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Archive for June, 2014

Originally published in the BDHS newsletter, Fall 1997

By Vivian Bainton

While making plans for the state’s bicentennial celebration, a group of Black Diamond residents wanted to do something for the town. They felt the history of the area should be preserved. This was the start of the Black Diamond Historical Society.

The circa 1885 Black Diamond train depot is undergoing an uplift to ready it for the Labor Day Bicentennial festivities.

The circa 1885 Black Diamond train depot is undergoing an uplift to ready it for the Labor Day Bicentennial festivities.

The new historical society used a room at the south end of the railroad depot for a museum. The bicentennial was a success and the museum had a lot of visitors. In the days following items for display and preservation were donated. This required more space and ending up filling the entire depot. The building was run down and needed a lot of “tender loving care.” (more…)

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Originally published in the News-Journal, June 26, 1975

By Bill Smull

George Clifford, who “never got around to getting married,” nevertheless enjoyed a rousing birthday party recently with good friends at the King Tavern in Black Diamond.

George Clifford, who “never got around to getting married,” nevertheless enjoyed a rousing birthday party recently with good friends at the King Tavern in Black Diamond.

George Clifford was trying to retire when he came to Black Diamond 17 years ago; he never really got around to it. At 85, he’s not of a mind to punch anyone else’s time clock, and he makes no claim to being as spry as he once was, but you’re more likely to find him cutting wood in his backyard than taking it easy at home.

He’s also more likely to be spinning a yarn for spellbound youngsters than reliving the “good ol’ days” with other senior citizens. He’d rather drive his battered 1953 Dodge pickup—using a still-valid Washington driver’s license—than sit in a rocking chair. And he’d rather perch on a bar stool and hoist a couple of cold ones among good company than relegate himself to the sedentary role usually provided for octogenarians. (more…)

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Originally published in Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 25, 1925

Fortuna ParkPractically the entire populations of Newcastle, Burnett, Carbonado, Black Diamond, and Wilkeson joined in celebrating the first annual picnic given by the employees of the Pacific Coast Coal Company and allied companies at Fortuna Park. Music was plentifully dispensed throughout the day by the combined Newcastle and Black Diamond bands, numbering 40 pieces in all. Wilkeson, as special guests from the Wilkeson Coal & Coke Co., came in more than 50 automobiles, each decorated with a distinctive sign. The ambulance was utilized as a supply wagon. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 1914

8-hour

That the Eight Hour Day is not an entirely unmixed blessing for the working man can easily be shown.

By the laws of nature practically every man living in this world is condemned to earn his bread by the sweat of his brow. The very few exceptions to this natural law do not last long if they are not industrious in looking after their interests.

The more industrious a man is, that is, the more he works, the more he will earn and, naturally, the more he earns the more he can and should gain for himself. If he restricts his hours of labor, beyond a reasonable limit, he restricts his earning capacity and in the long run must, inevitably, restrict his own income. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, July-August, 1916

Earl Upton, Elsie Swanson, Florence Rodway, Pearl Lewis, George Allen

The graduating class of 1916: Earl Upton, Elsie Swanson, Florence Rodway, Pearl Lewis, and George Allen

The editor enjoyed a very interesting evening at Black Diamond Friday, June 16, listening to the program of the graduating class of the Black Diamond high school.

There was an oration by each of the five members of the class, all of which were good; some of them extraordinarily good.

It was difficult to believe, until assured of the fact, that some of the orations were entirely original. They showed study and thought beyond the average of high school graduates.

The orations were interspersed with excellent music by the Black Diamond orchestra. There were also vocal and instrumental selections by members of the graduating class.

Mr. Albert Weatherbee, principal, and his staff of teachers are to be congratulated upon the excellent talent displayed by this graduating class.

Click here for a copy of the commencement program.

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An abstract from a thesis by John Melvin Kinney, 1931, University of Washington, 379.175 K62h

Florence Harries (mother of Lois Thomas Zumek Estby, BDHS member now in her late 90s),

Florence Harries (mother of Lois Thomas Zumek Estby, BDHS member now in her late 90s).

When Washington organized its school system, its plans were borrowed largely from the older states. In the early days of northwest history, this organization was adequate for all purposes, but with its rapid growth, the state soon outgrew this original organization.

The present small district school organization in Washington is an outgrowth of the early system used in New England and the Middle West. While Washington was in a pioneering stage, this type of organization proved satisfactory, but now that the state has become a flourishing commonwealth, the small district is less able to provide the most economical kind of school organization. (more…)

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All aboard for home: When the men come off shift at the New Black Diamond mine they find themselves in the same situation as the average city worker—a long way from home. Consequently the company runs a special train for each shift, covering the distance between the mine and the camp in 45 minutes. West Seattle or Ballard residents who journey downtown on the Municipal Railway in many cases require an hour or more to get to their work. The picture shows the train ready to pull out with the shift coming off in the afternoon. (Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 17, 1927)

All aboard for home: When the men come off shift at the New Black Diamond mine they find themselves in the same situation as the average city worker—a long way from home. Consequently the company runs a special train for each shift, covering the distance between the mine and the camp in 45 minutes. West Seattle or Ballard residents who journey downtown on the Municipal Railway in many cases require an hour or more to get to their work. The picture shows the train ready to pull out with the shift coming off in the afternoon. (Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 17, 1927)

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, February 25, 1927

If the company’s proposal for workmen’s trains between Black Diamond, West Coast, and New Black Diamond Mines is approved at a special council meeting to be called in Black Diamond Friday evening, the trains will start the new service the morning of Tuesday, March 1. The proposed schedule is as follows: * (more…)

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