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Archive for June 4th, 2017

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, June 4, 1975

By Bill Ziegner

New breed of plane: If plans are approved, the plane shown above will one day become a familiar part of Maple Valley’s landscape and skyways. It’s the twin-engine Skytrader 800 that will be built—actually in large part only assembled—at the proposed facility in the vicinity of 244th S.E. and Highway 169. The 42-foot-long, 14-passenger, prop-driven, high-wing aircraft is noted for its short takeoff and landing capabilities. It is designed to take off after only 400 feet of roll and to land within 310 feet. With its two Lycombing 400-horsepower engines, the Skytrader has a maximum speed of 200 miles an hour and a range of 2,000 miles. The plane, with its boxcar-shaped body, features a rear cargo door. The 9,000 pound craft will be able to carry up to 3,000 pounds of freight. Its noise, according to Kenneth Van Cleave, Tacoma surveyor and planner who is assisting the Dominion people, is comparable to that of an automobile and much less than that of construction machinery. There will be an average of three flights a day during the working week with an occasional flight of weekends when and if the Maple Valley facility is completed. A peak production of 15 planes a month is expected to start by the summer of next year.

New breed of plane: If plans are approved, the plane shown above will one day become a familiar part of Maple Valley’s landscape and skyways. It’s the twin-engine Skytrader 800 that will be built—actually in large part only assembled—at the proposed facility in the vicinity of 244th S.E. and Highway 169. The 42-foot-long, 14-passenger, prop-driven, high-wing aircraft is noted for its short takeoff and landing capabilities. It is designed to take off after only 400 feet of roll and to land within 310 feet. With its two Lycombing 400-horsepower engines, the Skytrader has a maximum speed of 200 miles an hour and a range of 2,000 miles. The plane, with its boxcar-shaped body, features a rear cargo door. The 9,000 pound craft will be able to carry up to 3,000 pounds of freight. Its noise, according to Kenneth Van Cleave, Tacoma surveyor and planner who is assisting the Dominion people, is comparable to that of an automobile and much less than that of construction machinery. There will be an average of three flights a day during the working week with an occasional flight of weekends when and if the Maple Valley facility is completed. A peak production of 15 planes a month is expected to start by the summer of next year.

After all the pages, graphs, and charts in Dominion’s impact statement, probably the most important parts are near the end.

These are listed as five in number and the majority of them—not all—are looked upon as short-term in nature by drafters of the report. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, June 4, 1975

(This is the third in a series of articles on historical personages written by students in Mrs. Vicci Beck’s history class at Tahoma Junior High School.)

By Bruce Jensen

Edith Johnson Wright at Peacock Station on the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad, Hobart, 1911.

Edith Johnson Wright at Peacock Station on the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad, Hobart, 1911.

The following article is from an interview with Edith Wright who has lived in Hobart since 1909. The interview proved very fruitful, with Mrs. Wright being a veritable storehouse of facts about Hobart in the early 1900s. I had no trouble in obtaining the information from her and enjoyed the interview very much.

Edith Wright

Mrs. Wright’s father was one of the most colorful and influential figures in Hobart’s history, Oscar “Strawberry” Johnson. He was a leader by nature, and did much to improve the Hobart area.

In 1907 he bought the remaining 80 acres of the Clifford homestead and began raising strawberries. The first year, he planted two or three acres, but later he planted more. Penny Clifford peddled the berries in Taylor, Ravensdale, Black Diamond, and Issaquah. (more…)

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