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Archive for April, 2018

Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, April 25, 1963

A meeting was held on April 15, at the Eagles Hall, for the purpose of furthering the plans for a Black Diamond community hall. Plans were made to reactivate the Black Diamond Civic Club, which is still registered as an incorporated organization. The proposed building would be available for all town activities. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 24, 1924

Recently officials of the Pacific Coast Coal Company and representatives of Yakima Valley fruit growers conducted tests to determine the effectiveness of preventing damage to blossoming trees by the installation of Diamond Briquet burners in the orchards. The result was most satisfactory.

At the right in the above cut is shown an orchard scene with a briquet burner in the foreground. To the lower left is a truck load of Diamond Briquets being delivered in the orchard. The man in the driver’s seat is T.M. Reeder of the Sales Department. In the oval, from left to right, is N.D. Moore, vice-president Pacific Coast Coal Co.; Arthur Karr, Yakima Valley orchardist and inventor of the briquet burner; A.F. Marion, chief engineer Pacific Coast Coal Co.; T.M. Reeder of the Sales Department, and Bruce Dower of the John Dower Lumber Co., Yakima dealer for the Pacific Coast Coal Co. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, April 24, 1906

Buckley second baseman accused of spiking three baserunners

BLACK DIAMOND, April 24—The ball game between Buckley and Black Diamond had a very unsatisfactory ending. In the last half of the eighth inning, with the score standing 8 to 7, in favor of the Black Diamonds, the Buckley second baseman was accused of purposely spiking three of the Black Diamond players. (more…)

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Originally published in the Maplevalley Messenger, April 22, 1924

R.W. Frame

R.W. Frame

Over 7,500 merchants from the Northwest and Western states are expected to attend the annual Pacific Northwest Exposition to be held at the Bell Street terminal, Seattle, August 4 to 9. Over 400 booths are expected to be reserved by Northwest manufacturers and distributors.

Arrangements are now being made by Paul V. Knudson, executive secretary, for a much larger show than the 1923 event, when over 4,000 merchants registered from the Hawaiian islands Alaska, Montana, Utah, Arizona, New Mexico, Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, April 22, 1919

Taken in whiskey raids. This photograph shows the largest and smallest stills seized by Sheriff John Stringer and his deputies since their war upon manufacturers of liquor in King County began. The larger still, with boiler, condenser, and goose neck, is four feet high and officers say is capable of producing from twelve to fifteen gallons of liquor a day. It, together with kegs and a washboiler of mash and two quarts of Grappa, was found in a sunken concrete room on the farm of Carl Arimeni, one mile from Newcastle. A galvanized water bucket, sauce pan with wire stand, and a tin basin made up the smaller still. It was seized at the home of H.H. Hammond, 722 Main St.

Taken in whiskey raids. This photograph shows the largest and smallest stills seized by Sheriff John Stringer and his deputies since their war upon manufacturers of liquor in King County began. The larger still, with boiler, condenser, and goose neck, is four feet high and officers say is capable of producing from twelve to fifteen gallons of liquor a day. It, together with kegs and a washboiler of mash and two quarts of Grappa, was found in a sunken concrete room on the farm of Carl Arimeni, one mile from Newcastle. A galvanized water bucket, sauce pan with wire stand, and a tin basin made up the smaller still. It was seized at the home of H.H. Hammond, 722 Main St.

After a search lasting three days, in which more than one-tenth of an acre of woodland was dug over with crowbars, picks and spades, deputy sheriffs yesterday afternoon found the largest still yet seized in King County, on the farm of Carl Arimeni, proprietor of a pool hall in that mining town.

Arimeni was arrested and is being held in the county jail, while Sheriff John Stringer, together with government officers, are making today a further investigation. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, April 20, 1988

By Eulalia Tollefson

A successful community celebration takes months of advance planning, as past Black Diamond Labor Day committees will confirm.

Following their zealous predecessors’ example, Labor Day committee members already are busy developing strategies for another great celebration, this year on Saturday, Sunday, and Monday, Sept. 3 through 5. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, April 18, 1979

By Teresa Hensley

Circled above is the low area in the right abutment of the masonry dam.

Circled above is the low area in the right abutment of the masonry dam.

“There is no imminent danger, and people should not be alarmed,” said Colonel John A. Poteat, the Army Corps Seattle District Engineer, in a press release last week from Seattle City Light about the masonry dam above the Cedar River.

In an earlier press conference it was revealed that the dam could prove unsafe in the event of a major flood.

Conditions which could trigger such an emergency—described as “a flood on top of a flood” by Joe Recchi, acting superintendent of City Light—have never been approached in the 75 years of the project. (more…)

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