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Archive for January, 2019

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 29, 1925

Few coal camps in the country can boast of a wash house comparable with the splendid structure erected for that purpose in Carbonado. Of brick and hollow tile construction, with full cement floors, the building is modern throughout and equipped with every device for the comfort and convenience of the men.

Adding to its attractiveness is a neat lawn with ornamental flower beds in front of the building. A portion of the wing to the left is devoted to canteen purposes, providing pool tables and a stock of confectionery and tobacco for the men of the camp. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, January 25, 1978

By R. Dianne Wilson

Part of the IGA crew at Black Diamond’s Hi-Lo Market. From left, Daryl Taylor, Frank Zumek, Charlie Ash, Lois Zumek, Jeff Plant, and Joe Zumek. Voice photos by Bob Gerbing.

Part of the IGA crew at Black Diamond’s Hi-Lo Market. From left, Daryl Taylor, Frank Zumek, Charlie Ash, Lois Zumek, Jeff Plant, and Joe Zumek. Voice photos by Bob Gerbing.

A recent poll disclosed that the words “market” and “shopping” mean a variety of things to many people. Obviously a market is a place where they go to buy food and other items available. Often, however, it is more than that.

Sometimes people make a “trip to the store” because they are tired of staying indoors because of bad weather, and some may go because they are lonely and want to see a smiling face and have someone to talk to (as most checkers will agree).

In gathering material for this article, we walked slowly through the Black Diamond store with open eyes, as opposed to many rush-hour trips, and noted the many things now available, including fishing and sporting gear, home repair items, and small kitchen appliances. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, March 18, 2014

By Bill Kombol

The United Mine Workers of America (UMWA) were first organized on January 25, 1890. At one time this union was the most powerful in America.

From 1920 through 1960 the UMWA coal miners were led by John L. Lewis, a persuasive labor leader who founded, the Congress of Industrial Organizations, better known as the second half of the acronym AFL-CIO. Coal mine union membership peaked in 1946 at 500,000 but has since dipped to under to under 75,000, only 20,000 of whom are active coal miners. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, January 24, 1915

Pacific Coast Company now using South Prairie products in plant

Diamond BriquetsFollowing the successful introduction of Black Diamond coal briquets, the Pacific Coast Coal Company has just placed upon the market a new briquet, made from the coal of the South Prairie mines. Both kinds of briquets are the product of the company’s $225,000 briquetting plant, completed just a few months ago at Briquetville, on the south shore of Lake Washington.

The coal is ground fine, washed, heated, and mixed with liquid asphalt; then stamped into briquets under a pressure of more than two tons to the square inch. In briquet form the fine furnace coal is adapted much better to household use.

Each Black Diamond briquet is marked with a diamond, and each of the new South Prairie briquets with an “N,” as a distinguishing mark.

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 22, 1925

One of the greatest assets which any community can possess is a fine school. In this particular Newcastle ranks with the best and every citizen of the camp is proud of the fact. There is the very finest co-operation between the teaching staff and the Parent-Teacher Association which serves to keep both pupils and parents interested in the school’s welfare and advancement.

The view shown herewith was taken some time ago, when the youngsters were enjoying the sunshine of the noon hour. Prof. M.M. Richardson is the principal of the school, teaching the 7th and 8th grades. Mrs. Richardson teaches the 5th and 6th grades, Miss the 3rd and 4th, and Mrs. R.R. Sterling the primary grades. There are approximately 110 pupils enrolled. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Star, January 20, 1912

One of the Denny-Renton plants at Renton.

One of the Denny-Renton plants at Renton.

No review of Seattle’s industrial enterprises and activities would be complete without an adequate mention of the Denny-Renton Clay & Coal Company, one of the largest enterprises of its kind in the world. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 15, 1925

One of the first structures in Carbonado to catch the eye of the visitor is that of the company store. Of brick construction, it houses the general merchandise store and meat market, while in the rear is situated the mine office. Manager C.T. Paulson and his staff are always ready to see that the wants of every customer are promptly satisfied. (more…)

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