Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for February, 2016

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, February 27, 1974

VALLEY LANDMARK: The Hobart home site of Hubert and Pat Peacock. “Peacock’s Roost,” the second floor of the second building from the left, served for 20 years as a center for square dancers. The Peacocks are now living in it, having moved from their former residence, the first building seen on the left. (VOICE photo by Lowell Lorenz.)

VALLEY LANDMARK: The Hobart home site of Hubert and Pat Peacock. “Peacock’s Roost,” the second floor of the second building from the left, served for 20 years as a center for square dancers. The Peacocks are now living in it, having moved from their former residence, the first building seen on the left. (VOICE photo by Lowell Lorenz.)

By Laura Lorenz

A Peacock family has roosted at a Hobart home site since 1888.

The original home has had its face lifted throughout the years, enabling it to keep up with the needs of the five generations it has sheltered.

The home is nestled in a horseshoe-shaped valley looking towards the Cascade foothills and its driveway leads up the hill to S.E. 208th Street, known by old-timers as the McKibbon Road, but now referred to as the cemetery road. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Tacoma News Tribune, ca. 1972-73

By Noelle Fingerson, News Tribune correspondent

BLACK DIAMOND — As one approaches the denuded area, small wispy puffs of smoke can be seen drifting skyward from the porous ground. Noticeably absent from the scene, however, are the charcoaled tree trunks usually associated with forest fires. This was the scene of a fire all right but not the kind with which Washingtonians are familiar. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, November 11, 1901

Distressing accident at the Pacific Coast Company’s works — Jacob Rose is supposed to have lost his life

Mine No. 7 produced coal until 1907 when it was shut down and the rails taken up. During the early years of World War II, the mine was re-opened by Pacific Coast Coal Co. and later operated by the Strain Coal Co.

Mine No. 7 produced coal until 1907 when it was shut down and the rails taken up. During the early years of World War II, the mine was re-opened by Pacific Coast Coal Co. and later operated by the Strain Coal Co.

Flames were discovered in Mine No. 7 of the Pacific Coast Co., at Franklin at 4 o’clock yesterday morning. The miners at work, with the exception of one man, fled to safety.

Jacob Rose, the unfortunate miner, is thought to have run in the wrong direction, and if he did, the mine officials say he must be dead.

Rose is unmarried and has worked in the mine for the past five or six years. He had the reputation of being an industrious workman.

Where the fire started

The fire started in the fourth breast of the eight level of the mine about 4 o’clock yesterday morning. A canvas stretched across the breast became ignited in some inconceivable way and soon the flames spread to the timbers in the tunnel, and to the loose coal strewn about. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, February 22, 1922

New Pacific Coast Coal Co logo - 1927The company regrets that the necessity has arisen to suspend operations at Franklin Mine.

The probability of having to take such action had been recognized and had been under consideration for several weeks past, but because of the excellent work done by the men and officials at that property the company had been reluctant to reach such decision and has only done so after all reasonable means of avoiding it have been considered, and found impracticable. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, February 22, 1922

By Geo. Watkin Evans, consulting coal mining engineer, Seattle

George Watkin Evans (1876-1951), 1924 Courtesy Seattle and Environs

George Watkin Evans, 1924

Prior to 1887 there was a great deal of excitement because of the alleged high grade coal beds discovered in the Raging River district, which lies southeasterly from Issaquah at distances varying from three to ten miles.

Raging River is a tributary of the Snoqualmie River and flows in a northerly direction through the center of the northeasterly portion of the King County coal fields.

The district as a whole is made up largely of steep-sided hills and rugged mountains and is a difficult and expensive field in which to prospect. The hills and mountains at the head of and on each side of Raging River contain scores of coal outcrops in many instances far up on the side of the mountains. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, February 22, 1922

New Pacific Coast Coal Co logo - 1927The installation of the new organization plans is proceeding satisfactorily. Copies of the Constitution and Standard Practices have been in the hands of the employees for several days, and everything is now ready for the selection of councilmen.

Meetings between Messrs. Irelan and Lindsey and the men for this purpose are scheduled for this week, and following these meetings, on the same day at each mine, the first council meetings will be held for organization purposes.

The meetings scheduled for this week were, Black Diamond, Feb. 20; Burnett, Feb. 21; Newcastle, Feb. 23; Issaquah, Feb. 24; Central Council meeting, Seattle, Feb. 25. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, November 18, 2008

Franklin 1902

By Bill Kombol

This photo was taken at the entrance to the Franklin No. 1 coal mine at the town of Franklin on February 19, 1902.

The coal miner who is shown was called a “rope rider” as he would ride the coal cars pulled by a steel cable (the “rope”) into and out of the mine.

At the bottom of the mine the rope rider would couple the cable to the coal car and then ride the car to the outside portal (i.e. entrance) to the mine. There he would uncouple the loaded coal car so that it could be dumped into the surface preparation plant (the tipple) where the coal would be sorted to different sizes and processed. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »