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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, October 23, 1895

The Oregon Improvement Company’s coal mine at Franklin has been closed down and sealed in order to smother the fire which occurred in the main slope last week and in which four men lost their lives. Continue Reading »

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, October 23, 1978

Hard at work on the mini-park to-be near the Reader Board in central Maple Valley are these two members of the Plant and Wish Garden Club, left to right, Betty Sahlin and Helen Cook. Several community groups have offered their help—manually and financially—and more such aid is needed before the park can blossom.

Hard at work on the mini-park to-be near the Reader Board in central Maple Valley are these two members of the Plant and Wish Garden Club, left to right, Betty Sahlin and Helen Cook. Several community groups have offered their help—manually and financially—and more such aid is needed before the park can blossom.

A mini-park right in “downtown” Maple Valley, so to speak, is the current goal of three community organizations—the Maple Valley Lions’ Club, the Plant and Wish Garden Club, and the Maple Valley Historical Society.

The Lions are interested in bringing their bus shelter and reader board project to a close. About 25 more hours of work are needed, reports Johnny Markus of Ravensdale, to place a roof over the reader board to protect the lighting, build storage space for the reader board letters, do some remaining concrete work, and wire in the lights.

The historical group is eyeing the abandoned residence on the site, owned by Burlington Railroad. It would make an ideal place, members believe, for a museum.

The garden club is hard at work developing the mini-park itself on the triangular lot between the Maple Valley-Hobart Road and Highway 169.

Already plastic and chips have been laid on a section of the park and the ground smoothed for more plastic and chips. Robert Sloboden, James Daoust, Robert Smith, and Joe Wicks helped their garden club wives with this phase of the work.

The Slobodens’ sons also assisted. The gardeners especially thank Joe Wicks for the use of his back-hoe, the county for the chips, and those who started the mini-park ball rolling with monetary contributions.

The latter includes, so far, Gordon Gaub of the Maple Valley Food Center ($20) and the Maple Valley Lions Club ($50).

The garden club ladies are asking for more donations and are planning on planting trees and shrubs as soon as the weather permits.

The whole community is welcome to participate in the project.

Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, October 19, 1952

Seattle Sunday Times, October 19, 1952The view of Maple Valley in autumn depicted on Page 1 of this Magazine Section appealed to Parker McAllister, Times staff artist, as most appropriate for inclusion in his series of rural scenes in the Puget Sound country. Continue Reading »

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, October 18, 1978

By George and Dianne Wilson

Black Diamond’s Community Service center team—they spread rays of hope and comfort. Front row: Evelyn Gronemeyer, Lee Lombardini; back row, Nonie Coby, Jan Glasscock. –Voice photo by Bob Gerbing.

Black Diamond’s Community Service center team—they spread rays of hope and comfort. Front row: Evelyn Gronemeyer, Lee Lombardini; back row, Nonie Coby, Jan Glasscock. –Voice photo by Bob Gerbing.

It’s official—the Black Diamond Community Service Center has a new coordinator. Jan Glasscock, who has served the center as outreach worker for the past 11 months, has been hired to fill the post through next April.

The selection is most appropriate as Jan is fully aware of the needs of the community and is dedicated to meeting those needs as well as is possible.

During the next seven months, she will attempt to initiate new programs, coordinate and meet the needs of the community, and carry on the center’s crisis, alcohol, and family problem counseling. Jan can also make referrals.

She will get a lot of support from Nonie Coby, Lee Lombardini, Mary Anne Lind, and Rose Murdock. Continue Reading »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, October 18, 1923

When those who had gathered at Burnett last Thursday, to attend the monthly meeting of the Store Department, checked up after all were seated around the dinner table it was discovered that all records had been broken in the number attending, a count showing 52 present. After an excellent dinner, prepared and served by Chef Emil Bernhard and his assistants, an instructive and enjoyable program of talks was attentively listened to.

J.C. Hinckley of the West Coast Grocery Co., Tacoma, led off with a very able talk of an inspirational nature. He was followed by L.W. Foreman, the new manager of Burnett store, who briefly outlined his program for the development of trade. R.A. Krebs, manager of Newcastle store, then read a paper dealing with salesmanship, which was followed by a talk on “Some Knotty Problems” by H.M. McDowell, manager of Black Diamond store. McDowell’s talk provoked an extended discussion of various problems met with daily in the company stores. Continue Reading »

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, October 18, 1895

The slope is stopped up

Franklin mines continue to be the scene of excitement—every effort was made to rescue the four unfortunate men without avail

The bodies of the four men known to have perished in the slope fire yesterday at the Franklin coal mines have not been recovered and the fire has not yet been extinguished, although the flames have been got under control and the slope closed up with timbers, sand, and dirt.

Of the men dead, full mention of whom was made in the 5 o’clock edition of last evening’s Times, John Glover was a white man and George W. Smalley, John Adams, and James Stafford were colored men, Smalley leaving a wife and child and Adams and Stafford being single men. Continue Reading »

Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, October 17, 1895

Flames and smoke: The miners make a mad rush for safety

The fire broke out shortly after dinner—whole town is wild with excitement and every man is endeavoring to put out the fire by shoveling dirt into the mouth of the burning slope

Dirty job: Franklin miners, ca. 1915.

Dirty job: Franklin miners, ca. 1915.

News reached the city about 1:30 o’clock this afternoon from Franklin stating that fire had broken out in the main slope, between the fifth and sixth levels, and that many miners were cut off from escape. Later it was ascertained that most of the men in the men had gotten out by means of the rock tunnel to another avenue of escape.

For a time it was reported that four men only were nearly killed, but at the time of going to press all of the men have been accounted for except three, and these, it is believed, are dead. Continue Reading »