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Archive for March 7th, 2018

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, March 7, 1979

(This is the second in a series of feature articles written by students in Tahoma’s Beginning Journalism class. Steve Eichelberger, a senior, lives in Hobart where he became acquainted with Dorothy Iverson. She remembers when her small community housed the largest lumber mill in the Northwest.)

By Steve Eichelberger

Dorothy Iverson and her son, Warren, at their Hobart store. Dorothy remembers Hobart in the days of its lumber mill and the Hobart Bunk-Hotel.

Dorothy Iverson and her son, Warren, at their Hobart store. Dorothy remembers Hobart in the days of its lumber mill and the Hobart Bunk-Hotel.

For many years, Dorothy Iverson was a homemaker.

“Women didn’t work in those days,” she said about her early life in Hobart. Mrs. Iverson was born in Seattle where she lived with her three older brothers and three younger sisters before moving to Hobart while in the seventh grade.

She remains there today where she still helps operate the Hobart store.

Mrs. Iverson attended school in what is now the Hobart Grange and graduated from Tahoma, where she had been editor of the high school newspaper and class valedictorian.

She attended Wilson Business College in Seattle and after graduation was a secretary in Seattle for four years.

She married the late Iver Iverson in 1933 and they set up housekeeping in Hobart. Iver was employed at his father’s grocery store, the “Wood and Iverson Grocery Store,” where he continued to work until it burned in 1939. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, March 7, 1914

Road from Enumclaw to Black Diamond to be less than 5 percent at highest point

The high bridge across Green River Gorge, a famed scenic site located between Enumclaw and Black Diamond, was built in 1915, according to Swan Swanson, whose father drove the first car across it.

The new Enumclaw-Black Diamond highway, officially known as bond issue No. 9, will be on a maximum grade of a fraction less than 5 percent at its highest elevation, according to the location map filed with the Board of County Commissioners yesterday by Chief Deputy County Engineer C.P. Dexter. The grade on the old road is 20 percent.

This enormous drop in the in the uphill pull is one of the biggest improvements that the county will make under the road bond issue. The maximum grade of 4.9 prevails only on one-quarter of a mile between Enumclaw and Franklin. From Franklin to Black Diamond the new grade is 4.4 percent. The new highway is 7.2 miles in length and will cost $5,000 a mile. At Franklin the county will build a $30,000 steel bridge.

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