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Archive for February, 2019

Originally published in the Seattle Daily Times, February 27, 1927

Extension by Puget Sound Company will be ready for service tomorrow

Extension of the service of the Puget Sound Power and Light Company to the town of Maple Valley from Renton, effective tomorrow, was announced today by M.T. Crawford, superintendent of distribution. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, February 27, 1974

By D’Ann Pedee

It’s a family affair—but not the Bob, Carol, Ted, and Alice type.

“A Family Affair” is a leather goods and handcraft shop in the heart of Morganville—the small suburb of Black Diamond reached by turning right at the Black Diamond coal car.

Once you’ve found it, you’ll be glad you used the gas if you’re at all interested in handmade leather items.

Helen Reid, her son, Jack, and two daughters all have a hand in creating and custom designing belts, wallets, handbags, hair ornaments—anything that can be made of leather. They have accepted personalized projects ranging from police belts to dog and cat collars and will soon be able to do tack items such as harnesses. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, February 26, 1925

Because of ill health Prof. M.M. Richardson, recently principal of the Newcastle Grade School, has resigned and is now taking a much needed rest. Succeeding him as principal is Mrs. R.R. Sterling, who for several years has taught the primary grades of the school.

Miss Winifred Butler, first at the left, teaches the third and fourth grades. Standing next to her is Mrs. Sterling, then Prof. Richardson and Mrs. Richardson, the latter being in charge of the fifth and sixth grades. The seventh and eighth grades are now being taught by Miss Grantham who will complete the retiring principal’s term. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, February 25, 1923

Medical, military, and industrial units show efficiency in operation

Thrilling rescues and efficient first aid work were demonstrated at The Armory last night, with the Washington National Guard and the King County Medical Society as hosts. 1—Boy Scouts show how to make a stretcher. Left to right, Glen Peterson, Troop 40; Carrol Philips, Troop 41; William Bliss, Troop 40 (on stretcher); Earl Deaner, Troop 40. 2—Maj. George W. Becler examining a trophy. 3—CoIumbus Hospital team, left to right. Miss E. Cassinat. Dr. William C. Speidel, Miss E. Hoover, Mrs. H.H. Ross, Miss K. Bates, Miss P. Campbell. 4—Lieut. Col. Harry Vanderbilt Wurdemann, chief umpire. 5—Lieut. Joseph Salvage, Seattle Fire Department, thinks life-saving is entertaining. The victim is Fireman T. Harden.

Thrilling rescues and efficient first aid work were demonstrated at The Armory last night, with the Washington National Guard and the King County Medical Society as hosts. 1—Boy Scouts show how to make a stretcher. Left to right, Glen Peterson, Troop 40; Carrol Philips, Troop 41; William Bliss, Troop 40 (on stretcher); Earl Deaner, Troop 40. 2—Maj. George W. Beeler examining a trophy. 3—Columbus Hospital team, left to right. Miss E. Cassinat. Dr. William C. Speidel, Miss E. Hoover, Mrs. H.H. Ross, Miss K. Bates, Miss P. Campbell. 4—Lieut. Col. Harry Vanderbilt Wurdemann, chief umpire. 5—Lieut. Joseph Salvage, Seattle Fire Department, thinks life-saving is entertaining. The victim is Fireman T. Harden.

Helmets, miners’ lamps, campaign hats, and nurses’ caps bobbed about in the Armory last night when an interesting exhibit of rescue work and first aid was staged by teams representing medical, military, and industrial organizations. The affair was arranged jointly by the King County Medical Society and the Washington National Guard. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Daily Times, February 24, 1929

Men who have made the new plant possible: 1—Wylie Hemphill, vice president and sales manager, and W.H. Green, plant manager. 2—Executives of cement company and affiliated companies. Left are, Carl English; purchasing agent; S.E. Hutton; research engineer; Thomas Reeder, assistant sales manager, Pacific Coast Coal Company; Walter Barnum, president Pacific Coast Company; E.F. De Grandpre, manager company hotels and real estate; E.C. Ward, vice president; Mr. Green; N.D. Moore, vice president; Ray Smith. engineer; H.M. Watkins, secretary and treasurer; A.F. Marion, manager steamship and engineering companies; W.A. Wilson, superintendent of mines; Darwin Meisnest, assistant sales manager cement company, and Mr. Hemphill. 3—Mr. Hemphill, Mr. Meisnest, and Ray Larson, Anchorage, Alaska, with latter signing order for first shipment to Alaska.

Men who have made the new plant possible: 1—Wylie Hemphill, vice president and sales manager, and W.H. Green, plant manager. 2—Executives of cement company and affiliated companies. Left are, Carl English, purchasing agent; S.E. Hutton, research engineer; Thomas Reeder, assistant sales manager, Pacific Coast Coal Company; Walter Barnum, president Pacific Coast Company; E.F. De Grandpre, manager company hotels and real estate; E.C. Ward, vice president; Mr. Green; N.D. Moore, vice president; Ray Smith. engineer; H.M. Watkins, secretary and treasurer; A.F. Marion, manager steamship and engineering companies; W.A. Wilson, superintendent of mines; Darwin Meisnest, assistant sales manager cement company, and Mr. Hemphill. 3—Mr. Hemphill, Mr. Meisnest, and Ray Larson, Anchorage, Alaska, with latter signing order for first shipment to Alaska.

First carload is sent on its way in record time

Gratifying accomplishment is recorded in ten months; Seattle leaders watch first shipment go

Rivaling the exploits of Aladdin’s genie, is the accomplishment of the officials of the Pacific Coast Cement Company, whose big, million-barrel capacity Portland cement plant made its first shipment of Diamond Cement last Friday, just ten months from the date that construction of the plant started on the twenty-acre site which it occupies on East Marginal Way. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, February 23, 1900

Entombed in a deadly pocket

T.A. Davis, one of the oldest coal miners on the coast, caught in the rush of burning fluid and held to his death—comrades work to find his body—two workmen were badly injured

One man is entombed in a pocket of terrible coal gas and doubtless dead and two are seriously burned as a result of an explosion in one of the Black Diamond mines at 10 o’clock Wednesday morning.

The man believed to be dead is T.A. Davis, one of the oldest employees of the company.

The injured are Maurice Roccia and a miner named Kline. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, February 19, 1925

Tramways and aerial cables are common sights around metal mines, but it’s uncommon to find a coal mine with its entrance 450 feet below the level of the surrounding country. The above view shows the “incline” at Carbonado, a 35-degree pitch, down which all supplies and the daily shifts are lowered and raised.

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Carbonado victor in soccer battle

Battling the valiant Newcastle soccer eleven, the Carbonado squad last Sunday put up such a fight that the score ended 4 to 0, with the Carbon lads on the long end. Carbonado played a fast game.

Newcastle put up a fair defense, but with a number of new men, and also handicapped by a recent period of idleness, the Coal Creek team could make little headway against the strong Carbon defense. (more…)

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