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Archive for February 17th, 2017

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, February 3, 2015

By Bill Kombol

The Cannon mine, ca. 1915, was named for an executive with Pacific Coast Co. It began operations in 1913 and closed in 1922.

The Cannon mine, ca. 1915, was named for an executive with Pacific Coast Co. It began operations in 1913 and closed in 1922.

The Cannon mine in Franklin operated on the Gem and McKay coal seams, both lying on the east side of Green River. In 1914 the Cannon mine was connected by a 1,225-foot rock tunnel to the Franklin Gem and all the coal was processed in joint facilities.

While the coal processing facilities and the railroad were all on the west side of the river, the Cannon mine was on the east side. Hence, this bridge across Green River was constructed to bring coal out of the mine, cross the river, and then hoisted up an incline to coal bunkers near the Columbia & Puget Sound railroad. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, March 2, 2010

Cannon Mine coal bunkers in the coal mining town of Franklin, as it nears completion around 1912-13.

Cannon Mine coal bunkers in the coal mining town of Franklin, as it nears completion around 1912-13.

By Bill Kombol

The Cannon mine was named in honor of Henry W. Cannon, a former president of Pacific Coast Company who served as chairman of the board of directors. Driving the gangway for the Cannon mine commenced on the Gem coal seam in 1910, about the same time that this new bunker with all modern equipment was first conceived.

Franklin was a coal mining town situated above the Green River Gorge where coal was first discovered by Victor Tull in July 1880 and coal shipments commenced in July 1883.

This image comes from the Pacific Coast Company collection, photo No. 41 and is also known as Museum of History and Industry (MOHAI) No. 19182.

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