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Archive for November, 2018

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, November 28, 1924

Though this is Black Diamond’s first soccer team, the boys are attracting considerable attention in the Washington State Football Association this season. Next Sunday they meet the Newcastle eleven on the latter’s field in the elimination playoff for the state cup. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, September 29, 2015

By Bill Kombol

This photo of the 1926–27 Black Diamond soccer team comes courtesy of Jerry and Lynda English.

This photo of the 1926–27 Black Diamond soccer team comes courtesy of Jerry and Lynda English.

The Black Diamond Miners, as they were called, were in the first division of Northwest Soccer League playing teams such as Todd Shipbuilders and others sponsored by local companies and communities. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Star, November 24, 1928

Crack teams battle at Woodland Park; Vikings go to Black Diamond Sunday

By Barney Kempton

The big soccer battle of the season in Seattle will be fought out Sunday at Upper Woodland Park when the Carbonado Coal Diggers clash with the Electro-Dentists in their second game of the year.

The kickoff is set for 2 p.m.

The Dentists are out for revenge as they lost a tight game to the Carbonado outfit at Carbonado last month. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, November 21, 1924

Thanksgiving Day is distinctly American. If those who established this institution had not been truly grateful to Divine Providence for the meager store of provisions wrung from a barren shore and hostile land, would we today who dwell in abundance have cause to render homage to the Pilgrim’s God?

It is for us, then, not to raise our voices in paeans of praise for the lavish blessings in which we revel today, but rather, to be humbly grateful for the heritage of Thanksgiving. Thus the nation today can sing its grateful praise to Him who guided the footsteps of that freedom-loving band who bequeathed to us America! (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, November 14, 1924

Deep down in the canyon of the Carbon River, and some distance down the stream from the mine tunnel entrances, is situated the bunkers and tipple of Carbonado Mine. The topography of the place fortunately permits the use of gravity to a very large extent in the handling of the coal. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, November 12, 1986

By Eulalia Tollefson

Dan Palmer, shown with his dog, Puppu, singing ‘Black Diamond Mines.’

Dan Palmer, shown with his dog, Puppu, singing ‘Black Diamond Mines.’

Dan Palmer’s distinctive style of easy listenin’ folk music and a catchy, nostalgic song called “Black Diamond Mines” have earned exposure on radio KEZX—exposure Palmer hopes will draw the interest of music scouts.

Palmer and his trademark—a devoted 15-year-old pooch named Puppu—are familiar to area folk who frequent local restaurants, taverns, and night spots.

Everywhere from Boots Tavern, the Black Diamond Saloon, and the Amber Inn to the Pick and Shovel in Wilkeson, Palmer draws crowds with a variety of folk music.

From old time blues to bluegrass he entertains with old favorites and originals like “Black Diamond Mines,” a song he wrote in honor of Black Diamond’s 100th birthday celebration.

The ballad was born of Palmer’s fascination for the town’s coal mining history. Much of it is a tribute to Dooda Vernarelli, a colorful town character much loved by old and young alike. (more…)

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By By JoAnne Matsumura and Cary Collins

One hundred years ago—at 11 a.m., November 11, 1918—World War I came to a close. There were cheers and tears, singing and dancing, hugging and kissing. Spirits ran high. The men and boys would soon be coming home to their families, wives, and sweethearts. The planning began.

From small towns to the big cities, Americans welcomed and greeted their heroes with bands playing. The doughboys arrived by boat, train, bus, and some lucky enough to catch a ride with their fellows heading in the same direction. There were parades, community gatherings, speeches of appreciation, and presentations of honor. Who could forget the long awaited taste of mom’s apple pie? (more…)

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