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Archive for April 19th, 2017

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, December 7, 2010

By Bill Kombol

The Miller boarding house was located about 500 feet east of Miller’s saloon, known as Ben’s Place.

The Miller boarding house was located about 500 feet east of Miller’s saloon, known as Ben’s Place.

This photo shows the 17-room boarding house belonging to Ben and LuLu (McCracken) Miller, which operated near a coal-mining town called Naco, the home of the Navy mine operations on the Naval coal seams.

Originally known as Sunset, the name was changed to Navy in 1908, and in 1916 the Northern Pacific railroad coined the term Naco for the railway stop. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, April 19, 1953

By William Plunkett
Times staff correspondent

Remarkable recovery: Pvt. Robert Lynch showed as much interest when he wiggled his toes as Capt. James Berger, center, and Col. Knox Dunlap, his surgeon. Lynch’s feet nearly were severed in the plane crash near Selleck Tuesday. Now, after the operation, he is expected to walk again. The casts on his legs were cut open so circulation to the damaged tissues would not be cut off. He was given a blood transfusion while the doctors examined him. Captain Berger was one of five doctors at the crash scene.

Remarkable recovery: Pvt. Robert Lynch showed as much interest when he wiggled his toes as Capt. James Berger, center, and Col. Knox Dunlap, his surgeon. Lynch’s feet nearly were severed in the plane crash near Selleck Tuesday. Now, after the operation, he is expected to walk again. The casts on his legs were cut open so circulation to the damaged tissues would not be cut off. He was given a blood transfusion while the doctors examined him. Captain Berger was one of five doctors at the crash scene.

MADIGAN ARMY HOSPITAL, April 18—When Pvt. Robert Lynch wiggled his toes here yesterday, staff members gasped in amazement and marveled at the work of Madigan’s chief orthopedic surgeon, Col. Knox Dunlap.

Lynch, a survivor of the Selleck plane crash, entered the hospital with the bones in his ankles severed, his feet hanging only by frozen tendons. (more…)

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