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Archive for January, 2018

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 31, 1924

At the ocean terminal of The Pacific Coast Company’s railroad in California there are two large shipping wharves about two miles distant from each other. One agent, J.S. Sullivan, handles both wharves and he has worked out the ingenious machine shown above for running back and forth between them.

As can be seen, it is a five-passenger Ford car equipped with railroad wheels. The steering wheel, apparently, is intended for emergency calls when Mr. Sullivan is in too great a hurry to go around by way of the railroad track and finds it necessary to short-cut across the water. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, January 30, 1983

By Eric Pryne
Times staff reporter

Coal drew hundreds of immigrants to Black Diamond in the early 1900s—three young Italians, victims of a 1910 mine explosion, are buried in the town cemetery. The mining industry might make a comeback in the area after decades of dormancy. (Barry Wong/Seattle Times)

Coal drew hundreds of immigrants to Black Diamond in the early 1900s—three young Italians, victims of a 1910 mine explosion, are buried in the town cemetery. The mining industry might make a comeback in the area after decades of dormancy. (Barry Wong/Seattle Times)

BLACK DIAMOND — Their addresses may be the same, but they really are two communities—one old, one new—in and around this historic Southeast King County town.

The coal industry built Black Diamond a century ago. It was a bustling mining town with colonies of Welshmen, Italians, Slavs, and Finns—and a population three times larger than today.

But oil replaced coal in most of America’s furnaces, and Black Diamond already had begun fading by the 1930s. Today its best known export is bread from the bakery. The hills around town produce only a pittance of coal.

Even so, the mineral’s imprint on Black Diamond is everywhere. A mountain of slag and a coal car by the highway mark the entrance to town.

A stone in the cemetery tells, in Italian, of three men who died in a 1910 mine explosion. Many of Black Diamond’s homes are old coal-company houses, built before World War I.

And, among Black Diamond’s 1,200 residents, a good number of miners still fondly remember the old days. (more…)

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Originally published in the South County Journal, January 27, 2001

Contract to restore Seattle landmark could go to Seidelhuber Iron and Brass

By Dean A. Radford
Journal Reporter

Terry Seaman, vice-president of Seidelhuber Iron and Brass Works and a Hobart resident, checks out pieces of the fallen cast iron pergola in Pioneer Square. Seaman, who with his wife, Heidi Seidelhuber, will help with the reconstruction, has taken hundreds of photos to help with the reconstruction. (Patrick Hagerty/Journal)

Terry Seaman, vice-president of Seidelhuber Iron and Brass Works and a Hobart resident, checks out pieces of the fallen cast iron pergola in Pioneer Square. Seaman, who with his wife, Heidi Seidelhuber, will help with the reconstruction, has taken hundreds of photos to help with the reconstruction. (Patrick Hagerty/Journal)

SEATTLE – One of Seattle’s most-hallowed landmarks, the pergola in Pioneer Square, was shored up and its unusable parts tossed in a dumpster yesterday in preparation for the pergola’s eventual restoration.

Terry Seaman of Hobart, a longtime citizen activist in the Maple Valley area, and his wife, Heidi Seidelhuber, supervised the work.

The family’s business, Seidelhuber Iron and Brass Works, has a $250,000 contract to remove the pergola, strip the lead paint and eventually move it to the company’s south Seattle plant. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, January 27, 1885

P.B. Jones, superintendent of the Black Diamond coal mines, came in to town yesterday, to attend to the shipping of sixty tons of machinery to be used in the operation of the mine.

The slope has been sunk on the vein to the depth of 360 feet, and will be extended 40 feet lower before the gangway is opened. The bunkers are partially in frame, the hotel is being roofed over, and work is being generally pushed ahead.

Sixteen carpenters and large number of laborers are constantly employed about the mines. No coal will be shipped from Black Diamond before the middle of April, after which regular shipments are expected to be made.

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 24, 1924

During Christmas week the striking window display pictured above was exhibited by the Porter Transfer & Fuel Co., of Snohomish, Washington, dealers in that city for the Pacific Coast Coal Company.

Mr. J.R. Porter is authority for the statement that the truck is loaded with two tons of Black Diamond lump. Needless to say, he has developed a thriving fuel business in Snohomish. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS’s The Bugle, November 1996

Dear Bugle and Maple Valley Historical Society:
I might be able to give a little more history of Maple Valley and Hobart. Hobart was where the Sidebothams finally homesteaded or staked their claim to live.

I am not sure who came into the area first, Sidebothams or Peacocks—a few generations passed before it got to me. I would be the last to carry the Sidebotham name until my sons came along. I married Erma Lissman, graduate of Renton High School and a native of Roundup, Montana. We have four grown kids. I moved from Hobart fourteen miles to Kennydale.

Pacific Coast Railroad No. 12 leads eastbound freight at Hobart, ca. 1942.

Pacific Coast Railroad No. 12 leads eastbound freight at Hobart, ca. 1942.

Hobart and Maple Valley were just four miles apart, then (going east) came the town of Taylor. The town of Kerriston was the last little settlement or community in the timber.

Hobart thrived on logging. Wood & Iverson had a sawmill, a company store, and a bunkhouse that housed (board and room) about 100 loggers. There were three rows of company houses for loggers and families to live in. Many people had a little stump ranch with a few livestock, worked at the mill or logging camp, and went to Alaska for the fishing season for salmon. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, January 19, 1913

Dramatic trial scene at Hobart where coroner’s jury inquires into killing of Albert Gault by his son

Parent quarrelsome whenever he drank

HOBART, Saturday, Jan. 18 – Although a coroner’s jury today found that Albert Gault, a farmer of this place, met death last Thursday as a result of a gunshot wound inflicted by his son Ollie, strong evidence was presented by the widow and mother to the effect that the action of the young man was not without great provocation. (more…)

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