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Archive for November 21st, 2016

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, November 21, 1921

New Pacific Coast Coal Co logo - 1927Mr. Wm. M. Barnum, president of The Pacific Coast Company, of which the Pacific Coast Coal Company is a subsidiary, was recently in Seattle for a few days, during which time he visited the Issaquah and Black Diamond mines. Lack of time prevented a visit to the other mines.

Mr. Barnum had an opportunity of seeing many of the men at the two mines mentioned, and of talking with them, and was particularly impressed with the personnel of the new organization, speaking in commendatory terms of the progress which it has made in reopening the mines. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, June 16, 2015

By Bill Kombol

Four loggers sit in the completed undercut, with two supporting themselves on springboards.

Four loggers sit in the completed undercut, with two supporting themselves on springboards.

While coal mining drove the early development and growth of much of southeast King County, logging was nearly as important. Most of the Puget Sound region was blanketed with old growth forests, featuring some of the largest trees in the world growing in the moist, temperate climate of Western Washington.

However, felling these giants of nature required the ingenuity of early loggers, plus a whole lot of muscle. Shown here is a Douglas-fir tree prepared to be fallen, likely in the early 1900s.

To cut down such a mammoth tree first required several deep notches, typically cut out with axes. Into these notches “springboards” were inserted on each side of the tree often 6 to 12 feet above ground level. This avoided having to cut through the swollen butt of a typical old growth. (more…)

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