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Archive for October, 2017

Originally published in the Globe News, October 31, 1973

By our county news bureau

A proposed Black Diamond-Lake Sawyer interceptor would start at the west city limits, extend north past the western shores of Lake Sawyer, turn west of 272 St. SE and extend to Timberlane at the Covington Pump Station where it would join the existing Cascade Sewer System force main extending into Kent. The city of Black Diamond, the Lake Sawyer, Lake Wilderness and Pipe Lake areas would be required to provide local sewerage collection before connecting to the main interceptor.

A proposed Black Diamond-Lake Sawyer interceptor would start at the west city limits, extend north past the western shores of Lake Sawyer, turn west of 272 St. SE and extend to Timberlane at the Covington Pump Station where it would join the existing Cascade Sewer System force main extending into Kent. The City of Black Diamond, the Lake Sawyer, Lake Wilderness and Pipe Lake areas would be required to provide local sewerage collection before connecting to the main interceptor.

A sewerage system planned but dropped three or four years ago is once more underway, county officials announced this week.

The area to be served by the projected $1 million system is east of Auburn at Black Diamond, Lake Morton, and Lake Sawyer, where pollution problems have been increasing due to inadequate septic tank drain fields and growing population pressures. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS’s The Bugle, October 1993

By Barbara Nilson

Gathered on the front porch of the former Olson mansion on September 20 are Roosevelt (Ted) Olson and his wife, Cleo, at far right. In the back row are Ted’s nephews Jim Oien, Issaquah, and Keith Oien, Enumclaw, sons of Adeline Olson Oien; at back right is Vincent Olson, of Bothell, son of Ted. In front of Vincent is Ted’s daughter, Maureen Olson Engbert, of Seattle. In the front row are three nieces and a daughter; Jarine Olson Freeman, Seattle, Ivor’s daughter; Shirley Olson Patterson, Carnation, Olaf’s daughter; Shari Olson Lawrence, Woodinville, Ted’s daughter, and Virginia Oien Phelan, Seattle, Olga’s daughter. —Photo by Barbara Nilson

Gathered on the front porch of the former Olson mansion on September 20 are Roosevelt (Ted) Olson and his wife, Cleo, at far right. In the back row are Ted’s nephews Jim Oien, Issaquah, and Keith Oien, Enumclaw, sons of Adeline Olson Oien; at back right is Vincent Olson, of Bothell, son of Ted. In front of Vincent is Ted’s daughter, Maureen Olson Engbert, of Seattle. In the front row are three nieces and a daughter; Jarine Olson Freeman, Seattle, Ivor’s daughter; Shirley Olson Patterson, Carnation, Olaf’s daughter; Shari Olson Lawrence, Woodinville, Ted’s daughter, and Virginia Oien Phelan, Seattle, Olga’s daughter. —Photo by Barbara Nilson

Sunday dinners and holidays were some of the special times at the Olson mansion on 216th, recalled Roosevelt (Ted) Olson and some of his nephews and nieces as they gathered at the mansion on September 20th for the historical society’s monthly program.

Eight Olson children, five boys and three girls, grew up in the home built about 1905. Roosevelt, known as Teddy, is the only son still living. Two daughters, Mrs. Adeline Oien of Kent, and Mrs. Anne Thompson, Seattle, are also still living. (more…)

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Originally published in the News-Journal, Record-Chronicle, and Globe-News, October 28, 1973

Black Diamond experience. Staff photographer Eric Bass captures the mood of creation in an area workshop. All that are needed is a pair of sensitive hands, the right tools, and the urge to create. It isn’t recommended, however, that a creator in clay work on a bench covered with wood chips.

Black Diamond experience. Staff photographer Eric Bass captures the mood of creation in an area workshop. All that are needed is a pair of sensitive hands, the right tools, and the urge to create. It isn’t recommended, however, that a creator in clay work on a bench covered with wood chips.

The emerging art colony in Black Diamond has been simmering for some time.

About five years ago it began to bubble with the arrival of Ben Bieri, a potter from Kirkland. He came to the Puget Sound area from Kansas in 1953 and soon became known for his fine pottery. He has been a guest artist at the Annual Renton Art Show and has been accepted at Edmonds and Bellevue’s Pacific Northwest Arts & Crafts festivals.

His pottery has been displayed at the Creative Arts League, Kirkland. Through Nov. 12 his work will be exhibited in a group showing in the Cellar Gallery, Kirkland.

A landmark, Koerner’s Drug & Confectionery Store, has had a checkered past. It is being remodeled to house an art gallery by the Les Griffins who moved to Black Diamond from Auburn. (more…)

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Originally published in the Maplevalley Messenger, October 27, 1921

Burglars, believed to be operating with an automobile or light truck, broke into Gibbon’s store late Friday night or early Saturday morning and stole about $500 worth of merchandise of all description.

Tobacco, in the amount of $300, was the major portion of their loot. Other articles stolen include two sacks of sugar, all the hams and bacon, six pairs of shoes, socks, shirts, inner tubes, etc. Entrance was effected through a warehouse window. Deputy sheriffs are investigating. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, October 26, 1922

By Joe Osier

Fight fans employed in the operating mines of the Pacific Coast Coal Company and the “bugs” in the Seattle office of the concern on last Saturday night, October 21, were guests at a punching party staged at Black Diamond by the Black Diamond Athletic Club.

And, because there were plenty of punches to go around with enough left over for a 45-round World’s Championship go, everyone present enjoyed the fracas to the fullest with the possible exceptions of the a-the-letes who “win” the short end the pokes. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, October 26, 1895

Coroner and mine inspector examined witnesses from 8 o’clock in the morning until 3 o’clock the following morning—company exonerated

Coroner Askam returned yesterday from Franklin, where he went, in reply to a request from General Counsel Piles to hold an inquest on the death of the four men who lost their lives in the fire along the main slope on the 17th. The jury returned a verdict finding that the men “voluntarily went in the mine without orders” to their death. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, October 25, 1978

By Diane Wilson

He-e-e-re’s Johnnie, but Parkin, not Carson!

Johnnie Parkin is the new driver for the Metro Mini-Bus which serves Black Diamond, Enumclaw, and Maple Valley, providing transportation to Kent, Renton, and Southcenter. (more…)

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Proposed land plan — The new guidelines of the Maple Valley Area Council envision three land-use planning zones, indicated by the large numbers on the above map.<br /> Zone 1, west of Highway 169, is recommended for new single family lots on one acre, with exceptions down to one-half acre.<br /> Zone 2, between Highway 169 and the northeast bluffs of the Cedar River (shaded areas), remains open for determination as to new lot sizes.<br /> Zone 3, north and east of the Cedar River bluffs, is recommended for new single family lots of from three to five acres.<br /> Dotted lines are the boundaries of the Tahoma School District. (Map and topographical information below courtesy of Corff and Shapiro, Seattle.)

Proposed land plan — The new guidelines of the Maple Valley Area Council envision three land-use planning zones, indicated by the large numbers on the above map.
Zone 1, west of Highway 169, is recommended for new single family lots on one acre, with exceptions down to one-half acre.
Zone 2, between Highway 169 and the northeast bluffs of the Cedar River (shaded areas), remains open for determination as to new lot sizes.
Zone 3, north and east of the Cedar River bluffs, is recommended for new single family lots of from three to five acres.
Dotted lines are the boundaries of the Tahoma School District. (Map and topographical information below courtesy of Corff and Shapiro, Seattle.)

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, October 25, 1977

Two hearings for preliminary plats and planned unit developments will be heard before the Zoning and Subdivision Examiner for the King County Council on Thursday, Nov. 16 in Room 402 of the King County Courthouse. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, October 25, 1923

Every afternoon, rain or shine, the men who report at the slope to catch the man trip down at 3:30 are always ready to comply with the photographer’s request to stand for a picture. It is with genuine pleasure that the Bulletin herewith presents a sextet of real fellows, a part of the crew which daily does a shift in Black Diamond.

From left to right they are: C.W. Bland, J. Pohorence, L. Raschka, S.E. Bennett, C.P. Capaci (otherwise known as The Sheik), and T. Strigen. (more…)

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Originally published in The Issaquah Press, October 24, 1990

Victor and Gustava Sandell, at left, brought their young family to Issaquah in 1888, and built one of the first large family homes in the city in 1889. Their daughter Alma and her husband Evan Watkins, right, lived in the house for many years. That home at the corner of Alder and First Avenue NW was a city landmark for a century. It was torn down last year to make way for a new apartment building. Photos courtesy of Walt Watkins.

Victor and Gustava Sandell, at left, brought their young family to Issaquah in 1888, and built one of the first large family homes in the city in 1889. Their daughter Alma and her husband Evan Watkins, right, lived in the house for many years. That home at the corner of Alder and First Avenue NW was a city landmark for a century. It was torn down last year to make way for a new apartment building. Photos courtesy of Walt Watkins.

Victor and Gustava Sandell were both born in Finland. They arrived in Issaquah in 1888 from Michigan with daughter Ethel and son Frank. Another son and daughter, Samuel and Alma, were born within a few years of their arrival here. (more…)

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