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Archive for June, 2018

Originally published in The Seattle Times, June 29, 1969

Before the Pacific States Lumber Co. closed its mill in 1939, Selleck was a neat little town with a school, meeting hall, water system, and post office.

The mill superintendent lived in house number 1, the company doctor and supervisors lived in the 300 row, and mill hands lived in the 200 and 500 rows. (more…)

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Respect for the flag is one of the first marks of patriotism. The man who can talk the loudest about the duties of citizenship often forgets to uncover when the flag goes marching by, or sits with a bored expression on his face when the national anthem is played. It is not for the flag itself, but rather for what it stands, that every true American owes due homage and respect to its starry folds.

Salute the flag! Stand at attention to the strains of The Star Spangled Banner! For thus is patriotism fostered in the youth of our land and respect for law and order maintained. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, June 28, 1989

Fourteen sites in Pierce County and two sites in King County have been selected as locations for Washington centennial historical markers.

Puget Sound Power and Light will donate the markers to be placed in about 85 communities throughout its nine-county service area.

The 10-inch-square markers will replicate the official centennial dome shape and will be cast in solid brass by Anacortes Brass Works. They will be presented during ceremonies to be held during the summer months. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, June 26, 1966

The mountain of coal outside the Rogers No. 3 shaft of the Palmer Coking Coal Co. operation near Black Diamond shows the extent of coal-mining activity that is still being carried on in King County.

The mountain of coal outside the Rogers No. 3 shaft of the Palmer Coking Coal Co. operation near Black Diamond shows the extent of coal-mining activity that is still being carried on in King County.

At one time, coal mining was a big operation in the Puget Sound area. Before the turn of the century, the black gold was being dug from foothill sites such as Carbonado and Black Diamond, Newcastle and Franklin, Renton and Ravensdale, Coal Creek and Issaquah. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, June 22, 1977

By Michael Prager
Times South Bureau

Swimmers jumped into the Green River Gorge. — Staff photos by Vic Condiotty

Swimmers jumped into the Green River Gorge. — Staff photos by Vic Condiotty

BLACK DIAMOND — Not far from the Black Diamond home of Jules Dal Santo, the Green River plunges down a magnificent gorge.

A mantelpiece to what Dal Santo and other locals call “God’s country,” the Green River Gorge is at once beautiful, rugged, and treacherous.

Each year, hundreds of people visit the gorge. They come for many reasons—fishing, canoeing, swimming, or just plain sightseeing.

But each year, the fun and beauty of the gorge are marred. Death and injury, too, are frequent visitors. Dal Santo should know.

It’s Dal Santo’s job as Black Diamond’s assistant fire chief to help rescue those whose fun turns against them.

“Broken legs, arms, necks, drownings, you name it,” the 61-year-old Dal Santo said, recalling 31 years of experience in search-and-rescue efforts on the river. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, June 22, 1988

From Johnson’s Corner up river. First position boat, Oh My Back V; second, Foss’ Grocery; third, M.V. Tile; fourth, Frank’s Meat II.

From Johnson’s Corner up river. First position boat, Oh My Back V; second, Foss’ Grocery; third, M.V. Tile; fourth, Frank’s Meat II.

Records tumbled like swift water through the “boulder yard” on the Cedar River June 11 as the seventh annual running of the Dinghy Derby Boat Race provided plenty of excitement for the throngs of race fans who turned out this beautiful Saturday afternoon.

The race, which is limited to dinghies under 12 feet with a paddler in front and a rower behind, was this year dedicated to “Big” Mike Williams.

Veteran starter Jim Holder, along with long-time officials Larry Johnson and Harry Honnold sent ten dinghy and eight rafts down the 4.6 mile course (from the Maple Valley Bridge to the Lions Club Park) at 30 second intervals. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 20, 1924

When the man-trip starts down the slope at Newcastle Mine the men who are going on shift are always ready and waiting. This group was caught by the photographer just before they went on shift. In the front row can be seen H.G. Hagenbush, B.E. Van Alstine, A.C. Marsh, Frank Oriet, Walter Trover, Joe Daler, Otto Sproat, Victor Nelson, Robt. Joughin, and Geo. Brandon. In the back are A.L. Richards, Wm. Eddy, V.J. Ryan, Frank Hollands, and H.S. Syverson. (more…)

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