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Archive for June 29th, 2016

Originally published in The Seattle Times, June 29, 1924

By Ellis Coe

One of the most attractive short trips of the many that are available to Seattle motorists is that leading to Lake Sawyer, reached from this city by way of Kent or Auburn. Much of the highway is paved and the remainder is good gravel. Only in one or two places is the road being surfaced and no trouble is encountered in driving through. 1—A strip of woodland road leading to Lake Sawyer. 2—A picturesque island in the lake.

One of the most attractive short trips of the many that are available to Seattle motorists is that leading to Lake Sawyer, reached from this city by way of Kent or Auburn. Much of the highway is paved and the remainder is good gravel. Only in one or two places is the road being surfaced and no trouble is encountered in driving through. 1—A strip of woodland road leading to Lake Sawyer. 2—A picturesque island in the lake.

Lake retreat calls camper to its shores

Beauty spot, reached by way of Kent, is popular place for Sunday motor parties

Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn, juvenile heroes of Mark Twain’s famous novels, are said to have spent their most enjoyable hours during dog days, when the summer sun beat down on the woods and prairies and the dogs “went mad.” During those days, the pair disported themselves at the old swimmin’ hole and in the wild berry patches, young Sawyer unencumbered with school duties and Huck Finn enjoying his usual year-‘round liberties.

Lake Sawyer, some distance beyond the end of the pavement leading out of Kent, might well have been named after Tom Sawyer. It is a paradise for boys, young and old. Girls, also young and old, find keen enjoyment there. (more…)

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