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Archive for March, 2020

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, March 31, 1911

Confident that among the seven Italians now in the county jail under sentence of vagrancy are two guilty of exploding the dynamite that Tuesday morning at 3:30 wrecked the home of Rasmus Christiansen, assistant superintendent of the Pacific Coast Coal Company at Black Diamond, Sheriff Robert T. Hodge is keeping four deputies at Black Diamond gathering evidence.

The sheriff also thinks that the presence of the deputies in Black Diamond will doubly insure peace in the present state of high feeling between the American miners and the Italians. It is not anticipated that this will break out in the absence of a known miscreant upon which to vent itself. No further arrests have been made.

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, March 30, 1911

Deputy sheriffs forced to beat back ominous mob which surrounds shack used as jail

Dynamiting outrage followed by demonstration in which citizens take part as peace officers

1—The wrecked Christiansen home. 2—Where dynamite was exploded. 3—Interior of home after explosion. 4—Rasmus Christiansen. 5—Deputy Hill, at left, jailing a suspect at Black Diamond.

One hundred and fifty Italians, displaying all the voluble excitability of their race when in a dangerous mood, formed an ominous cordon about the little wooden shack that serves as a jail at Black Diamond yesterday afternoon when deputy sheriffs, after scouring the mining town all day, took into custody seven of their countrymen among whose number the authorities believe will be found one or more responsible for the dynamite outrage perpetrated on the home of Rasmus Christiansen early yesterday morning. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, March 29, 1911

Dynamiters try to kill family, wrecking home

Whole town aroused by loud detonation

Their lives the object of a vengeful attempt to blow them into eternity, Mrs. and Mrs. Rasmus Christiansen, of Black Diamond, early this morning escaped the death planned for them only because the five or more sticks of giant powder planted alongside their home by the unidentified assassin was beneath a section of the house far removed from that where they were sleeping.

Although the partitions of the house were blown out, and it was left an entire wreck, none of the Christiansens was hurt. Their escape was due to the fact they slept in a room that received the least of the shock, and that its force was broken by the springs and mattress of the bed. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, March 28, 1911

Auditor’s office, on advice of prosecuting attorney, will reject claim of deputy sheriff

For the second time, the county commissioners yesterday approved the bill of Matt Starwich, a deputy sheriff in the Black Diamond district for his salary from January to September last year.

Deputy Auditor W.S. Lincoln, acting on an opinion from the prosecuting’s attorney’s office, says that he will again reject the bill, the figures in which are $855.75 this time.

The board of county commissioners that went out of office in January had reduced Starwich’s salary to $1 a month for the months in question. When the present commissioners took office they attempted to pay him for the time at $93.50 a month, his regular pay. But the auditor’s office held up the bill then as now.

Then the commissioners decided to get around the law by paying Starwich $125 a month until the pay he never got was “eaten up.” This was done for January. But Starwich said he had to keep his family and that he needed that money right away.

So Commissioners M.L. Hamilton and David McKenzie decided to allow the bill again. Rutherford voted no.

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, March 27, 2007

By Barbara Nilson

The families of Hobart pioneers, Rudolph and Julie (Gradishnick) Grady and Olga (Grady) and Rudy Petchnick, will be featured at the Sunday, April 15th reunion at the Hobart Community Church, at 1:30 p.m. The program is sponsored by the Maple Valley Historical Society. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, March 26, 1987

A marshy area adjacent to a small lake that lies southwest of Black Diamond may be one of the keys to the city’s future, if land developer Steve Graddon’s dream comes true.

Graddon presented his ambitious plan that involves a low-impact housing development and a nature preserve that would be the focus of “scientists from around the world,” to the Black Diamond city council Thursday, March 19.

At the center or the plan is Black Diamond Lake, or Chubb Lake as the old-timers call it. About 35 acres of the lake’s shore is made up of a forested sphagnum moss bog, one of only five known in the state. The bog is considered to be in pristine condition, thus making it more valuable to researchers. (more…)

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Originally published in “Now & Then,” The Seattle Times, March 26, 2000

By Paul Dorpat

At the foot of Dearborn Street, the Pacific Coast Company coal wharf extended far into Elliott Bay. Here, freshly painted and nearly new, the wharf is a year or two old. The scene dates from about 1903. (Courtesy of Lawton Gowey)

For soaring grandeur, the two towers of Pacific Coast Company’s coal wharf at the foot of Dearborn Street may be compared to the contemporary gantry cranes of the Port of Seattle’s Pier 46 complex. The open skeleton of the old coal towers suggests the stone filigree of a medieval cathedral, and the sublime symmetry strengthens this allusion.

Both the Cottage City and S.S. Garonne, the steamers left and right of the coal towers, had busy careers in Alaska. (more…)

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