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Archive for November, 2017

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, November 29, 1978

Building, center left, is part of the remains of the New Black Diamond Mine. It is now part of the King County Maintenance Shops.

Building, center left, is part of the remains of the New Black Diamond Mine. It is now part of the King County Maintenance Shops.

Holidays seem to bring visitors, and visitors to our area frequently have questions. There are often questions about coal and its history here.

There are many “old-timers” who can share their experiences but they are not always available when “Cousin Harry” asks, “Where were the coal mines?” or “How much coal did they get?”

The pictures on this page will help tell the story of one of the mines in the area. The New Black Diamond Mine was located between Maple Valley and Renton on what is now Highway 169. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, November 29, 1923

These men are not singing the old nursery rhyme of “Rub-a-dub-dub, three men in a tub,” even though the picture does call to mind the childhood jingle. They are eight full-sized he-men with safety lamps, full lunch buckets, and skilled hands, aboard a man trip ready to start down the slope to the lower levels of Black Diamond Mine for an eight-hour shift.

Among those in the car recognized by the Bulletin photographer were: Frank Eddy, George Hoadley, Joe Marquis, Serge Head, and Robt. Ogden. (more…)

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This is a story told by Henry Walters of some of the events of his life.

He was born in England and his Father, Richard Walters, was a railroad contractor. They lived in various parts of England, moving as often as the railroad construction jobs required.

At the age of 11 he went to work as a blacksmith’s helper. He worked for three years and saved enough money to emigrate to Hamilton, Ontario, Canada in 1882. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, November 26, 1885

The system of King County—Its cost, mileage, present and future traffic, etc.

The railroad system in King County is one of considerable magnitude now, and of rising importance. It is the largest enterprise in the county, and is doing more to increase and sustain the population than any other. Aside from the value of real estate held by the corporations, they have railroad properties in the county aggregating about $2,000,000. These properties consist of the tracks, wharves, depots, bunkers, shops, rolling stock, etc. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, November 24, 1963

By Matt Miletich

Bill Peacock, a colorful Hobart-Maple Valley old-timer, paused in his house-wrecking chores to tell how much he loves his life and work.

Bill Peacock, a colorful Hobart-Maple Valley old-timer, paused in his house-wrecking chores to tell how much he loves his life and work. (Times photo by Roy Scully.)

They must have thrown away the mold after they made Bill Peacock, one of Hobart’s oldest old-timers.

At 78, Peacock is a happy and hustlin’ eager beaver. “I consider myself a 78-year-old kid,” Peacock says.

Peacock, who began “adult” life at 13 butchering cattle, has been keeping busy recently wrecking an old house at 204 Minor Av. N. Wielding a sledge hammer, peavey, and crowbar, he gives all he’s got to tearing apart the old timbers.

Peacock acquired the house from a friend. Peacock is salvaging the lumber and materials and having them hauled to his seven-acre farm at Hobart, where he plans to erect some buildings.

Bill has batched on the acreage since the death in February of his wife, Rose. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, November 23, 1894

Engineers at work and narrow gauge to be widened very soon

A party of engineers under A.A. Booth is in the field revising the line for the extension of the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad to a connection with the Northern Pacific near Palmer, which is known as the Palmer Cut-Off, and it is understood that, while no official information on the subject can be obtained, the construction of the road will soon begin and be very soon followed by the widening of the Columbia & Puget Sound to standard gauge.

It is understood that this step has been hastened by the traffic connection between the Northern Pacific and the Burlington, the latter road wishing to save mileage and time in running trains to and from Seattle, its chosen Pacific Coast terminus, by avoiding the roundabout trap by way of Meeker. (more…)

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By Morda C. Slauson, 1958

Thanksgiving of 1862 was celebrated royally in a log cabin on the Duwamish River. Jacob Maple, his sons and daughters and two young men, Henry Van Asselt and Luther W. Collins, sat at a rough board table and gave thanks for the safe completion of a long, dangerous journey and the reuniting of a family.

Jacob and his son, Samuel, who had first arrived on Puget Sound in 1851, had just returned from a trip to the middle west, bringing the rest of the family to become the first permanent settlers of the Duwamish valley.

Faded land deeds, relating to the Maple property, now owned by Boeing Airplane Company, are among the souvenirs of Seattle’s early years which are cherished by Mrs. Edith Cavanaugh, 16020 196th Ave., Maple Valley. Her late husband, Fred Cavanaugh, was born in 1871 in the family home on the present site of Boeing Field, son of Mary Ann Maple and Martin L. Cavanaugh. (more…)

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