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Archive for November 22nd, 2014

Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, November 22, 1944

FACING DOOM—The town of Taylor, nestling in the foothills of the Cascades and facing doom because the Seattle water department wants to include the townsite in the Cedar River watershed. Once a prosperous coal mining town with railroad freight and passenger service, Taylor has dwindled to a settlement of 50 or 60 people living around tile plant shown here.

FACING DOOM—The town of Taylor, nestling in the foothills of the Cascades and facing doom because the Seattle water department wants to include the townsite in the Cedar River watershed. Once a prosperous coal mining town with railroad freight and passenger service, Taylor has dwindled to a settlement of 50 or 60 people living around tile plant shown here.

By Douglass Welch

The townspeople of Taylor, if you can call Taylor a town, feel they are being shoved about somewhat by the people of Seattle, but it’s an unequal contest and they are sadly resigned to an ultimate loss of their homes, their jobs, and the vista of distant mountain peaks which many of them have admired since their childhood. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Daily Times, November 22, 1915

“The Ant,” the first locomotive built on the Pacific Coast, was one of the first engines operated by what is now the Pacific Coast Railroad.

“The Ant,” the first locomotive built on the Pacific Coast, was one of the first engines operated by what is now the Pacific Coast Railroad.

The fiftieth anniversary of successful operation of the Pacific Coast Coal Company’s mines at Newcastle is being celebrated this week. With seven mines in operation in Western Washington, this company is said to be the largest coal producer on the west coast.

The first mine was operated by one of the early pioneers, Rev. Daniel Bagley, half a century ago, and was operated at first by the Seattle Coal Company. The coal was brought down from Newcastle over a tramway to Lake Washington, ferried across and conveyed to a transfer point on Lake Union where the Brace & Hergert mill now stands. (more…)

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