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Archive for June, 2019

Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, June 2007

Story and photos by Barbara Nilson

Paul Bartholomew and his daughter, Karen Lindquist, stand in front of the foundation for the press factory that made clay pipe.

The daffodils are blooming in Taylor as they do every spring to welcome back those who have fond memories of living there when it was a booming coal and clay company town. Taylor existed from 1892-1947, when the Seattle Public Utilities formed the Cedar River Watershed and closed the area to the public.

Each April the Utility District and Friends of the Cedar River Watershed offer the walking tour into Taylor for two weekends at a cost of $15. Participants gather at the Cedar River Watershed Visitors/Education Center for a slideshow of early day Taylor, then climb into vans for the 10-mile drive to the site.

The Education Center has interpretive exhibits that show where our water comes from and historical materials about the watershed area. It is an interesting place to browse anytime of the year. I especially like the musical artwork in the rain drum court where drops of water play tunes on the various drums. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, June 28, 2005

By Kathleen E. Kear

Miners at the Ravensdale Northwestern Improvement Co., Mine, circa 1912. The man seated on the ground is Leander Thibaut who perished with thirty other men in the November 15, 1915 Ravensdale Mine accident. Photo courtesy of Black Diamond Historical Society

Preparations for the 2nd Annual Black Diamond Miners Days are well underway for the weekend of Friday, July 8 through Sunday, July 10.

Hosting the event once again is the Black Diamond Merchant Partnership. The event began during the summer of 2004 as a way to encourage community members and guests to come and get to know the various businesses within the City of Black Diamond. The event also grew out of an appreciation of the miners and their families who helped establish Black Diamond. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 26, 1917

The Pacific States Lumber Company recently purchased approximately 400,000,000 feet of timber from the Northern Pacific Railway Company, situated in the vicinity of Cedar Lake, and will bid not only for the city timber but the timber on government property to be acquired for watershed purposes by the city.

All of the timber in the watershed, should the sale take place, will be logged under such sanitary regulations as may be promulgated by the health and sanitation department, and certain term of years will be allowed in which to remove all timber.

The coast of timber in the Cedar River watershed, as well as land, has been a charge against the water fund, and the revenues of the sale now proposed will be converted into that fund and used for extension purposes and betterments to the system.

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Originally published in the Seattle Daily Post-Intelligencer, June 26, 1884

The idea of subsidizing the Columbia & Puget Sound Company to enable it to complete its road up Cedar River was a good one, but not so good as another that has since been put forth. The new idea is to loan the company the needed money, and it was proposed by Mr. Howard, the company’s representative. The terms upon which the money is to be loaned will strike the reader as most fair, and will be found reported in full in the following. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 25, 1925

Practically the entire populations of Newcastle, Burnett, Carbonado, Black Diamond, and Wilkeson joined in celebrating the first annual picnic given by the employees of the Pacific Coast Coal Company and allied companies at Fortuna Park last Sunday.

Music was plentifully dispensed throughout the day by the combined Newcastle and Black Diamond bands, numbering 40 pieces in all. Wilkeson, as special guests from the Wilkeson Coal Coke Co., came in more than 50 automobiles, each decorated with a distinctive sign. The ambulance was utilized as a supply wagon. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 22, 1913

1913 Buick touring car

Last Sunday morning Phillip Smyly, sales manager of the Buick Automobile Company in Seattle, started out in the general direction of Green River Valley. The trip lasted two and a one-half days and resulted in Smyly’s landing orders for four Buicks. He covered close to 400 miles on his jaunt, which took him through Kent, Auburn, Black Diamond, and other towns in that vicinity.

In Black Diamond he met a prospective buyer who said his order depended on whether the car could take a capacity load over Brooks Hill, a long, steep grade near the town that is notorious for its immunity from attacks by motor vehicles.

Smyly acquiesced, and to make the bargain good he added a sixth passenger. The manner in which the powerful little Buick ascended the grade made the Black Diamond man gasp. He remarked that “no car had done it before,” and then drew forth his checkbook. The notations he made on the paper made him the owner of a new touring car and Salesman Smyly smiled sweetly.

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, June 19, 1910

R.P. Price, on Sunday exploring expedition, discovers new route to Renton, with good roads all the way

Passes one machine between two cities: Trip circles Lake Washington, by way of Newcastle and Coal Creek, where automobiles are novelty

A new scenic drive, a few miles from the heart of the city, has been discovered by R.P. Price. He says that for a short run it is the best he has yet seen. Few motorists seem to be aware of its existence. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 18, 1925

More than a mile from the entrance to the tunnel, the Bulletin photographer secured this picture in the Carbonado Mine when the Bruiser Seam was visited by a party of newspaper men last Monday. At the extreme left Supt S.H. Ash is seen telling Nettie Gilpatrick to watch the two miners, if she wants to learn how to dig coal. There being no gas in this tunnel, open flame lights are employed. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Times, June 16, 1982

By Cathy Reiner
Times South bureau

King County Police Capt. James O’Brien would like to move his Precinct 3 (Southeast King County) police operations to the soon-to-be-vacated Fire District 43 fire station in Maple Valley.

Fire District 43 Chief Dwight Van Zanen would like to sell the fire station.

If the county and fire district commissioners agree, the move could solve some thorny problems for both police and fire operations. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, June 13, 1989

Maple Valley Day’s Cedar River offers a mecca for summer fun as these youngsters have discovered. — VOICE photo by Teresa Hensley. This young Sonics fan had a prominent spot in the recent Maple Valley Day Parade.

The judges had a difficult task in trying to decide winners among the many excellent entries in the June 2 Maple Valley Day Parade. Their final category decisions are listed below.

DRILL TEAMS, Section 1: 1st, Renaissance “A” Team; 2nd, Drill-A-Rines; 3rd, Ballard Eagles Jr. Drill Team.

DRILL TEAMS, Section 2: 1st, Burien Eagles Drill Team; 2nd, Renaissance “B” Team.

JEEP UNITS: 1st, Green River Valley Jeepers; 2nd, Powerline Pounders. (more…)

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