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Archive for July, 2018

Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, July 31, 2002

By Desiree Lerum
For the Courier-Herald

From his computer terminal at the food bank, Enumclaw’s Roy Dalsanto keeps track of donations and recipients. (Photo by Brenda Sexton.)

From his computer terminal at the food bank, Enumclaw’s Roy Dalsanto keeps track of donations and recipients. (Photo by Brenda Sexton.)

Roy Dalsanto remembers as a young child going to the local church to pick up the bags of flour and sugar his family received on a welfare-type program. His father had been injured while working in the Black Diamond coal mines and the family was short on money.

Because of that, Dalsanto can identify with the people who use the services of the Enumclaw Food Bank that he runs. He enjoys giving people the help they need through the food bank.

“My family needed help and I like to help others,” he said. (more…)

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Originally published in the Renton News Record, July 31, 1952

Negotiations have been opened by the City of Renton to acquire a 15-acre swimming beach site near the Shuffleton plant from the Great Northern Railway, the News Record learned this week.

The Lake Washington property was formerly owned by the Pacific Coast Railroad but is now controlled by the Great Northern. City Attorney Arthur Haugan has contacted the railroad on a price for the property and is awaiting a reply. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, July 30, 1953

Mary Ellen Robbins

Mary Ellen Robbins

Of interest to many of the people in this area will be the news of little Mary Ellen Robbins, 7-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A.L. Robbins, who for 22 years lived in Black Diamond but are now residing in Seattle.

Little Mary Ellen is rapidly becoming one of the sparkling little Majorettes in her own right. In the contest held at the Rain Festival at South Bend, June 20th, she walked off with the large gold trophy as winner in the novice division (up to 7 years of age).

Sunday, July 5th at the State Baton Contest held at Tillicum, Washington, May Ellen won the second place in the Advanced Novice division with many complimentary remarks on her Official NBTA Score sheet showing she had very good rhythm, smoothness, was a good showman, and showed great promise as a twirler.

Mary Ellen is also a talented dancer and performer doing her tap and twirl performances for many programs and entertainments.

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, July 29, 1987

Horseshoe pitching is more than just a picnic folly for the Heines

Elwood and Ken are teammates on the Green River Tavern team.

Elwood and Ken are teammates on the Green River Tavern team.

Meet Elwood and Kenneth Heine, the “shoes brothers.”

The Heines pitch horseshoes with passion and precision. They’ve flung the weighty good-luck pieces with South King County’s best for more than a decade. In the horseshoe pits, the Heines make their own luck.

For Elwood and Ken, horseshoe pitching is more than a picnic folly. It’s an art, a rhythmic exercise with a rustic beat—the thud of the shoe in the sand, its clink against the metal stake. Nearly every other horseshoe they loft snuggles perfectly around its target.

Close does count in horseshoes—a point is awarded if the shoe is within six inches of the stake—but for the Heines, only a “ringer” will do. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, July 29, 1913

Joe Klansnik, of Black Diamond, and four-year-old child, receive serious injuries when car turns over

BLACK DIAMOND, Wash., Tuesday, July 29. – Three persons are in the hospital of the Pacific Coast Coal Company at Black Diamond and two may die as the result of injuries sustained in an automobile accident Sunday afternoon on the road between here and Auburn. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, July 28, 1907

(1) Steam shovel making cut at junction of new road with Columbia & Puget Sound line at Maple Valley. (2) Another view of same. This stream will be bridged by a 200-foot steel span. (3) Another view of tunnel, showing northwest end. (4) Piledriver constructing temporary trestle-work in Cedar River bed, two miles from Maple Valley. (5) A cut from which 16,000 cubic yards of earth have been removed. (6) Southeast end of the tunnel, six miles from Maple Valley.

(1) Steam shovel making cut at junction of new road with Columbia & Puget Sound line at Maple Valley. (2) Another view of same. This stream will be bridged by a 200-foot steel span. (3) Another view of tunnel, showing northwest end. (4) Pile driver constructing temporary trestle-work in Cedar River bed, two miles from Maple Valley. (5) A cut from which 16,000 cubic yards of earth have been removed. (6) Southeast end of the tunnel, six miles from Maple Valley.

When one of the greatest common carriers of the country announced its determination to extend its line to the Pacific Coast, with Seattle as its terminal, excitement waxed for the customary nine days and then waned. During that time the land through which it was foreordained the road must pass advanced enormously in value, changed hands countless times, and finally became stably established in price on the market.

The advent of the great road was more or less a matter of futurity, the public was too busily occupied with the immediate present to concern itself with the future and the activities of the road were forgotten. But while the public has neglected to take cognizance of its operations, they have nevertheless been productive of results.

Armies of workmen are scattered along its roadbed for hundreds of miles, its construction work has now been extended to practically the outskirts of the city and it be only a matter of a few months before the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul again commands the attention of the public by sending its first train over the completed road to Seattle.

At Maple Valley, twenty-two miles from Seattle, the construction work has been going on rapidly. The railroad’s efforts are centered on the seven miles intervening between the intake of the Cedar River water system and Maple Valley. Beyond the intake the operations are confined almost entirely to clearing the right of way to North Bend, where the road is also engaged in construction work on a large scale. (more…)

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Originally published in the Eastside Journal, July 27, 1999

By Tim Larson
Journal reporter

A Newcastle coal train, fatally sidetracked 125 years ago, will spend at least one more winter at the bottom of Lake Washington.

An effort to rescue one of the historic coal cars, led last year by Newcastle Councilman John Dulcich and Councilwoman Pam Lee, is now on the back burner.

“Really, it’s on hold right now,” Dulcich said. “We still plan to do it, but we have other priorities right now.” (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Daily Times, July 26, 1920

Will compete for state honors in rescue and first aid work

About 350 heroes, worthy of a Tennyson but now only everyday heroes, will assemble at Roslyn Saturday, August 14, to compete for state honors in mine rescue and first aid contests. British Columbia also has been invited to send teams, and the 15 first aid ten mine rescue teams from mines throughout Washington may be augmented. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, July 25, 1924

Though it may have been considered futile and useless to talk of shipping coal to Newcastle—we mean the Newcastle of Merrie England—it is an accomplished fact that the Pacific Coast Coal Company ships coal to Vancouver, British Columbia.

Evidence of this is seen in the two scows here shown loading at the Pacific Coast Coal Company bunkers. Each scow takes approximately 475 tons of Newcastle buckwheat coal, which is then towed to Vancouver for delivery to the British Columbia Sugar Refinery.

Approximately sixteen hours is required to tow the loaded scows to their destination. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, July 24, 1906

BLACK DIAMOND, Tuesday, July 24 – The Excelsiors of Seattle wandered into camp Sunday and gave Black Diamond the hardest fight any team has offered on these grounds.

The first game with a score of 1 to 0 in favor of the Black Diamond team was played in one hour and thirty minutes, the second game with a score of 3 to 2, also in favor of the Black Diamonds, was hard fought. Bartlett, a man with a spit ball, pitched both games for the Excelsiors. Hoye for Black Diamond only allowed two hits during the first game. (more…)

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