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Archive for August, 2016

Originally published in The Coast, August 1906

Union PacificA battle royal is now going on in Seattle for supremacy among railroads, upon the behalf of those not in to get in and upon the behalf of those now in to maintain the rights and privileges with which the people of the city have endowed them in the past.

The Great Northern and the Northern Pacific Railways and the Pacific Coast Company have now vested rights in the city and in reaching the city which should not be molested nor disturbed. The Chicago, St. Paul & Milwaukee has been vested with rights and privileges which it was reasonable to give it and which are proper that it should have. Now comes a ruction and a row for what?

The Union Pacific now thinks it wants to come into Seattle. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, August 31, 1922

Three chicken eaters: Waylie Hemphill, Gen. Sales Mgr., on left; A.F. Marion, Chief Engineer Pacific Coast Company, in center; and N.D. Moore, Vice-President, at far end, are here shown smiling in anticipation of that big chicken feed at Burnett, on Labor Day.

Three chicken eaters: Waylie Hemphill, Gen. Sales Mgr., on left; A.F. Marion, Chief Engineer Pacific Coast Company, in center; and N.D. Moore, Vice-President, at far end, are here shown smiling in anticipation of that big chicken feed at Burnett, on Labor Day.

We are all going to have a good time at Burnett on next Monday, when the Western Washington First Aid and Mine Rescue meet is to be held at that camp.

Burnett, apparently out to make a record in hospitality, has increased the list of sports to be given on that day, until about everything that could possibly go with such an outing has been included.

Games for everybody, old and young, large or small, chicken dinner, music, a grand ball, problems in relief and rescue for which picked teams have been training for weeks, special events calculated to keep the fun going all day, and most of the night, free ice cream and candies for the youngsters, races for cash prizes, special motion picture show, and contests designed to stir the mirth of the most sad—these are only a few of the good things down on the bill of fare.

The program, as amplified, includes at least a dozen sports not originally included, and will keep things moving at least until 1 a.m., when the Grand Ball, given at the hotel, will close. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, August 30, 1941

Mr. and Mrs. F.W. Cobb were evicted from the upper house, after living there thirteen years, to make way for the Black Diamond housing project. They took a run-down place (lower) and devoted $600 and their summer vacations to put it in shape. This week the housing project was abandoned, and the Cobbs’ old home still remains vacant.

Mr. and Mrs. F.W. Cobb were evicted from the upper house, after living there thirteen years, to make way for the Black Diamond housing project. They took a run-down place (lower) and devoted $600 and their summer vacations to put it in shape. This week the housing project was abandoned, and the Cobbs’ old home still remains vacant.

While the New Deal receives compliments on saving the public money by abandoning the Black Diamond housing project, Mr. and Mrs. F.W. Cobb, one of fourteen Black Diamond families evicted to make way for the project, have dug into their pockets for $600 they needn’t have spent—thanks to the mix up.

When eviction notices were given, the fourteen families scurried to buy run-down houses. Many are still repairing them in a race against winter weather. Other families moved into what they thought would be temporary quarters until the project was completed.

This week, however, John Carmody, Federal Works Administration, stopped all preparations for the housing project. Bids had already been received.

Mr. and Mrs. F.W. Cobb, who have been teaching in Black Diamond High School the past thirteen years, have spent $600 and their entire vacations because of the juggled housing plans.

The Cobbs, along with other Black Diamond families, were evicted last June from the home in which they had lived thirteen years. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, August 29, 2006

By Kathleen Kear

“Celebrate Black Diamond History” program

“Celebrate Black Diamond History” program

Rich in history, which dates back to 1884 when the California town of Nortonville moved to the Black Diamond area to mine the highest quality coal found on the West Coast, Black Diamond is celebrating that history during its annual Labor Days festivities this coming weekend Saturday, Sept. 2nd through Monday, Sept. 4th.

New to the list of Labor Day events that begin on Saturday, Sept. 2nd is the Puget Sound Blood Drive that will be held in conjunction with the annual Softball Game this year between the Black Diamond Fire Department and the community, which begins at 10 a.m. Rumor has it that the kids have been practicing quite a bit lately and are looking forward to putting the department’s “fire out!” (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, August 29, 1918

Three injured and 24 children made fatherless by disaster at Burnett

These photographs were taken of scenes at the Pacific Coast Coal Company’s mine at Burnett, Wash., last night immediately after the explosion in the mine in which twlve men were killed. No. 1—Scene at the entrance of the mine shows the crowd awaiting the arrival of rescue parties from the shaft with bodies of the victims. No. 2 is a scene below the mine entrance showing anxious relatives awaiting identification of the dead. The building at left housed the injured, who were later removed to Tacoma, while the bodies of the men killed were placed in the smaller building at the right. No. 3 is a photograph of one of the rescue parties, made up of Burnett miners after their work was completed last night.

These photographs were taken of scenes at the Pacific Coast Coal Company’s mine at Burnett, Wash., last night immediately after the explosion in the mine in which twlve men were killed. No. 1—Scene at the entrance of the mine shows the crowd awaiting the arrival of rescue parties from the shaft with bodies of the victims. No. 2 is a scene below the mine entrance showing anxious relatives awaiting identification of the dead. The building at left housed the injured, who were later removed to Tacoma, while the bodies of the men killed were placed in the smaller building at the right. No. 3 is a photograph of one of the rescue parties, made up of Burnett miners after their work was completed last night.

BURNETT, Thursday, Aug. 29—Twelve men were killed and three others seriously injured in an explosion in the mine of the Pacific Coast Coal Company here yesterday afternoon at 4 o’clock. The disaster occurred in the third level south, at a depth of about 1,000 feet, and the cause is undetermined. All the dead and injured have been removed from the mine. The dead are:

Thomas Johnson, fire boss
Claudius Tomaczat
Jacob Sippola
Mike Sladoje
Elic Tait
Gus Fleisher
Charles Makkela
Otto Makkela
Tom Flemming
Reese Jenkins
Dan Reese
George Marich

(more…)

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Originally published in The Coast, August 1906

By J.W. Bussy, Black Diamond

Jones Lake 14 - Oct 1909 - photo 578 - BDHS 2003.87It was a delightful afternoon the early part of June. A fresh breeze ruffled the waters of Lake Jones into tiny waves, as we rowed out to the middle of the stream, our destination being the inlet at the farther end of that body of water which the sinking sun was rapidly transforming into a sheet of quivering gold.

A hasty glace revealed the unwelcome fact that we were not the only “pebbles on the beach.” Indeed in the shadows of the tall firs on the opposite shore were dimly outlined no less than three other boats, each with its eager angler. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, September [day unknown], 2004

By Barbara Nilson

Labor Day button 2004Cream pies, politicians, and peanuts combined to create a memorable Labor Day weekend with citizen awards and plaques for parade winners. Ninety-one-year old Inez Aden was voted the Lifetime Commitment Award for her years of devotion to the Community Center. She said she had lived in Black Diamond for 91 years and she was shocked by this award.

Labor Day Committee Director Leih Mulvihill was honored as Citizen of the Year for her years of work with the Labor Day for her years of work with the Labor Day event as well as her participation in the Maple Valley Chamber of Commerce, Hooked on Fishing committee, Black Diamond Merchant’s Association, newly elected to the City Planning Commission and other community services. Mulvihill responded with “I love this town!” (more…)

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