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Archive for June, 2017

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 27, 1902

Luoma, born in Finland in 1870, was a laborer at the Lawson Mine. Date of the photograph at the Black Diamond cemetery is unknown.

Luoma, born in Finland in 1870, was a laborer at the Lawson Mine. Date of the photograph at Black Diamond cemetery unknown.

Erik Luoma, a laborer, about 30 years of age, was run over and fatally injured in the Columbia & Puget Sound railroad yards at Black Diamond at 10 o’clock last night.

The engine and train crew of passenger train No. 1 which had finished the passenger run was making up a special freight in the yards, when the accident occurred. The engine was backing with a string of cars when Luoma was seen sitting on the track a few yards ahead of the engine. He was apparently asleep and the engine struck him before it could be stopped. He died a short while afterwards as a result of the injuries.

The body is held at Black Diamond awaiting instructions from the coroner, who was notified this morning. Deputy Coroner Wiltsie went to the scene of the accident this afternoon.

Luoma was a Finlander, who lived with his wife and child at Osceola. He is supposed to have been drinking yesterday and not knowing what he was doing sat down on the track and went to sleep. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 26, 1913

franklin-fire-1913FRANKLIN, Thursday, June 26 — The hotel building belonging to the local coal mining company and twenty-one frame dwelling houses were destroyed by a fire that started here at 2:30 o’clock this morning. The loss to the hotel and contents is about $16,000. The extent of the loss to the other buildings has not been determined.

The origin of the fire has not been learned but it is thought to have started on the second floor of the hotel. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 24, 1920

Watchmen on alert, opens fire on gang

Sends two shots after fugitives—they turn and reply with three, but make escape in darkness

Three cracksmen about 12 o’clock last night blew the outer door of the safe in the general store kept by the Pacific Coast Coal Company at Black Diamond, engaged in a revolver battle with George Upton, aged watchman, who drove them away, and escaped without obtaining any loot. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 24, 1906

Chief Engineer James Anderson of the Pacific Coast Company has been instructed to prepare estimates of cost for double-tracking the line of the Columbia & Puget Sound between Seattle and Black River Junction. The work will be done immediately. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 24, 1923

Beautiful trip close at hand: Trip to Lake Sawyer delights

Lovely body of water, studded with islands, lies straight east of Kent and thirty-one miles from Seattle

Seattle motorists often look too far away from Seattle in picking out objectives for their weekly tours, but there are many very delightful places within sixty miles of Seattle that are well worth a visit. Such a one is the trip to Lake Sawyer made by a Times Tours party in an Oakland Six coupe driven by Harry D. Austin, sales manager of the Northwest Oakland Company. Lake Sawyer is just a few miles straight east from Kent and a charming spot. These pictures show something of the country at and near Lake Sawyer. 1—Part of Lake Sawyer, one of the prettiest little bodies of water in the Puget Sound country. 2—The car that made the trip. 3—One of the attractive stretches of the road through the big Lake Sawyer grove of evergreens. 4—Scene on Cedar River in the Maple Valley. As the map indicates the return may be made via Maple Valley and that route offers a variety that is pleasing.

Seattle motorists often look too far away from Seattle in picking out objectives for their weekly tours, but there are many very delightful places within sixty miles of Seattle that are well worth a visit. Such a one is the trip to Lake Sawyer made by a Times Tours party in an Oakland Six coupe driven by Harry D. Austin, sales manager of the Northwest Oakland Company. Lake Sawyer is just a few miles straight east from Kent and a charming spot. These pictures show something of the country at and near Lake Sawyer. 1—Part of Lake Sawyer, one of the prettiest little bodies of water in the Puget Sound country. 2—The car that made the trip. 3—One of the attractive stretches of the road through the big Lake Sawyer grove of evergreens. 4—Scene on Cedar River in the Maple Valley. As the map indicates the return may be made via Maple Valley and that route offers a variety that is pleasing.

Too many motorists, when planning their weekend or Sunday trips, consider only those run-ups that take one many miles away from Seattle. They have their eyes focused, so to speak, on the distant points and miss altogether the wholly delightful places close to home. Like the children in Maeterlinck’s play who sought the blue bird all over the world and returned, finally, to find it had been in their own home all the time.

One of the chief charms of this Puget Sound country, however, and one of the things that makes owning an automobile so enjoyable, is the fact that there are dozens and dozens of delightful trips within a range of forty miles out of Seattle. It is not necessary for motorists to range far afield, to drive miles and miles before reaching interesting and pretty country, as is true In the East and South.

Trip to Lake Sawyer

For instance, there is the trip taken by The Times Tours party in an Oakland Six coupe last week, the trip to Lake Sawyer. Harry D. Austin, sales manager of the Northwest Oakland Company, proposed the trip. Austin reasoned that it seemed rather foolish to ignore the scenic attractions close to home and he promised that the trip would prove a pleasant surprise, so down Rainier Valley the Oakland started. (more…)

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Other days

Originally published in the Maplevalley Messenger, June 23, 1921

Our first pioneers and homesteaders settled on land along small streams or rivers, and so it was with the first settlers of Vine Maplevalley. The reasons for this are obvious. Their next thoughts were probably turned to selecting a suitable location for the buildings.

In some cases the houses were but temporary affairs—later developing into permanent and substantial homes. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, June 22, 1977

Jackie Strain with Maple Valley historical quilt.

Jackie Strain with Maple Valley historical quilt.

Jackie Strain of Maple Valley was announced this week as winner of the handmade quilt raffled by the Maple Valley Arts Committee recently and called the “Where You Live” quilt.

The quilt depicts historical scenes and settings of this area. (more…)

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