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Archive for April 14th, 2017

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, April 14, 1953

Craft has 22 military passengers

Stewardess safe: Mrs. Adra Long, stewardess on a twin-engined transport plan which crashed near Selleck this morning; nearly collapsed in the arms of a rescuer, Don Puckett, when she was found walking on a road eight miles from the wreckage of the plane several hours after the crash. Mrs. Long suffered a deep cut in her leg.

Stewardess safe: Mrs. Adra Long, stewardess on a twin-engined transport plan which crashed near Selleck this morning, nearly collapsed in the arms of a rescuer, Don Puckett, when she was found walking on a road eight miles from the wreckage of the plane several hours after the crash. Mrs. Long suffered a deep cut in her leg.

A twin-engined plane carrying 22 soldiers and three crew members crashed about 2:30 o’clock this morning in the Cedar River watershed.

A Coast Guard plane sighted the wreckage at noon.

A survivor, rescued by helicopter, said the pilot, copilot, and four passengers were dead. He thought the others all survived.

The plane was a DC-3 owned by Miami Airline, Inc., Miami, Fla. The pilot had radioed at 2:22 o’clock that he was lost, one engine had failed and he was dropping fast.

The passengers boarded the plane at Washington, D.C., and Scranton, Pa. The plane was bound for Seattle’s Boeing Field.

The wreckage was sighted on a snowy slope in the Cascades foothills, 10 ½ miles east of Selleck, south-central King County.

The survivor, Odell Matthews, a Washington, D.C., soldier, was flown to the Selleck school in a Coast Guard helicopter. He had a back injury.

Another survivor was the plane’s stewardess, Adra Long, Berkeley, Calif. A helicopter flew her to Selleck alter she was sighted walking on a road eight miles from the plane wreckage.

Rescuers were converting the two-story frame Selleck school into a hospital The Coast Guard and State Patrol took doctors from Seattle by automobile.

The passengers presumably were soldiers bound for the Far East. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, April 14, 1930

Company, state, and federal investigators say they are at loss to otherwise explain accident

Sketch of mine disaster—The artist’s sketch shows how the explosion killed seventeen miners in the Carbonado mine. The Douty vein of coal, where the blast occurred, is directly under the town, yet it was not felt on the surface. To reach the Douty workings, miners go down a 600-foot counterbalance to the mine entrance beside the Carbon River, then 800 feet through a rock tunnel, down another counterbalance and along another tunnel to the diggings.

Sketch of mine disaster—The artist’s sketch shows how the explosion killed seventeen miners in the Carbonado mine. The Douty vein of coal, where the blast occurred, is directly under the town, yet it was not felt on the surface. To reach the Douty workings, miners go down a 600-foot counterbalance to the mine entrance beside the Carbon River, then 800 feet through a rock tunnel, down another counterbalance and along another tunnel to the diggings.

Death, flying through a section of the Carbonado coal mine on a spark, carefully locked away from human knowledge the real cause of the disaster which Saturday evening killed seventeen miners.

Company, state, federal, and miners’ representatives today had been unable to explain the tragedy. There were no survivors. Every man who might have given a clue was killed. Other workers were too far from the Douty seam where the blast occurred, to give an explanation. (more…)

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