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It’s the U.S. Post Office of Palmer all right, but it’s tucked away at the side of a residence in Kanasket. Puzzling? Perhaps the article will begin to clarify matters. (Staff photo by Lowell Lorenz)

It’s the U.S. Post Office of Palmer all right, but it’s tucked away at the side of a residence in Kanasket. Puzzling? Perhaps the article will begin to clarify matters. (Staff photo by Lowell Lorenz)

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, August 23, 1972 By Laura Lorenz Logging trucks now roll along a paved two-lane highway past Palmer, a community that was once the center of railroad activity. Only a few decades before logs, coal, supplies, and passengers all rolled on rails. The dirt road was only passable for horseback. Continue Reading »

Originally published in the Globe News, July 4, 1976

Story by Bill Smull
Photos by Smull, Larry Abele

Arrow-straight Burlington Northern rails streak toward Stampede Pass tunnel.

Arrow-straight Burlington Northern rails streak toward Stampede Pass tunnel.

Call it Palmer if you like—the post office has that name on its sign, and everyone will know that you’re most likely talking about the informal collection of buildings nestled between the north bank of the Green River and the Burlington Northern sidings. Continue Reading »

The Pacific Coast Coal Co. power house and bunkers at Mine 11, historically known as the Morgan Slope during the mine’s first two decades of production. (July 15, 1917)

The Pacific Coast Coal Co. power house and bunkers at Mine 11, historically known as the Morgan Slope during the mine’s first two decades of production. (July 15, 1917)

By JoAnne Matsumura

In the early morning hours of April 26, 1907, the morning shift of miners descended into Mine 11’s Morgan Slope to the sixth level and began their work. Suddenly at about 6:50 a.m., an explosion occurred that took seven lives and injured six men. The men were removed from the mine prior to the arrival of the officials. Continue Reading »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 26, 1922

PCCC womenAlthough the women shown in this photograph are wearing miners’ caps and safety lamps, they are not miners.

They are a charming group of six society women who recently had charge of the Pacific Coast Coal Company booth at the Manufacturers’ Exhibit at Toppenish, Wash. Continue Reading »

Coal miners at the Newcastle mine take time out for a photo with a car similar the ones lost in the lake when the barge they were being transported on sunk during a Jan. 12, 1875, windstorm. (Renton Historical Society photo)

Coal miners at the Newcastle mine take time out for a photo with a car similar to the ones lost in the lake when the barge they were being transported on sunk during a Jan. 12, 1875, windstorm. (Renton Historical Society photo)

Originally published in the Eastside Journal, April 18, 1989

By Herbert Atienza

A Newcastle coal train preserved intact under the chilly depths of Lake Washington for almost 125 years will be brought to the surface again.

The 18-car, narrow-gauge train was discovered in the middle of the lake five years ago, still loaded with coal, south of the I-520 bridge, west of Medina. Continue Reading »

Originally published in The News Journal, April 18, 1976

By Nancy Gould

Crumbling stone walls, broken finials, moss and weeds are impossible for volunteer caretakers to remedy at Black Diamond cemetery. “The most we can do is get a work party together once a year to clean it up,” said Verna Thompson who has the records. A few years ago a fund raising dinner raised enough money for the purchase of a cyclone fence, but volunteer help is running out.

Crumbling stone walls, broken finials, moss and weeds are impossible for volunteer caretakers to remedy at Black Diamond cemetery. “The most we can do is get a work party together once a year to clean it up,” said Verna Thompson who has the records. A few years ago a fund raising dinner raised enough money for the purchase of a cyclone fence, but volunteer help is running out.

A gray-haired woman sat in the audience at Thursday night’s Black Diamond Town Council meeting, as she has for many previous meetings, holding a large straw satchel full of record books, receipts, and funds.

“Guess I’ll have to take ‘em back home with me again,” said Verna Thompson, the holder of the historic Black Diamond cemetery data, at the close of the meeting. “I’ve been ready to hand them over to the council for two years now, but no go.”

Ms. Thompson is not sure how she was the one to end up with the care-taking job, but she is sure the 3.4-acre burial ground for pioneers and miners needs an official overseer. Continue Reading »

Originally published in the Issaquah Press, April 12, 1989

By Michael Landauer

Heavy rains seeping into an old coal mine contributed in a wash out on Wildwood Boulevard April 8. City crews scrambled to stabilize the situation to prevent more damage to utilities as well as to the three-year-old improvements to Wildwood. Another fear was that the slide would reach Issaquah Creak, threatening houses across the way with flooding and possibly wreaking havoc on the state fish hatchery not far down stream. Photo by Michael Landauer.

Heavy rains seeping into an old coal mine contributed in a wash out on Wildwood Boulevard April 8. City crews scrambled to stabilize the situation to prevent more damage to utilities as well as to the three-year-old improvements to Wildwood. Another fear was that the slide would reach Issaquah Creak, threatening houses across the way with flooding and possibly wreaking havoc on the state fish hatchery not far down stream. Photo by Michael Landauer.

Last week’s heavy rains contributed to a landslide on Wildwood Boulevard that momentarily threatened a number of homes and has temporarily closed the street until repairs can be made. Continue Reading »

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