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Archive for April 18th, 2017

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, April 18, 1953

By Ed Guthman

Stewardess grateful: Mrs. Adra Long, stewardess on the DC-3 transport that crashed Tuesday near Selleck, told three Selleck women who gave her first aid how much she appreciated what they did. Mrs. Long, recovering from leg cuts and bruises in Enumclaw Memorial Hospital, is shown at lower left as she looked when she collapsed in the arms of her rescuer, Lieut. Comdr. Robert T. Norris, Tuesday. The three women from left, Mrs. Bob Sayers, Mrs. Don Lennon, and Mrs. Fred Pettersen visited Mrs. Long to return a red coat Mrs. Long wore when she was rescued. They told Mrs. Long they had been struck by the fact that when she reached Selleck after her harrowing hike from the crash she still was wearing lipstick. Mrs. Long, who had hiked eight miles before being found, told the Selleck women she thought she would fly again.

Stewardess grateful: Mrs. Adra Long, stewardess on the DC-3 transport that crashed Tuesday near Selleck, told three Selleck women who gave her first aid how much she appreciated what they did. Mrs. Long, recovering from leg cuts and bruises in Enumclaw Memorial Hospital, is shown at lower left as she looked when she collapsed in the arms of her rescuer, Lieut. Comdr. Robert T. Norris, Tuesday. The three women from left, Mrs. Bob Sayers, Mrs. Don Lennon, and Mrs. Fred Pettersen visited Mrs. Long to return a red coat Mrs. Long wore when she was rescued. They told Mrs. Long they had been struck by the fact that when she reached Selleck after her harrowing hike from the crash she still was wearing lipstick. Mrs. Long, who had hiked eight miles before being found, told the Selleck women she thought she would fly again.

“The thing that sticks in my mind is that not one of those boys complained—and they had something to complain about.”

“That helicopter pilot was some man. How he flew that thing! I never saw anything like it.”

“For pluck, I’ll take the stewardess. There was a brave girl.”

“I took a look at the first boy they brought in on the helicopter. It was enough. I couldn’t bring myself to look at the others.”

That was the way the conversation went yesterday in Selleck, the peaceful logging community 18 miles southeast of Renton that became a hustling headquarters for the rescue Tuesday of survivors of a DC-3 plane crash on Cedar Mountain. (more…)

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