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Archive for October, 2013

Originally published in the Maple Valley Messenger, October 27, 1921

1921 miners' strikeMany donations are received from Maple Valley residents and grangers to aid striking miners at Black Diamond

The committee appointed by Cedar Grange at its last meeting to solicit aid for the striking miners at Black Diamond has surely been on the job with a vengeance.

Two truck loads of provisions were taken to the Black Diamond union men on Tuesday, October 17, and Charles Olson, committee member, made several trips with his own car. The truck, donated by the Desmond boys, was loaded to capacity both times with all manner of foodstuffs.

Here is a list of donations gathered together by Mr. Olson:

  • 21 sacks of potatoes
  • 6 sacks apples
  • 1 box apples
  • 3 sacks carrots
  • 1 sack flour
  • 1 case pork and beans
  • 1 sack pumpkin and squash
  • 1 case pineapple
  • 1 case soap
  • 24 ½-pound packages tea
  • 1 sack cabbage
  • 3 pounds butter
  • 1 carton macaroni
  • 1 slab bacon
  • 10 pounds coffee

No report has been received as yet on the donations collected from Hobart by Mr. Oscar Johnson, nor from Swan Lake [now Lake Youngs] by Mr. F. Taggart, which are bound to swell the contribution of Cedar Grange to a goodly amount.

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Originally published in The Seattle Star, October 26, 1904

He smoked up his barroom with a big six-shooter and now languishes in the county jail charged with attempting to shoot a deputy sheriff

Matt Starwich would eventually become the sheriff of King County, 1921-1926.

Matt Starwich would eventually become the sheriff of King County, 1921-1926.

Frank Groshel, proprietor of the Austrian saloon at Ravensdale, a coal mining town in the southern part of the county, ran amuck in that resort early yesterday morning, and as a result is now nursing a headache in the King County bastille pending a hearing on a charge of murderous assault.

Groshel was arrested and brought to the city by Deputy Sheriff Matt Starwich, stationed at Ravensdale, upon whom the assault was made. The deputy attempted to arrest the saloon man while the row was in progress and narrowly escaped stopping a bullet from Groshel’s big six-shooter.

Groshel has some trouble in his family Monday night. Soon after midnight he come into his saloon and with a double jointed oath ordered every mother’s son in the house to line up at the bar for a drink.

The various sons were too thirsty to consider the terms of the invitation critically and lined up. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, October 24, 1963

Crystal MountainThe new Crystal Mountain winter sports area is readying for its first full season of operation according to Melvin Borgersen, manager of Crystal Mountain, Inc., developers of the project. Although Crystal Mountain operated last winter it did so only on a limited basis due to the fact that the 1962-1963 season was used by the operators as a “shake down” period.

Borgersen reported this week that the state’s newest skiing facility, which is located approximately 38 miles northeast of Enumclaw in the Silver Creek region, has undergone vast changes during the summer and fall. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier, October 20, 1911

Selleck HotelThe Pacific States Lumber Company at Selleck has just completed a fine modern hotel, which is to be formally opened with a grand ball and oyster supper on Saturday evening, October 21, under the auspices of the Selleck Band.

For the convenience of people from Enumclaw and other points trains will leave Selleck after the ball at 12:30 and at 2:00 a.m.

A cordial invitation is extended to all, and a good number in attendance from Enumclaw would be most gratifying to the people of Selleck.

The new hotel is a modern, three-story structure, and would do credit to a town many times the size of Selleck.

It has a capacity of sixty rooms, and is finished in slash grain fir beautifully stained, the rooms being neatly furnished.

The building is steam heated throughout, and has toilets and shower-baths on the two lower floors.

The lobby is large and roomy, and the dining hall has a seating capacity of about two hundred and fifty.

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Originally published in the Globe News, July 4, 1976

By Bill Smull

Black Diamond youngsters face the future in Morgansville, a part of town which stands as a monument to the tenacity of the 1920s mine workers. Town’s elementary school may merge with Enumclaw; high school students already attend there.

Black Diamond youngsters face the future in Morgansville, a part of town which stands as a monument to the tenacity of the 1920s mine workers. Town’s elementary school may merge with Enumclaw; high school students already attend there.

Black Diamond. Since before the turn of the century the name has stood for a lusty, straightforward, down-to-earth community.

Its heritage is one of taking determined (or stubborn, if you were on the other side) stands on issues and backing up those stands with action, when necessary.

Like the bitter strike against Pacific Coast Coal Co. in early twenties, Black Diamond’s Union Stump stands encased in concrete behind the Morgansville Tavern, a memorial to the stubborn determination of miners who as early as 1907 began meeting on Tim Morgans’ land, just over the company’s property line, to discuss means of obtaining higher wages and better working conditions.

The stump is still there, but the mining business is all but gone; the last vestiges of local coal-mining activity are being phased out. A more vital memorial is Morgansville itself, a collection of tiny frame houses crowded together along narrow lanes, built with union materials and donated time to house miners who were thrown out of company housing during the bitter strike of the twenties. (more…)

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Originally published in the Tacoma News Tribune, October 19, 1991

As a worker adds a final spot of paint, historian Carl Steiert gazes at the newly reopened Green River Gorge Bridge, which stands 155 feet above the water and is a link to the Black Diamond area’s colorful past. (Photo: Dean J. Koepfler)

As a worker adds a final spot of paint, historian Carl Steiert gazes at the newly reopened Green River Gorge Bridge, which stands 155 feet above the water and is a link to the Black Diamond area’s colorful past. (Photo: Dean J. Koepfler)

By Bart Ripp

The bridge, deep in the woods of South King County, eavesdrops on a roar few hear.

Once a teeming tourist destination, lately a solemn sentry over cascades and canyons, the Green River Gorge Bridge has reopened after being closed for four years. A $2.8 million project by King County rehabilitated the bridge and its distinct history.

The Green River Gorge Bridge is the only structure of its kind in King County. In bridge parlance, it is a Baltimore Petit truss bridge. In terms less engineering, the bridge is a link to a time when people did not leave their home county to go on a trip.

The original bridge was built in the late 1880s, to link the coal mining communities of Black Diamond, still a thumping town, and Cumberland, Bayne and Palmer, which have gone to blackberries and alders. (more…)

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Originally published in the Globe News, August 17, 1975

By Bill Smull

Large group of Cumberland area miners pose for a portrait. Knowledgeable old-timers say the picture must predate World War I, because of whale-oil miners’ lamps, forerunner of the carbide lamps. Eighth person from left in second row reportedly is Louie Cinkovich, now a resident of Enumclaw. No other information was immediately available on the picture.

Large group of Cumberland area miners pose for a portrait. Knowledgeable old-timers say the picture must predate World War I, because of whale-oil miners’ lamps, forerunner of the carbide lamps. Eighth person from left in second row reportedly is Louie Cinkovich, now a resident of Enumclaw. No other information was immediately available on the picture.

The railroad created the mines, just as surely as it created the roadbed and the shiny metal rails that carried millions of tons of coal away from the forested Cascade valleys.

The coal companies, in turn, created Cumberland, naming it after the rich Pennsylvania mining area and peopling it with thousands of immigrants who found their “promised land” in the black veins lacing those rounded, ancient hills. (more…)

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