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Archive for December, 2017

Originally published in the BDHS newsletter, Summer 2016

By William Kombol

Kuzaro home, November 18, 1939

Kuzaro home, November 18, 1939

There are a number of resources available to learn about the history of your home or lot. One of the best resources is the Puget Sound Regional Archives (PSRA), located on the campus of Bellevue College near Eastgate.

PSRA’s collection includes property record cards kept between 1937 and 1972. This is the best source of historic photographs for homes and commercial buildings. These old photos were taken by the King County Assessor with the tax parcel, date of the photo, and other notations written on the photo, from which excellent quality prints can be made. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, December 27, 1923

Herewith the Bulletin publishes the first picture made public of the new Primrose tunnel at Newcastle, which only recently was completed to a distance of 650 feet where the new coal seam was reached.

Three shifts of gangway and counter driving will now be kept continuously on the development, and according to estimates, the new opening will be producing coal in commercial quantities by the early part of next fall.

In the foreground of the picture can be seen John G. Schoning of the United States Bureau of Mines; E.L. Fortney, fireboss; Paul Gallagher, former superintendent at Newcastle; and D.C. Botting, manager of mines. (more…)

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Originally published in the Maplevalley Messenger, December 27, 1923

The new logging camp at Lake Peterson has been making fast progress in their logging executions

The new logging camp at Lake Peterson has been making rapid strides lately in putting into execution their logging operations.

Mr. Wilson, who is managing the new camp, purchased a number of ties from Mr. Green, of the Hideaway Cash Store, and has extended Sandstrom Spur five hundred feet, giving loading accommodations for 60,000 feet a day.

They have two large donkeys, one at the woods and the other at the spur. They are laying the foundation for the loading stand.

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, December 26, 1900

A Christmas Day event

Reports of tests received at city hall by telephone—Two weeks more will elapse before water is turned into the reservoirs—Assistant City Engineer Scott makes good his predictions

The Landsburg dam is used to divert drinking water from the Cedar River to the pipeline serving the City of Seattle. The original dam was constructed in 1900 and updated in 1935, as shown here. (From Black Diamond NOW.)

The Landsburg dam is used to divert drinking water from the Cedar River to the pipeline serving the City of Seattle. The original dam was constructed in 1900 and updated in 1935, as shown here. (From Black Diamond NOW.)

Cedar River water flowed into the city limits of Seattle Monday night at 10 o’clock through the mains of the new gravity system. Unknown to the general public the water from the river was let into the main pipe line filling it almost to its greatest capacity and was then allowed to flow into the main trunk sewer at Twelfth Avenue South and Lane Street, by which it found its way into Elliott Bay.

Twelve days ago Assistant City Engineer Scott , who has charge of the work on the pipe line and at the intake on the river decided if possible to carry out the prediction he made six months ago that water from Cedar River would flow into the city limits on Christmas day, 1900. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Sunday Times, December 25, 1955

By Lucile McDonald

Promoters once saw Renton as the future site of great industrial development. This illustration was in advertising literature about 1910. The artist conceived a line of piers along the lake front and vessels entering the Cedar River. Steamers and sailing vessels were shown on Lake Washington. – Courtesy Renton Chamber of Commerce.

Promoters once saw Renton as the future site of great industrial development. This illustration was in advertising literature about 1910. The artist conceived a line of piers along the lake front and vessels entering the Cedar River. Steamers and sailing vessels were shown on Lake Washington. –Courtesy Renton Chamber of Commerce.

The man who has lived in Renton longer than any other person—John E. Hayes, 13612 S.E. 128th St—well remembers the day in December, 1897, when the first standard-gauge train reached the town. He ought to; he was firing the engine.

The Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad had bought the narrow-gauge coal line of the Seattle & Walla Walla Railroad and extended it in 1882 to Black Diamond and Franklin. It left Seattle on a right-of-way shared with the Northern Pacific, a third rail being laid to accommodate the narrow-gauge cars bound for Renton. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, December 25, 1900

Two men are killed, one by a fall of earth in the coal mine, the other by a train

Deputy Coroner Powers left yesterday afternoon for Black Diamond on receipt of information that two men had been killed at the mining camp yesterday morning. Inquests upon both cases will be held today at Black Diamond. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, December 22, 1922

Carrying coal to Newcastle is a performance which has long been banned by a proverb, but carrying firearms from Newcastle is a thing which incurs the displeasure of the Seattle Police Department.

It also tends to disrupt the best laid plans of mice and men, especially men who are about to become married men, as Robert Allen Swaney—of Newcastle—learned to his embarrassment yesterday. (more…)

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