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Archive for December, 2016

Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, December 31, 1948

Shots traded with deputy before manhunt

Suspect jailed: Matthew Pearl, suffering a bullet wound in his shoulder, was booked at the King County jail by Sheriff’s Capt. John Day. (Seattle Times)

Suspect jailed: Matthew Pearl, suffering a bullet wound in his shoulder, was booked at the King County jail by Sheriff’s Capt. John Day. (Seattle Times)

Deputy sheriffs armed with submachine guns and tear gas were rushed to Black Diamond early this morning to take part in a manhunt for a young man who exchanged shots with a deputy a short time earlier.

While waiting for reinforcements, Deputies Vince Hansen and Barton Dailey herded the patrons of a tavern into a nearby store to keep them off the street in case there was more shooting.

“He knows where we are, but we don’t know where he is,” Hansen radioed the sheriff’s office at 2 a.m. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 11, 1922

By Harry J. Scott

New Pacific Coast Coal Co logo - 1927The infant 1922 was given an auspicious sendoff in this man’s town. Everything necessary to an enjoyable and successful “Hi Jinks” dance was in evidence when the Clubroom was opened to the guests on Saturday evening.

Bernhard’s orchestra, the same aggregation of artists who furnished the music at our previous dance, was on hand attired in appropriate Hi Jinks costumes, and again delivered the same brand of high grade music for which they are noted. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, December 29, 1971

By William A. Ziegner

Joe’s old Maple Valley General Store being moved (top) to make way for Serve-U’s expansion in 1959. And below, of course, the area as it looks today.

Joe’s old Maple Valley General Store being moved (top) to make way for Serve-U’s expansion in 1959. And below, of course, the area as it looks today.

Once in a while, the Voice gets around to what is called a personality sketch. It’s high time we came up with another one and past high time that we bang out a few words about the now 75-year-old civic leader, who has often been called (and still is) “the Mayor of Maple Valley.”

He’s Joe Mezzavilla, of course, who still makes his own wine, still keeps on the go every day, all day, and still has the same friendly smile and charm he had with this writer first met him in about 1952.

Joe at that time was proprietor of the old Sure-Fine Cash Store, occupying a frame building next to where the present Serve-U is located, at first about half today’s size. Joe waited on his customers himself most of the time. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, December 29, 1976

Rob Blacker, artist, is shown beside a 1,400-pound bronze sculpture as it was being put into place at the King County Lake Wilderness Park earlier this month. The work was commissioned by the King County Art Commission. (Photo by Bob Gerbing.)

Rob Blacker, artist, is shown beside a 1,400-pound bronze sculpture as it was being put into place at the King County Lake Wilderness Park earlier this month. The work was commissioned by the King County Art Commission. (Photo by Bob Gerbing.)

A 1,400-pound bronze sculpture, commissioned last spring by the King County Arts Commission, was installed at the King County Lake Wilderness Park on Saturday, December 11 by the artist, Rob Blacker, 25, with the help of his partner, Jerry Allen, and other friends. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, December 28, 1923

Giant booze plant found by raiders

Government agents destroy King County liquor plant with capacity of 150 gallons a day

Huge moonshine plant seized by U.S. agents: Building housing the largest distillery plant ever seized in the state was burned by federal officers yesterday on a ranch midway between Auburn and Enumclaw. The distillery was so constructed, with its many vats, pipes, and oil burner, that it couldn’t be dismantled without destroying the building it was in. The upper photograph shows an interior corner and four vats which held various kinds of mash for the 800-gallon cooker or still. The lower one shows the building in flames.

Huge moonshine plant seized by U.S. agents: Building housing the largest distillery plant ever seized in the state was burned by federal officers yesterday on a ranch midway between Auburn and Enumclaw. The distillery was so constructed, with its many vats, pipes, and oil burner, that it couldn’t be dismantled without destroying the building it was in. The upper photograph shows an interior corner and four vats which held various kinds of mash for the 800-gallon cooker or still. The lower one shows the building in flames.

After an ambush of many hours and a spectacular raid in which nearly a score of shots were fired, federal prohibition agents sent up in smoke yesterday, in a secluded valley about three miles from Black Diamond, a distillery, which, they believe, has been one of the largest sources of moonshine in the Northwest.

The distillery, complete from top to bottom, and boasting an oil burner, occupied an entire building—a former combination barn and hop kiln—and had, it is estimated, a capacity to produce from its several vats and its 800-gallon cooker, or still, about 150 gallons a day, which would bring its daily net earnings, considering the bootleggers’ quoted wholesale price, to approximately $900.

Nothing had been overlooked by the moonshiners in their apparent effort to manufacturer a good grade of liquor in great quantities and in varieties in the quickest possible time. There were vats for corn mash, for rye, for prune and for sugar mash, and a piping and valve system which made it possible for one man to operate the plant at top production. The value of the plant was estimated at about $10,000, including contents. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, December 28, 1922

By Geo. Watkin Evans, consulting coal mining engineer, Seattle

George Watkin Evans (1876-1951), 1924 Courtesy Seattle and Environs

George Watkin Evans, 1924

On the northwestern slope of Mt. Baker, a few miles south of the boundary line between United States and Canada, is a deposit of coal measures containing lenses of very good quality of anthracite coal. In addition to the anthracite, outcrops of high grade bituminous coals have also been found.

The area in which these coal outcrops occur is mountainous and forms the high foothills of the western slope of the Cascade Mountains. The district is drained by the Nooksack River and its tributaries, Glacier and Cornell creeks.

To date no one can state definitely the extent of these coal deposits, but they evidently cover eight or ten square miles and probably more. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, December 28, 1922

Black Diamond hospital, ca. 1922, which still stands on Lawson Street, across the street.

Black Diamond hospital, ca. 1922, which still stands on Lawson Street.

Louis Phelps, who suffered a broken leg on December 18, which was mended by Dr. H.L. Botts at the Black Diamond hospital, is reported getting along famously. With him was Paul Roberts of Burnett, also laid up with a broken leg, the two enjoying each other’s company for Christmas.

While hospitals are not ordinarily thought of as pleasure resorts, the efficient staff at the company hospital at Black Diamond makes that place most desirable for those laid up by illness or injury. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, December 27, 1964

By Lucile McDonald

This is the farm near Hobart where Bill Peacock spent his boyhood. The farm now belongs to his nephew. A rail line once ran through pasture in foreground.

This is the farm near Hobart where Bill Peacock spent his boyhood. The farm now belongs to his nephew. A rail line once ran through pasture in foreground.

From high places around Hobart, where Bill Peacock has spent 77 of his nearly 80 years, he can view the new sweep of the Echo Lake cutoff highway and automobiles traveling along it at a fast clip.

The final section penetrates foothill country that not too long ago had only roads made with pick, shovel and wheelbarrow.

Peacock used to travel a long circuit over them once a week making meat deliveries. He believes he was the first person to drive a team and wagon into some of the communities along the Pacific Coast Railroad. The branch line later was torn up and the towns are now defunct. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, December 28, 1888

The morning session included an address by the conductor, W.J. Watkins, who stated the origin and advantages of the Eisteddfod.

The morning session included an address by the conductor, W.J. Watkins, who stated the origin and advantages of the Eisteddfod.

BLACK DIAMOND, Dec. 26 – The object of the Eisteddfod is to develop and encourage the literary and musical tastes and talents of the Welsh people. Its origin dates back to the 12th century, and it generally consists of competition in essays, orations, poetry, and music.

The morning session yesterday opened by an address by the chairman, W.P. Morgans, followed by an address by the conductor, W.J. Watkins, who stated the origin and advantages of the Eisteddfod. This was followed by a song by Howell T. Jones, the adjudicator on music.

Next came poetical salutations by the poets present to the Eisteddfod. In the competitive duet, “Climb, Climb Higher,” the prize was awarded to Richard Hughes and R. Roberts, of Black Diamond. This was the first prize ever awarded in Washington Territory by this institution. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, December 21, 1922

xmas-bulletinThrough the Christmas Number of the Bulletin we are glad of the opportunity to extend a personal word of greeting to all those who make up the family of the Pacific Coast Coal Company, and to commend the spirit of loyalty and cooperation that has been so much in evidence during the year now drawing to a close.

This spirit has not only contributed materially to the success of our new organization but it has resulted in greater happiness and contentment for us all.

For many at the camps this is the second Christmas with the company. To these and to the new men who have joined forces with us during the year, and to their families, we extend our cordial greetings and best wishes for a Merry Christmas and happiness throughout the New Year.

D.C. Botting
N.D. Moore
E.C. Ward (more…)

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