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Archive for March, 2018

Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier Herald, March 31, 1988

Frank Zumek and Brad Darby display a smokehouse full of ready-to-eat Easter hams.

Frank Zumek and Brad Darby display a smokehouse full of ready-to-eat Easter hams.

Easter is traditionally ham time. Grocers and local meat markets are preparing for the increase in sales, while shoppers are weighing the price differences and deciding which type of ham they’ll bake.

Ham, a form of pork, comes with and without a bone. Customers make their choice based on convenience, cost and taste, local meat merchants say. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, March 31, 1908

Fifteen minutes before a train loaded with 200 passengers would have been on it, the Columbia and Puget Sound Railroad bridge across the Cedar River beyond Maple Valley, fell under the burden of a coal train and plunged six cars of coal instead of the cars of human beings into the river.

Had the coal train succeeded in getting across, there is no doubt that the passenger train would have plunged into the river, still swollen by recent floods and no one knows how many lives would have been lost. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, March 30, 1988

By Dawn Yoshitake

Tucked behind a barn, Black Diamond Police Officer Tom Chase watches for speeding vehicles (Betty Udesen/Seattle Times).

Tucked behind a barn, Black Diamond Police Officer Tom Chase watches for speeding vehicles (Betty Udesen/Seattle Times).

Parked next to an old garage on Roberts Drive, shrouded by darkness and rain, police officer Tom Chase waits.

Within 10 minutes, his radar detector begins to whine, its pitch rising with the red digital numbers that flash the accelerating speed of an approaching red van.

The driver’s speed reaches 38 mph but drops abruptly after he spots the black patrol car. Chase, with reflexes a tad slow this time, clocks him at 35 mph—10 miles over the speed limit. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, March 29, 1972

The King County Council has directed the Environmental Development Commission and the Department of Planning to study the eastern portion of the county to enable the establishment of an updated zoning code.

This area has been divided up and Black Diamond and Maple Valley have been lumped together for study and presentation. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, March 28, 1979

If you enjoy Mexican food, the place to go on Tuesdays is the Black Diamond Sandwich Shop, reported the Voice of the Valley on January 12, 1976. Mr. & Mrs. George Wilson and their children, Erin and Eric, are the new owners of “The Black Diamond.”

If you enjoy Mexican food, the place to go on Tuesdays is the Black Diamond Sandwich Shop, reported the Voice of the Valley on January 12, 1976. Mr. & Mrs. George Wilson and their children, Erin and Eric, are the new owners of “The Black Diamond.”

Editor, the Voice, and friends:
There must be a song that says, “It’s hard to say goodbye.” If not, there should be.

Somewhere around April 1 or shortly thereafter, we will probably be closing the doors at “The Black Diamond,” the only cafe-drive-in in the city. We realize that many of you have seen businesses come and go, but it has been our first attempt at being in business ourselves and our first “going out of business.” (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, March 27, 1924

Burnett may be a long way from Glasgow, but you’d never know it when the Scotch of the camp start out to celebrate the birthday of the immortal bard, “Bobby Burns.” The picture reproduced above shows a quintet that helped make the welkin ring at the last celebration.

From left to right they are: Mrs. Thos. Taylor, Mrs. Fred Hobson, James Blair, Mrs. James Blair, and Mrs. Robt. Wallace. Two others, Mrs. H.A. Doddrell and Mrs. John Burt, also participated in the program but were unable to be in the picture. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, October 11, 2016

By Bill Kombol

With the Major League Baseball [season] ready to begin, it’s fun to look back over 100 years to a women’s baseball team which played for Ravensdale.

Though baseball and soccer were big sports for coal miners representing their respective mining towns, the ladies also took up bat and glove. According to Barbara Nilson’s Ravensdale Reflections, baseball games were played every Sunday at a rough field on the Landsburg Road just across from the Markus store, now known as the Ravensdale Market. (more…)

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