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Archive for December, 2019

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, December 31, 1925

Every miner at Black Diamond probably knows the three men whose likenesses appear above. If there is one who doesn’t, he should. They represent the three phases of coal mining most vital to the industry; efficiency and economy in operation, safety inspection, and first aid and mine rescue training.

In Supt. Paul Gallagher largely rests the success or failure of the mine’s operation. Closely related is the safety inspection, directed by Deputy State Mine Inspector, Geo. T. Wake, under the able supervision of Wm. R. Reese, Chief Inspector. And last but not least is John G. Schoning, of the United States Bureau of Mines, who patiently drills the men in the principles of first aid and mine rescue work. All three indispensable. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, December 30, 1913

Principal is coming meeting of International at Indianapolis, other that of State Federation of Labor

Delegates selected by referendum vote

Nine of ten or more to go East January 15 already known—smaller unions combine to reduce expenses

By C.J. Stratton

Two big labor conventions in progress at the same time will divide the attention and interest of the union coal miners of the state of Washington next month, and three score or more of the diggers of black diamonds will have the honor of sitting in them as delegates representing the United Mine Workers of America, of which this state forms District No. 10. (more…)

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Originally published in the Renton Historical Society & Museum Quarterly, December 2012

By Kent Sullivan

Northern Pacific depot in Renton, circa 1912. (RHM# 41.0568)

I live in Kirkland, am a member of the Northern Pacific Railway Historical Association (NPRHA), and am an avid researcher of the Northern Pacific’s (NP) line along the east side of Lake Washington, known as the Lake Washington Belt Line and, for much of its history, the 11th Subdivision of the Tacoma Division.

I became especially interested in the Renton area after I became the latest custodian of the train order signal that hung on the Renton depot for almost 70 years at the corner of 5th Street and Burnett Avenue. I assumed the story of the Renton depot would be very simple and was surprised to find it was a bit complicated, and thought that readers of this newsletter might enjoy hearing what I learned. (more…)

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Originally published in the Lake Sawyer Community Club newsletter, Winter 2019

By Bill Kombol

Jim Hawk at his Lake Sawyer home, March 25, 2017. Photo by Bill Kombol.

He’s lived on Lake Sawyer for nearly two-thirds of his life. That’s a long time for a 93-year-old who built his lake home in 1961. His name is Jim Hawk and he’s arguably done more to craft the Lake Sawyer we know today than any other person.

Jim Hawk was born in Seattle on April 27, 1926. His father, Ray Hawk, was of Dutch descent but left his Pennsylvania home at age 13. His mother, Mary Romano, was the daughter of Italian immigrants. His grandfather, Sam Romano, was blinded by a dynamite blast at age 18, returning to Italy where doctors restored his sight. Sam came back to Seattle and started a family-owned construction company, Romano Engineering, which developed the Riverton quarry and built highways, bridges, dams, and other projects. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, December 24, 1925

Christmas gives us another opportunity to extend a word of greeting to every member of the Pacific Coast family, and to wish the compliments of the season to all of you. Regardless of the vicissitudes of our daily lives throughout the year, when the Yuletide approaches we turn our thoughts towards the theme of “Peace on Earth, Good Will Toward Men.”

It is fitting then, that we should desire health, prosperity, and happiness for everyone. To some at the mines this will be their first Christmas with the company. Many others will count it their fifth, while there are some whose service runs back for many years. To every one we extend our cordial wishes for a Merry Christmas and Happy New Year.

E.C. Ward, President (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, December 19, 1982

Comments will be taken until December 24 on the draft environmental-impact statement on rezoning 402 acres in and next to the town of Black Diamond, proposed for a surface coal mine.

The John Henry No.1 Mine would be developed on a 500-acre site over a period of at least 17 years, with the two pits reaching depths of 265 feet. Waste would be stockpiled and returned to the pits, and there are plans for surface reclamation.

The mine is the project of Pacific Coast Coal Co. The site is northeast of the city, between the city’s northwest corner and Lake 12. It includes Mud Lake, the site of one pit, and Ginder Lake, which would not be involved. Plans also call for construction of processing and other facilities at the mine.

Copies of the statement are in Seattle, Black Diamond, Kent, Maple Valley, Muckleshoot and other libraries. Comments should be made to the King County Building and Land Development Division.

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, December 17, 1925

This isn’t a Santa Claus scene, though C.O. Hilen, manager of the Keithly Wood & Coal Co., the Pacific Coast Coal Company’s Everett branch, will probably expect old Kris Kringle to put in an appearance at the right time.

Mr. Hilen installed the fireplace in his office several months ago and the Camp Fire Girls of Everett participated in the ceremony of starting the first fire, the fuel for which was Diamond Briquets, of course. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, December 16, 1911

D.C. Botting named chairman and Capt. F.A. Hill, of Seattle, Secretary

The first meeting of the special commission, named by Lieut.-Gov. M.E. Hay by authority of the act of 1911 to revise coal mining laws, was held yesterday afternoon in the offices of State Coal Mine Inspector D.C. Botting. Beside Mr. Botting, Capt. F.A. Hill of Seattle, George Lamperly of Roslyn, and F.B. Warriner of Taylor, attended the meeting, E.J. McLean, of Wilkeson, being the only absentee.

D.C. Botting was elected chairman and Capt. Hill secretary of the commission.

At Captain Hill’s suggestion each member will consult coal operators and workers in his district and transmit to the commission all recommendations for legislation. These will be passed upon later by the entire board.

The use of safety lamps, the issuance of miners’ certificates, and records of employees were discussed at yesterday’s meeting and legislation on those subjects will be asked. The commission meets again at 2:30 p.m., January 9, at Captain Hill’s office, 411 Mutual Life Building.

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Originally published in the Maple Valley Bugle, December 2015

By D’Ann Tedford

Built in 1891 on Renton-Maple Valley road, the restored W.D. Gibbon General Merchandise store and post office is now located on Witte Road. It is open to the public on the 1st Saturday of each month, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. See also http://www.maplevalleyhistorical.com.

Visiting history at Maple Valley Historical Society’s site on Witte Road, one sees the name “Gibbon” prominently displayed on the 124-year-old restored building, “W.D. Gibbon General Merchandise.” In its years, the store also served as Maple Valley’s post office and it held a barbershop, remnants of which are visible during tours.

Gibbon had studied to be an educator but acquired the store that had been built in 1891 on Renton-Maple Valley road. His wife Lizzie had attended Washington Territorial University (now U of W) and became the first school-teacher in Black Diamond, seven miles south of the general store. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, December 10, 1925

Richard Goodhead, mine foreman at Burnett, has been a miner in this state almost as long as coal has been dug here. He has been with the Pacific Coast Coal Company at Burnett since the mine reopened several years ago, and prior to that time was at Franklin and Hyde mines.

Loyal to the company, and loyal to the men under him, he has built up the reputation of being a “Square-Shooter,” and a practical mining man. Proof of the esteem in which he is held is shown by the fact that his friends all call him “Dick.” (more…)

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