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Archive for October, 2019

Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, October 31, 1884

Editor, Post-Intelligencer:

Your correspondent was yesterday placed under great obligations to Mr. J.L. Howard, general superintendent of the Oregon Improvement Company, by reason of an invitation, obtained through the kindness of Mayor Leary, to accompany himself, Mr. Leary and Mr. A.A. Denny over the new line of railroad stretching from our city toward the Green River coal fields, and known in common parlance as the Cedar River Extension. Mr. Denny was, to the regret of all, unable to attend.

The party was under the thoughtful care of Mr. T.J. Milner, the genial assistant superintendent of the Columbia and Puget Sound Railroad. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Star, October 30, 1906

While famine is threatened in this city coal mine owners are first supplying the wants of San Francisco and Alaska—output also being curtailed

Seattle is threatened by a coal famine. Already prices of coal have been raised so that today Seattle householders are paying from $1 to $2 more per ton than they were two months ago. The excuse given for this raise is that there is today a shortage of coal.

To old customers coal dealers are suggesting that if they would not suffer later in the winter orders for a full season’s supply should be given at once. The Star has endeavored to discover the cause of this shortage and probable famine. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, October 29, 1925

Gathered at the face of the rock tunnel in the New Black Diamond Mine, the men responsible for the excellent work of engineering and drilling which recently was completed there, are shown in the accompanying flashlight picture. The scene shows the men at the conclusion of drilling 28 holes in the barrier of 9½ feet of solid sandstone, which the blast broke down and connected the tunnel with the gangway which had been driven from the opposite side.

From left to right, they are; D.C. Botting, Bert Cook, Barney Doyle, F. Van Winkle, T.L. Jones (discoverer of the mine) , E.L. Fortney, foreman, L. Hayden, Jas. E. Ash, Chas. Gallagher, Ben Allen, foreman, R.W. Smith, Chas. Ryan, C. Busti. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, October 28, 1925

Smashing a stolen bandit car stalled on railway tracks near Kanaskat, a Northern Pacific train scattered loot for several hundred feet along the right of way last night. Joe Bertelli, grocer of Kangley, identified ham, hominy, and other articles as his property, taken from his store a few hours before.

Deputy Sheriff Tom Smith of Enumclaw, who investigated the burglary, reported the bandits’ automobile was a stolen car taken from Seattle nearly a month ago. Search is being made for the fugitive.

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, October 22, 1925

With representatives present from Renton and Seattle, together with mining men from over the state and the official family of the Pacific Coast Coal Company, the New Black Diamond Mine was formally opened last Friday, October 16.

N.D. Moore, vice-president, pulled the switch which set off the final blast breaking down the 9-foot barrier of solid rock separating the two tunnels on which work had progressed for more than a year. (more…)

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Originally published in the North Kittitas County Tribune, September 26, 2019

By Sue Litchfield

General Mine Manager John Kangley was a self-made man, an Irish orphan who made his way to the United States In the mid-1800s. At 45 years old, he was appointed general mine manager of the Northern Pacific Coal Company in Roslyn and served from 1888 to 1896. During that same time he also managed the Star Coal Company in Streator, Illinois, and owned the Kangley Mine near Ravensdale, Washington. Photo courtesy of Streator Times Press.

ROSLYN—This marks the fourth in the series of articles about early Roslyn history based on research at Northern Pacific archives in St. Paul, Minnesota. In the early years, Roslyn’s coal mining company was the Northern Pacific Coal Company (NPCC), owned and operated by the railroad. Following a major restructuring of the company in 1896, NPCC became the Northwestern Improvement Company (NWI), a subsidiary of the railroad.

John Kangley, who simultaneously served as general manager of two different coal companies, had two company towns named for him, owned coal mines in Western Washington, and invented one of the first ever coal mining machines.

Mob rule in Roslyn

The Dec. 30, 1888, telegram sent from Tacoma had a note of urgency to it.

“In taking the new drivers to Roslyn this afternoon [No. 3 Mine Superintendent] Ronald and Williamson were surrounded and knocked senseless by strikers…”

Roslyn had been a hotbed of contention since the Knights of Labor had gone on strike August 11, 1888. Ten days later, the Northern Pacific Railroad had brought in African American coal miners to finish development of their No. 3 Mine in Ronald.

Then on Christmas Day, 100 mule drivers went on strike, which effectively shut down their Roslyn operations, In response, Superintendent Ronald brought 10 African American mule drivers from Ronald to Roslyn, and all hell broke loose.

“…several new men badly used up,” continued the telegram addressed to Kangley, “and mob rule reigns in Roslyn tonight.” (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, October 15, 1925

Prize livestock and big pumpkins were not the only attractions at the recent State Fair held at Yakima, as the booth pictured herewith will attest. John Ryczek, resident agent for the Pacific Coast Coal Company in Yakima, writes the Bulletin that the Diamond Briquets and the peaches, both varieties, attracted wide attention.

Over the picture of the alluring young ladies at the left, the sign reads. “These Peaches will not freeze, they use Diamond Briquets,” while at the right above the plates of fruit is the inscription, “These Peaches did not freeze, they used Diamond Briquets.” (more…)

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