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Archive for January, 2016

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 25, 1922

New Pacific Coast Coal Co logo - 1927In the six working days ending with January 20, last, the latest period that could conveniently be included in this issue of the Bulletin, the coal production at our mines exceeded an average of 2,000 tons per day. The actual figure was 2,077 tons.

As this was the first time since the mines re-opened that the average daily hoist for a week reached 2,000 tons, the showing is encouraging proof that the company and its men are keeping up the steady climb toward normal production begun last August. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, April 15, 2008

Jack Morris, left and John H. Morris, center, examine a front shovel that is shown excavating the uncovered Franklin #12 coal seam. Pete Zavattero stands to the right.

Jack Morris, left and John H. Morris, center, examine a front shovel that is shown excavating the uncovered Franklin #12 coal seam. Pete Zavattero stands to the right.

By Bill Kombol

This photo shows operations of the Fulton surface coal mine on Franklin hill in May 1950.

The mine was located on a hillside above the Green River Gorge and above the old town of Franklin.

In the photo, Jack Morris, left and John H. Morris, center, examine a front shovel that is shown excavating the uncovered Franklin #12 coal seam. Pete Zavattero stands to the right.

At the completion of surface mining, the site eventually returned to a forested condition with maple, alder, cottonwood and some scattered conifer seeding this otherwise unreclaimed mine.

In the fall of 2007 the property was logged of the timber that had grown over the past 57 years, and in early March 2008, over 8,000 Douglas fir seedlings were planted.

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 25, 1922

Pacific Coast Coal Co. Logo 1922We hear of idleness and want among union coal miners in many parts of the country. With whom does the responsibility rest?

The following article, reprinted from “The Black Diamond,” discusses the facts as the editor of that publication sees them, and his conclusion will interest every one seeking to find a solution of the problem. (more…)

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Originally published in the Eastside Journal, January 27, 2000

By Tim Larson

After visiting a massive sinkhole in Cougar Mountain Park, a federal expert will recommend the use of giant boulders to plug the dangerous chasm.

Ginger Kaldenbach, a scientist with the Department of Interior’s Office of Surface Mining in Denver, says the hole isn’t solid enough to pour concrete.

Roughly 60 feet long, 35 feet wide and about 40 feet deep, the kidney-shaped opening leads down to an angled mine shaft that may descend another 300 feet.

“We got close enough to see there is an opening into the mine workings,” Kaldenbach said. “We could see there was an old wooden bulkhead … that’s just rotted away and collapsed in.” (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May-June 1916

Revolving coal tipples used at the Cannon mine, Franklin, designed by R.R. Sterling, who appears in the center of the picture. These machines were built at the Seattle shops of the Pacific Coast Company.

Revolving coal tipples used at the Cannon mine, Franklin, designed by R.R. Sterling, who appears in the center of the picture. These machines were built at the Seattle shops of the Pacific Coast Company.

A method of dumping coal, as it comes from the mine, into the bunkers, that is the last word in efficiency, was conceived and developed by R.R. Sterling of the engineering staff of the Pacific Coast Company.

At the Cannon mine, Franklin, the largest machine for this purpose ever built, is used when the mine is operated. This device takes four loaded cars at a time and in one operation dumps them and returns them to the track. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 25, 1922

Frank R. Blackman, operator at the power plant at Cannon Mine [in Franklin] sends in this article:

Coal tar soap

Coal tar soap

Coke, illuminating gas, and tar are obtained by the distillation of ordinary coal. From the nitration of tar the famous T.N.T. is produced on one hand and the mild preservative of soda, on the other.

By far the most interesting of coal tar products, however, is the dye industry, which has assumed tremendous proportions in this country since the war, and which promises to rank as one of our leading industries in a comparatively short time. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 25, 1922

By Geo. Watkin Evans, consulting coal mining engineer, Seattle

Pacific Coast Coal Co. Logo 1922The articles written thus far describing the coal fields of the State of Washington have dealt with fields which, with the exception of the Bellingham coal mines in Whatcom County, do not contain coal mines of very great commercial importance.

King County, next in order of discussion, is one of the three important bituminous coal areas of the state, the other two being Pierce and Kittitas counties. King County contains coal areas of such importance that it will be advisable to divide them under subdivisions, as follows:

Newcastle–Issaquah–Grand Ridge area; Cedar River area; Raging River–Upper Cedar River area; Ravensdale–Black Diamond area; Pacosco–Hyde area; Kummer–Krain area; National–Navy area; Bayne–Pocahontas area; Durham–Kangley area.

By subdividing the field into the above groups, the geological structure of the fields and the types of coal contained in them can be handled to best advantage. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, January 23, 2002

By Kathleen E. Kear

HagoodUnder new ownership and management, the Maple Valley Market is coming alive with lots of new ideas and products the whole community can enjoy.

Having gone through several name changes since being built by Joe Mezzavilla in 1952, the Market is once again going through another change. Although ownership of the building still remains with Maple Valley’s Merlini family, ownership of the Market recently changed hands from long-time owner Gordon Gaub, who owned it from 1974-2001, to Mark Hagood. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 18, 1922

Explaining progress in coal production made at Newcastle, Supt. Ash recently said: “Whatever progress we have made is due to the intelligence and industry of our present employees, to the fair and liberal policy of the company, and to the loyal cooperation of the local mine officials, and Mr. Sterling, Welfare supervisor.”

Explaining progress in coal production made at Newcastle, Supt. Ash recently said: “Whatever progress we have made is due to the intelligence and industry of our present employees, to the fair and liberal policy of the company, and to the loyal cooperation of the local mine officials, and Mr. Sterling, Welfare supervisor.”

Supt. Simon H. Ash, of Newcastle, whose photograph appears on this page, and his organization, are “answering in figures” the question so often asked as to the ability of the rock miner to adapt himself to coal mining.

While there are, of course, many experienced coal miners in the mine, the large part of the men are from the metal mines, and though this force, both coal and rock men, have hardly been in the mine long enough to have any more than become reasonably well acquainted with the work, and have probably far from struck their full stride as far as production is concerned, they are already closely pressing the records made by the former employees who had for the most part spent years on the work and were probably as experienced a force as could be found anywhere in the district.

Actual figures from the records show that from October, 1920, to March, 1921, the last six months prior to the close down, the old forces averaged a production of 2.54 tons per man per day, with a peak or 3.18 tons during the last fifteen days of the period—and that from September to December, 1921, the first four months after reopening, and including all the difficulties of reopening, of organizing and breaking in an entirely new organization, the new forces averaged a production of 2.34 tons per day, with a peak of 2.55 tons. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 18, 1922

Mine hoist Jan 1922Material progress was made last week in excavating ground for the foundation of the new structure that is to house the big $50,000 electric hoist at Black Diamond. (more…)

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