988

BLACK DIAMOND — Thousands of people are expected to take a break from work at the annual Black Diamond Labor Day festival this weekend.

An adult dance opens the celebration Saturday, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m., at the Black Diamond Eagles Hall. A midnight buffet will be served, and “White Water” will provide the music.

Marching bands, antique cars, children’s groups, floats, and horses will participate in Monday’s parade, which begins at 10 a.m. The parade travels on Highway 169 from Third and Lawson streets to the baseball diamond at Black Diamond Elementary School. Continue Reading »