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Archive for February, 2012

Drawing of Franklin, circa 1887.

Drawing of Franklin, circa 1887.

By Chuck Holtz

Originally published in the BDHS newsletter, January 1977/April 1995

This article, about the Franklin mines, is the second part of articles about the coal mines in our area. The first article was published in the Feb. 1995 issue. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier, February 27, 1920

Tombstone for Joseph T. Paschich

The funeral service for Joseph T. Paschich, who was slain at his home at Cumberland last Thursday morning, was held at 10 a.m. Monday in the Sacred Heart church, Rev. O’Rafferty officiating. An unusual large number of sorrowing friends and businessmen gathered to pay their last respects to the man who had fallen so unjustly at the hands of another. Many beautiful flowers bedecked the casket, and with bowed heads the concourse of friends followed the remains to Krain cemetery where the body was laid to rest, beside the mother, who departed this life several years ago. (Enumclaw Courier, March 5, 1920)

Joseph Paschich, storekeeper and postmaster at Cumberland, was shot to death at his home Thursday morning [Feb. 26]. He was roused from sleep about 2 o’clock by the smashing of glass at the front of the store. The family lives in the building. Paschich arose and stopping only to put on his trousers and seize a gun, ran out probably supposing a robbery was being attempted. As he appeared around the corner of the building he received a shot in the left breast near the heart. The effect not being immediately fatal, he emptied his gun and returned to his room, where he soon expired.

The opinion of some who are familiar with the circumstances is that the deed was planned, by enemies to draw Paschich to the scene and make way with him, rather than for the purpose of robbing the store and post office. This theory comes from the fact that the breaking of the glass was so loud as to resemble an explosion, and nothing indicates that the outlaws gained entrance. (more…)

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By JoAnne Matsumura

It was ACTION! CAMERA! TAKE 1! ROLL EM! In 1975, Black Arts/West came to town and shot 13 hours of film about the story of the Northern Pacific Railroad bringing blacks to Roslyn to work as strikebreakers in the coal mines in 1888. The movie is titled, Roslyn Migration, under the series “South by Northwest” by Nat Long. The Black Diamond segment depicts a mine disaster.

The movie was a government-sponsored television series produced by Washington State University and funded by a grant from the Department of Health, Education and Welfare. (more…)

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Originally published in the BDHS newsletter, February 1995

By Chuck Holtz

We will cover a section on the mines in this area as taken from some previous articles which have appeared in the newsletter. While this may be repetious, it will also be new to some.

The Coal Mines

Slope No. 2 with sister mine No. 14 in the background, about 1890. This slope, in Black Diamond, was worked to five levels but was never greatly expanded like No. 14 because of rock faults.

Slope No. 2 with sister mine No. 14 in the background, about 1890. This slope, in Black Diamond, was worked to five levels but was never greatly expanded like No. 14 because of rock faults.

#14 Mine: This was the first mine in the Green River coal fields. It was developed between 1882 and 1884 by the Black Diamond Coal Co.—the first coal having to wait for the completion of the railroad before it could be hauled to market. The first train load was hauled to Seattle from this mine in March 1885. #14, on the McKay bed, reached ten levels and was mined under the able direction of Morgan Morgans for well over 30 years. The concrete hoist foundation can still be seen just east of SR 169 across from the senior housing. (more…)

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