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Archive for November, 2019

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, November 26, 1925

Pause a moment today to give thanks. Though joyous and festive the day, it is not enough to merely BE thankful, but he who fully appreciates the significance of the event will from a devout heart GIVE thanks.

This expression should not be simply for the abundance of material goods which a bountiful Providence has vouchsafed us, but we should rather thank God for the heritage of a great nation and the opportunities of the present. Give thanks for the Fate which made it possible for you to live in America; give thanks for what the future holds. Then, with a thankful heart, live up to the highest ideals of the nation. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, November 22, 1925

Prosperous town on Naches Pass Highway surrounded by rich agricultural, timber, and mineral lands, is boasting of rapid development

New mill of the White River Lumber Company on the White River, three miles from Enumclaw.

One of the earliest settlements in that part of the state and the only place of that name in the United States, Enumclaw, forty miles southeast of Seattle, is one of the biggest little towns in the West.

Early history and distinctive name, however, are not Enumclaw’s only claims for attention. Thought its early growth was slow, Enumclaw today is counted one of the most prosperous towns in the Puget Sound region. Rich agricultural land, timber, and mineral surround it. It is on the Naches Pass highway, the most direct route between Seattle and the west entrance to Mount Rainier Nation Park. It is the gateway to unlimited scenic attractions, fishing, and hunting grounds. Backup up against the Cascade foothills, Enumclaw is within two hours’ drive of perpetual snow on one side and the waters of Puget Sound on the other. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, November 19, 1925

Shortly before the tunnel work was completed in the New Black Diamond Mine last month, Manager of Mines D.C. Botting arranged for the mine superintendents and supervisors from each of the camps to inspect the property.

In addition to going over the New Black Diamond property the party also visited the Briquet Plant, where the process of manufacturing Diamond Briquets was witnessed first hand. The picture shows the group on the trestle leading from the mine entrance to the tipple and bunkers under construction. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, November 16, 2005

Wally’s World

By Wally DuChateau

Pick and Shovel restaurant and bar in Wilkeson.

Thirty years ago, over drinks with some local friends, I predicted the imminent demise of small-town Enumclaw. There wasn’t anything especially insightful about this prophecy. In fact, most of my friends agreed with me.

At the time, I also suggested that anyone nostalgic for Enumclaw’s vanishing small-town ambiance should migrate to Wilkeson or Carbonado. In general that advice has also proved sound.

Until recently. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, November 13, 1996

By Casey Olson
The Courier-Herald

No video tape in the world could hold the rich history of the Black Diamond community.

There is just too much of it.

But give Bob Eaton and Micki Ryan a lot of credit. The pair is undertaking the mission impossible and attempting to put together the first-ever video history of the history-rich town.

They’ve found the task fascinating and time consuming.

The coal mining industry brought immigrants from all around the world to the tiny hamlet nestled in the Cascade foothills during the late 1800s and early 1900s, turning the quiet community into a bustling city. Italians, Greeks, Chinese, Germans, Hungarians, and Irish were blended together every day, a clash of cultures that helped form the modern day community of Black Diamond. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, November 12, 1925

During the summer months H.H. Boyd, manager of the Pacific Coast Coal Company’s agency in Wenatchee, prepared for a big season this winter. He had the storage bins of the Wenatchee yard remodeled to permit a quicker and more economical handling of the coal. This view is from the east side, showing how the railroad cars are unloaded. Trucks can drive directly over the tracks and into the bins. Mr. Boyd is a popular citizen of Wenatchee, prominent in lodge and civic affairs. (more…)

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By JoAnne Matsumura

As we gather to remember our fallen military heroes who’ve kept us free, let’s also remember our “other veterans” who rest among them—those individuals who had a long service in their profession or occupation.

Many of our community’s veterans are close to home in the Maple Valley–Hobart Cemetery, created in the late 1870s on land donated by Mr. and Mrs. C.O. Russell. (more…)

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