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Archive for March, 2019

Originally published in The Seattle Times, March 30, 1988

Hang a sharp right at the Cooper Tire sign outside the Bremmeyer Logging Co. shop, breeze through a shady patch of Douglas firs, and there it squats on a distant back corner of King County’s park at Ravensdale: the Gracie Hansen Building.

She was quite a gal, this Gracie, whose bare-breasted “Girlie Revue” both wowed and outraged Seattleites at the 1962 World’s Fair.

In those days the building was known as the Paradise International Nightclub. It was the hottest thing in town.

Now it’s as desolate as an abandoned farmhouse. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier, March 27, 1930

Contract extending the paving of the Enumclaw-Black Diamond road for a distance of 1.14 miles has been let to Anderson and Liljebeck for the sum of $25,164.69.

Thomas D. Hunt, county engineer, has set the date for completion June 1, 1930.

Other south district projects to be awarded Monday, March 25, were Auburn-Black Diamond paving extension for a distance of 1.06 miles and the repaving of the Kent-Meredith Old Brick road for a distance of .86 miles, both to be completed June 1, 1930. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, March 26, 1925

Walter Burnum, recently elected president of The Pacific Coast Co.

Walter Burnum, recently elected president of The Pacific Coast Co.

As is generally known among the employees, the Pacific Coast Coal Company is owned and operated by The Pacific Coast Company, of which Mr. Wm. M. Barnum of New York has for many years been president, and Mr. Walter Barnum, treasurer. Mr. E.C. Ward is president of the former and vice-president of the latter. Mr. Walter Barnum has now been elected to the presidency of The Pacific Coast Company, and Mr. Wm. M. Barnum continues as a director of the company and in close association with its affairs.

Both of these Eastern officials have been in Seattle for the past week on their semi-annual visit of inspection, and they will probably remain here until the end of the month. They, with Mr. Ward and other local officials, are visiting each of the mine operations.

The new president is intimately familiar with all of the company’s activities, and enjoys a wide acquaintance among the employees, having been a regular visitor at the mines for many years past. On this, as well as former trips, he has extended his personal inspection into the underground workings of the mines, in the activities of which he takes a keen interest.

He is also closely identified with the larger coal problems of the nation, being vice-president of the National Coal Association which embraces in its membership most of the principal operators of the United States. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Star, March 19, 1908

Hold-up man attempts to rob Maple Valley saloon, but bartender resists—robber escapes and is arrested in Seattle

After having on Tuesday night engaged in a desperate hand-to-hand fight with the bartender of Pat Quinnan’s saloon at Maple Valley, while attempting to hold up the place, as a result of which he escaped minus his coat, mask, and hat, Ben Dixon, aged 26, was captured last evening in his room at the Alaska Commercial hotel in this city. The arrest was made by Deputy Sheriff Matt Starwich and his assistant, Matt O’Grady, of Ravensdale. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, March 19, 1925

Here is shown a shipment of asphalt on the pier ready for loading into Pacific Coast box cars for shipment to the Briquet Plant. Asphalt is used in the manufacture of Diamond Briquets to bind the finely pulverized South Prairie and Black Diamond coal together. It is shipped from California by water in barrels.

When ready for melting at the Briquet Plant the barrels are broken up and the staves burned, as there is no method by which the hardened asphalt can be removed without destroying the container. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, March 17, 1929

George Watkin Evans is asked to solve problems of anthracite diggings for Pennsylvania firm

George Watkin Evans, Seattle mining engineer, chosen to make survey of Pennsylvania anthracite fields.

George Watkin Evans, Seattle mining engineer, chosen to make survey of Pennsylvania anthracite fields.

Industrial wise men of the East have reached into Seattle to capitalize the wealth of experience acquired by a grimy Welsh lad since he began at the age of 11 oiling coal cars in mines at Franklin.

The lad, now the eminent George Watkin Evans, consulting coal mining engineer, who can boast a number of college degrees and recognized mining achievements, has been selected to make a detailed study of the underground operations of the numerous anthracite mines of Philadelphia and Reading Coal and Iron Company, the largest anthracite coal company in the world.

Is recognition of Northwest

He was selected by A.J. Maloney, new president of the reorganized company, to devise better ways of mining. The face that a Seattle man was chosen when ordinarily the anthracite fields of Pennsylvania have supplied such talent is regarded by coal mining experts as recognition of the Pacific Northwest and tribute to Mr. Evans. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, March 12, 1925

Peter Bertoldi is the agent for the Pacific Coast Coal Company at its Georgetown Depot. This view shows him in front of his office at 5422 Duwamish Avenue.

Black Diamond Doings

Camp to possess model ball park

Final touches have now been put on the Black Diamond baseball park, which will make it one of the finest diamonds outside of the league parks. Grass seed has recently been planted on the infield, and two new dugouts have been built, and in addition the whole field has been carefully gone over and put in A-1 shape for the season.

The recent sunshine has brought out the baseball aspirants, and judging from the early work-outs Black Diamond will have a wealth of material from which to build up a first class ball team this season.

New uniforms have been ordered, of a solid grey color, with the company trade mark on the left breast and an orange diamond with a black letter “B” on black caps. The socks are black and white. The uniforms are on display this week in the windows of Piper & Taft in Seattle. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, March 6, 1927

Auburn party visits New Black Diamond Mine

Learn fine points of underground work at new property of Pacific Coast Coal Company

By Ellis Coe

Scenes at the New Black Diamond mine of the Pacific Coast Coal Company visited last week by a Seattle Times-Auburn party. The car was supplied by Rowland & Clark, Auburn distributor here. 1—Mine motor and cars at entrance to the main tunnel. 2—Theodore Rouse, mine foreman, employed by Pacific Coast Coal Company for twenty-five years. 3—Partially completed warehouse, shops, power house, and office. 4—The Auburn on the highway leading to New Black Diamond. Andy Emerson is at the wheel. 5—Ben Jones (left) and his brother Tom, who discovered the coal deposits in 1919. 6—View along Cedar River. The Auburn in which the trip was made is in the foreground.

Scenes at the New Black Diamond mine of the Pacific Coast Coal Company visited last week by a Seattle Times-Auburn party. The car was supplied by Rowland & Clark, Auburn distributor here. 1—Mine motor and cars at entrance to the main tunnel. 2—Theodore Rouse, mine foreman, employed by Pacific Coast Coal Company for twenty-five years. 3—Partially completed warehouse, shops, power house, and office. 4—The Auburn on the highway leading to New Black Diamond. Andy Emerson is at the wheel. 5—Ben Jones (left) and his brother Tom, who discovered the coal deposits in 1919. 6—View along Cedar River. The Auburn in which the trip was made is in the foreground.

To a novice in the coal mining business, who has never been further underground than the depth of his neighbor’s cellar, a trip of more than one mile into the heart of a mountain of coal is somewhat of an experience. Further than that, when blasting operations begin while this same novice is underground, it heightens the interest in the experience. The question as to whether the stay in the heart of the mountain will be permanent immediately enters the mind of the quasi coal digger, with the odds in favor of permanency. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, March 5, 1925

Before sailing from Seattle for the United Kingdom and the Continent this week, the S.S. Oklahoma of the French Line, Compagnie Generale Transatlantique, managed on the Pacific Coast by the General Steamship Corporation, filled her bunkers for the long voyage with steam coal from the Pacific Coast Coal Company. This vessel is one of a fleet of fine steamers owned by the French Line, including the Mississippi, Georgia, and Arizona, all of which ply in the Puget Sound service. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, March/June 2007

Howard Botts

Howard Botts

Black Diamond is my favorite subject since I’ve lived there all my life. I think these two towns, Maple Valley and Black Diamond, have some things in common; a couple of them are Highway 169 and railroads.

People in Seattle heard that the Northern Pacific was coming to this area and going to Tacoma.

They felt if they couldn’t have that they were going to build their own railroad from Seattle to Walla Walla over the pass. So they started in 1873, got as far as Renton in 1876; then extended it to Newcastle. In 1880 Henry Villard, of the Northern Pacific, bought it from the Black Diamond Coal Company and renamed it the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad. (more…)

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