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Archive for October, 2016

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, October 31, 1921

John G. Schoning, representative of U.S. Bureau of Mines, and his famous truck, Mine Rescue truck, No. 3

John G. Schoning, representative of U.S. Bureau of Mines, and his famous truck, Mine Rescue truck, No. 3

John G. Schoning, representative of U.S. Bureau of Mines, began examining applicants for Mine Rescue and First aid teams at Issaquah last week.

The federal representative had intended to begin his work at Issaquah the week before, but was called out of the state on important business and the training had to be postponed.

Last Monday, however, Mr. Schoning and his famous rescue truck put in an appearance at the camp, and the examinations were at once started. Many sought certificates on both teams, and their general caliber seemed fully up to the high standard set recently at Newcastle, where thirty-four men won diplomas.

Mr. Schoning conducted his training and examinations with his usual care, and the names of the winners will be given in the Bulletin next week. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, October 31, 1951

great-northernThe Great Northern Railway Co. today completed purchase of the historic pacific Coast Railroad Co. and announced it will assume operations of the road at midnight tonight.

The purchase, for $1,700,000, was accomplished at a corporate meeting here this afternoon at which the officers and directors of the Pacific Coast firm resigned and were succeeded by Great Northern personnel.

Thomas Balmer vice president and Western counsel for the Great Northern, became president of the Pacific Coast line.

I.E. Manion, Great Northern general manager of lines West, was named vice president in charge of operation. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, October 28, 1993

The railroad depot at Cedar Falls, where extra engines were added to eastbound trains, bore the town’s name in foot-high electric letters.

The railroad depot at Cedar Falls, where extra engines were added to eastbound trains, bore the town’s name in foot-high electric letters.

Not only did a river run through it, but so did the railroad and a whole lot of power from the nation’s first publicly-owned hydroelectric plant.

It was like living on Walton’s Mountain, only with more people.

Cedar Falls wasn’t totally cut off from the Big City or the Big Wars or the Depression. In a very vital way, the tiny community in the Cascade foothills above North Bend was linked to all that.

“Cedar Falls was a unique little town that was created and flourished in the first half of the 20th century and then essentially disappeared in the face of changes in society and technology that erased its reason for existence,” wrote Marian Thompson Arlin and Dorothy Graybael Scott. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, October 26, 2011

The original Krain tavern and boarding house, circa 1900. Constructed in the 1890s, the building was torn down in 1907.

The original Krain tavern and boarding house, circa 1900. Constructed in the 1890s, the building was torn down in 1907.

By Brenda Sexton

Nearly every day at the Krain Corner Inn, owner Karen Hatch gets a history lesson.

Through the 22 years she’s owned the restaurant at the corner of State Route 169 and Southeast 400th Street, she’s collected newspaper articles, photographs and saved the personal letters folks have written about their visit to the historic building and the area of Krain. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, October 26, 2011

krain-coverBy Brenda Sexton

There was a time when the Plateau was covered with bustling, individual communities.

Most had their own school house, community or dance hall and store. They may have had a church, saloon or specialty shop. Most had a band or baseball team. Some had both.

They were filled with farmers, miners and loggers, most arriving from Europe.

Each community had its own heart and soul.

Those areas still serve as reference points for those who live in the Enumclaw area. Ask many today where they live and chances are they will answer with names like Veazie, Osceola, Wabash, Selleck, Birch, Franklin, Flensted, Cumberland, Boise and Krain. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, October 30, 1914

The first resident pastor, Rev. James Robinson, assisted in the dedication of the church from October 17 to October 21, 1914, with official dedication recognition by the Seattle Presbytery on December 17, 1914.

The first resident pastor, Rev. James Robinson, assisted in the dedication of the church from October 17 to October 21, 1914, with official dedication recognition by the Seattle Presbytery on December 17, 1914.

The first wedding in the new Presbyterian Church at Black Diamond was solemnized at high noon Sunday, October 25, when Miss Beatrice Jones, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John O. Jones, and Mr. Lindley O. Newton were united in marriage by Rev. W.H. Hoole, pastor of the church. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, October 24, 2001

By Brenda Sexton

The Krain cemetery has been used by Plateau families for generations, but is filled up. That problem is being solved by using space within the cemetery for additional burial plots. The photo above shows the oldest grave marker in the cemetery, dated 1891.

The Krain cemetery has been used by Plateau families for generations, but is filled up. That problem is being solved by using space within the cemetery for additional burial plots. The photo above shows the oldest grave marker in the cemetery, dated 1891.

When Eileen Francis Verhonick died in August at the age of 80, she was buried with her family at Holy Family Cemetery in the Plateau’s Krain area.

Verhonick and a number of families like hers have held burial plots at the Krain cemetery since the 1800s. Just a few steps away from Verhonick’s final resting place lies the oldest marker, that of Mary Kump (born Jan. 4, 1890, died Jan. 15, 1891).

Verhonick, Kump and others like them are buried at Holy Family Cemetery because their ancestors are there. According to Sacred Heart Catholic Church’s faith formation leader Mathew Weisbeck, when the cemetery was first formed it was designed so family groups would stay together. Today, there are about 42 family areas there, each with about eight burial spots.

Getting an accurate count on how many people are buried there now is difficult, but Weisbeck said approximately 267, and, for all practical purposes, the cemetery is full.

Until now. (more…)

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