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Archive for May, 2017

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 31, 1923

While the miner digs the coal and the men at the bunkers see that it is properly prepared for shipment, there are some very important men mid-way between these two, without whom it would be almost impossible to keep the coal moving.

In the picture shown above the Bulletin presents three representatives of the men we refer to, namely: Harold Cooper, sprager; Ralph Walker, oiler; and Wm. Himes, motorman. The fact that each of them has just received the latest Bulletin is not the sole reason they are smiling, for in about five more minutes the whistle will blow, the signal for a dash to the “dry,” a shower and then everything will be ready for supper.


No plans for Fourth of July celebration

No definite plans for the celebration of the Fourth of July at any of the camps have yet been announced.

The magnitude of the celebration which is to be staged in Seattle, including the visit of President Harding, is expected to be such a drawing card that there is not much sentiment apparent in favor of a big inter-camp picnic. The matter of celebrating the day is now up to the camps and decision for a joint or individual celebration will shortly be made.

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, May 30, 1896

Broad-gauge road to mines

Extensive improvements in view in Seattle on the company’s dockage—Ballast Island will have a fireproof brick warehouse

With the reorganization of the Oregon Improvement Company, whose principal holdings are at Seattle and in King County, are to come important and far-reaching improvements. The plan of reorganization has already been announced in New York as perfected by the committee of reorganization.

The old company is to be closed out and the new company with the old security-holders will buy it in, the old holders of security taking new stock in the proportion agreed upon. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, May 1944

Home from battle: First Lieut. Walter L. Gibson of Black Diamond is home on a brief furlough following his arrival from the European theater of war. He has completed his fifty combat missions.

Home from battle: First Lieut. Walter L. Gibson of Black Diamond is home on a brief furlough following his arrival from the European theater of war. He has completed his fifty combat missions.

Having completed his fifty combat missions overseas, First Lieut. Walter L. Gibson, Army Air Forces, of Black Diamond is home for a short furlough. He arrived home April 25 and will depart May 15 for the Santa Monica, Calif., redistribution center where he will be reassigned to duty.

Lt. Gibson was bombardier on a Liberator bomber. He will put in for pilot’s training at the redistribution center.

His tour of duty overseas took him to Cairo, Palestine, and North Africa. While on leave he visited Nazareth, the Jordan River, and took a row boat ride on the Sea of Galilee.

Overseas 9 months, Lt. Gibson together with the plane and its crew flew to North Africa from the United States via Iceland and England. The plane and its crew operated with its squadron out of North Africa on missions over Greece, Bulgaria, Austria, Hungary, Italy, France and Germany.

On the famous raid on the great German airplane plant at Regensburg Gibson was the lead bombardier upon whose bomb release the rest of the squadron’s planes bombs were dropped. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, May 28, 1977

Sketch shows concession stand in front of bathhouse.

Sketch shows concession stand in front of bathhouse.

The famed dance hall at the former Gaffney’s Lake Wilderness Resort, now a King County park, is doomed.

It will be torn down in a few weeks during an improvement project for the park being carried out by the Carl Humphrey Construction Co. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, May 27, 1906

Grading expected to be far enough advanced by that time to permit contractors to construct new tracks

Right-of-way through Cedar River Valley will be improved as soon as the franchise ordinance permits

Line reaching for Tacoma beyond Black River Junction will parallel the Puget Sound Electric Company

Actual track laying will commence on the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul’s line in this state by fall. Grading on the extension up Cedar River Valley from the point near Maple Valley where the St. Paul leaves the tracks of the Columbia & Puget Sound, will begin as soon as the company is notified of the approval of its franchise ordinance.

The camps will be established within a few days. The mills of the state are so busy with orders for rail and cargo shipment that they will be unable to handle the big contract the St. Paul will have to let. As a result a number of portable mills will be sent into the woods along the right of way of the St. Paul and ties will be gotten out at convenient points. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 24, 1923

Every mine has its firebosses, but Newcastle is willing to stack its supervisory force against that of any other mine in the world, confident of winning first honors anywhere. To back up their boasts they present herewith the photograph of a group taken recently, most of whom had just come off shift. From left to right they are:

A. Elmer Anderson, Dick Richards, Mine Foreman Chas. Lumley, John Eck, Joe Daler, Wm. Bowie, and W.E. Jones. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, July 1991

House on Issaquah-Hobart Road where George Weyerhaeuser was hidden for seven days when the 8-year-old was kidnapped in 1935. (Photo by Barbara Nilson.)

House on Issaquah-Hobart Road where George Weyerhaeuser was hidden for seven days when the 8-year-old was kidnapped in 1935. (Photo by Barbara Nilson.)

By Barbara Nilson

It was announced this month that George Weyerhaeuser, chief executive officer of the timber-industry that bears his family’s name, was stepping down from that position bringing to mind a time 56 years ago when he was kidnapped and hidden in a house in Hobart.

George was 8-years-old when he was walking home from Lowell School in Tacoma for lunch on May 24, 1935. He never arrived. (more…)

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