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Archive for March 14th, 2017

Originally published in the Issaquah Press, March 14, 1990

Take a look at the elder Paul Kos’ huge, work-worn hands holding baby Paul and you could probably guess that the Kos family is a part of Issaquah’s coal mining history. This photo taken in 1908, shows Mr. Kos in his prime surrounded by his family (daughter Rose Kos Croston, wife Rose Kos, and sons Frank and Paul Kos). Photo courtesy of Paul Kos.

Take a look at the elder Paul Kos’ huge, work-worn hands holding baby Paul and you could probably guess that the Kos family is a part of Issaquah’s coal mining history. This photo taken in 1908, shows Mr. Kos in his prime surrounded by his family (daughter Rose Kos Croston, wife Rose Kos, and sons Frank and Paul Kos). Photo courtesy of Paul Kos.

Around the turn of the century, Paul Kos left his wife and family behind in Yugoslavia (then Austria-Hungary) to find a better life in America. He came to the coal mines in Ravensdale, south of Issaquah.

The first words Kos learned in English were “hurry up!” Working 10 hour-days for $2.50 a day it took him five years to save up enough to bring Rose and the two oldest children over.

In 1912, the family moved to Issaquah to take advantage of the town’s coal boom. Single miners lived in rooming houses or in the tent city along the creek, but the Kos family bought the “horseshoe” house at First Avenue NE and Bush Street. (more…)

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