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Archive for February, 2018

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, February 28, 1979

(The following article is the first in a series on people and organizations in Maple Valley written by students in the Beginning Journalism class at Tahoma High School. Diana Kalanquin, sophomore, interviewed Grange members and read Morda Slauson’s 100 Years on the Cedar for information on this Cedar Grange feature story.)

The Cedar Grange, 216th and Highway 169, is more than an empty hall but an institution dedicated to the well-being and prosperity of the community.

The Cedar Grange, 216th and Highway 169, is more than an empty hall but an institution dedicated to the well-being and prosperity of the community.

By Diana Kalanquin

Cedar Grange is more than an empty hall to the Valley. It is an institution interested in the well-being and prosperity of the community.

The Grange is the oldest farm organization in the country. Organized in 1867 it is non-partisan and does not contribute to any political party, support particular candidates, and is not owned by or obligated to any political figure, party, or administration. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, February 28, 1900

Victim of Black Diamond explosion horribly burned—death was instantaneous

Details of the finding of the body of T.A. Davis, the miner who has been entombed in one of the Black Diamond coal mines since last Wednesday morning, were brought to Seattle yesterday by Thomas A. Parish, a local mining man. He was at Black Diamond Monday afternoon when the body of Davis was discovered and taken out. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, February 24, 1900

Black Diamond miners have failed to find their dead companion’s remains

P.B. Cornwall

P.B. Cornwall

The Black Diamond coal miners are working to find the body of their comrade, T.A. Davis, who was buried in the mine at the time of the explosion Wednesday morning. They are digging night and day to reach the pocket where his body is supposed to be, but up to last night had failed to reach it.

During the search for the dead miner’s body all work on Mine No. 14, in which the explosion occurred, has been suspended, and the workmen in shifts are digging through the barrier of rock and coal to the head of the breast where Davis is believed to be entombed. They will keep at their labors night and day until they find the remains. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, February 24, 1914

Miner rescued after 7 days underground

By Roy A. M’Millan

Mike Bobcanik, rescued miner, and his family. They are, back row, left to right—Mike junior and Pauline; front row, left to right—Joe, Mike Bobcanik, the father holding little Tom; Mrs. Bobcanik and Annie. John is on his mother’s left.

Mike Bobcanik, rescued miner, and his family. They are, back row, left to right—Mike junior and Pauline; front row, left to right—Joe, Mike Bobcanik, the father holding little Tom; Mrs. Bobcanik and Annie. John is on his mother’s left.

FRANKLIN, Tuesday Feb. 24.—Seven nights and six hours were spent in a living tomb by Mike Bobcanik, a Franklin coal miner, who was rescued alive from the Cannon Mine at Franklin at 1:30 o’clock yesterday afternoon.

In a space ten feet long, four feet wide, and a foot and a half high, the prisoner stoically awaited his fate. He was without food during the time of his imprisonment but managed to obtain water. Today, this 137-pound bundle of nerves lies on a bed in his home at Franklin, under orders of a physician, and chafes at his continued enforced idleness. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, February 21, 1924

Every afternoon when the men gather at the lamp room to don their safety lamps before taking the man trip for a shift down on the 9th, 11th, or 12th levels of Black Diamond, a similar group to the one shown above may be seen. These men are well trained at their jobs and thus keep the production high and the costs low, which is the goal desired by every successful mine.

In the group above may be seen: Fireboss Ben Davis, Andrew Sorenson, Chas. Schaffer, Harry Heton, Horace Watkins, Russell Wade, and Art Walton. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, February 20, 1927

Three towns will be served by splendid structure in Union District on Cedar River

The photograph shows the new $65,000 structure in which a Taylor-Hobart-Maplevalley union high school will open tomorrow, and Earl D. Bonham, superintendent of the district.

The photograph shows the new $65,000 structure in which a Taylor-Hobart-Maplevalley union high school will open tomorrow, and Earl D. Bonham, superintendent of the district.

Like a youngster who appears wearing his first long trousers, the Seattle community shows its rapid growth by definite new things. Just as such a boy surprises you some morning, so do pleasant surprises like the new Union High School at Maplevalley, hit the observer with not unpleasant frequency.

The Tahoma High School opens tomorrow in a $65,000 building a mile east of Maplevalley, and twenty-nine miles from downtown Seattle.

All that region, which is tapped by the Cedar River, along which is a paved road almost to the town of Maplevalley, is on the rise. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, February 19, 1913

William Barnum, president, Pacific Coast Co.

William Barnum
president, Pacific Coast Co.

William Barnum, newly-elected president of the Pacific Coast Company, arrived here yesterday afternoon from New York City on his first official visit to the vast properties owned by this corporation in the states of Washington, Oregon, and California.

Mr. Barnum, who is one of the most eminent lawyers of New York City, as well as long prominent in its highest financial circles, was in Seattle but once before yesterday—that was seventeen years ago when he acted as counsel for the reorganization committee of the Oregon Improvement Company, the predecessor of the Pacific Coast Company. (more…)

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