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Archive for February, 2017

Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, February 28, 1893

The pit filled with water, very near a fatal accident

Work in the Franklin mines has been interrupted during the past week by water which has flooded the pit and far exceeded the capacity of the pump. Superintendent T.B. Corey has spent a part of the week at Franklin to assist Superintendent W.P. Williams to overcoming the difficulty. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, February 26, 1893

The Hanson-Turnbull wedding: A “hard times” entertainment

The likely location of the ball was the Masonic Lodge (left of center, ca. 1915). The photographer was looking up Baker St. toward Third Ave. (The Congregational Church is to the right; St. Barbara’s in the background.) Today’s Masonic Hall resides in the same location.

The Masonic Hall, left of center, ca. 1915. The photographer was looking up Baker St. toward Third Ave. (The Congregational Church is to the right; St. Barbara’s in the background.) Today’s Masonic Hall resides in the same location.

Mr. Alexander G. Hanson and Miss Jeanie J. Turnbull were married in the Masonic hall at Black Diamond on Tuesday evening by Rev. H.T. Shepard. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, February 26, 1975

Old and new at Ravensdale: An attractive, modern post office, above, is the latest addition to the community of Ravensdale. (Photo by Kevin McLellan.)

Old and new at Ravensdale: An attractive, modern post office, above, is the latest addition to the community of Ravensdale. (Photo by Kevin McLellan.)

A modern, well lighted building, with lots of room and a pump for air-conditioning and heat has now replaced the old, wooden-structured Ravensdale post office.

Wendell C. Johnson, postmaster, says he and three other employees have already moved in and the new facility is open for business. (more…)

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Originally published in Voice of the Valley, September 16, 2008

One of the most fascinating stories to come from the Franklin coal mines involved a mule named ‘Bess,’ who was employed at the Cannon mine on the banks of the Green River.

One of the most fascinating stories to come from the Franklin coal mines involved a mule named ‘Bess,’ who was employed at the Cannon mine on the banks of the Green River.

By Bill Kombol

Coal miners Andrew Chernick and Mike Babcanik reported for work in the pre-dawn hours of February 16, 1914. Around 9 a.m., the water-soaked earth gave way and tons of liquefied mud and rock enveloped the two miners. Three days later the body of the 50-year-old Chernick was found and the 47-year-old Babcanik was presumed dead.

On that same day a story appeared in the Seattle Star exposing how mules at the Cannon mine were required to work 24 hours a day and never allowed outside. A photo of the emaciated Bess the mule appeared on the front page. Subsequent stories followed and the Humane Society eventually “arrested” the mule, releasing Bess for needed rest and forage outside the mine. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the valley, February 23, 1977

By D’Ann Pedee

Dream a reality—The brand new Tahoma swimming pool will be opened to the public on Thursday, March 3, at 1 p.m. The $825,000 facility is the 15th Forward Thrust swimming pool in the King County Parks System. A wide range of aquatic programs will be offered at the new pool including public swimming, adult and senior citizen swimming, special swims, swimming lessons, swim team, handicapped activities, membership, and rentals. (Photo by Bob Gerbing.)

Dream a reality—The brand new Tahoma swimming pool will be opened to the public on Thursday, March 3, at 1 p.m. The $825,000 facility is the 15th Forward Thrust swimming pool in the King County Parks System. A wide range of aquatic programs will be offered at the new pool including public swimming, adult and senior citizen swimming, special swims, swimming lessons, swim team, handicapped activities, membership, and rentals. (Photo by Bob Gerbing.)

Prayer, pomp, and important personage will mark the official opening of the Tahoma Forward Thrust Swimming Pool on Thursday, March 3, at 1 p.m.

Although the $825,000 pool has been scheduled to open quite a few times since 1976, the band will not play “Bridge Over Troubled Waters.” Instead, an uplifting note will be heard as the Tahoma band offers “The Star Spangled Banner” and possibly “Out to Sea” from Jaws as part of its prelude.

County dignitaries who will address the guests are King County Executive John Spellman and County Councilman Dave Mooney. Along with Tahoma School Supt. Joe Tobin, they will cut the ribbon signaling the start of some exhibition swimming, followed by two free public swim sessions. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, February 22, 1889

Several more claims filed, a find of galena ore

fire-clayMr. James W. Bird, engineer of the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad, and four others have located mining claims in township 21, range 6 east, between Black Diamond and Franklin, in which are situated four veins of fire clay, which have recently been discovered there. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, February 22, 1923

delivering-briquets-in-snow-2-22-1923If all obstacles to the future sale and delivery of coal are overcome in the same thorough and efficient manner in which the Sales Department, under Sales Manager Wylie Hemphill and his able corps of assistants, conquered the fury of the elements and filled every order for coal during the blizzard of last week, there need be little concern about the ability of the sales force to keep the mines working.

In the picture shown above you see one of the ingenuous methods employed to furnish fuel, when many coal concerns were tied up entirely, making no effort to undertake deliveries of orders. (more…)

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