Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Infrastructure’ Category

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, January 18, 1906

Survey runs from Tacoma east of Orillia and stops at junction of the NP and Columbia & Puget Sound

James F. McElroy, Charley Farrell, and A.T. Van de Vanter buy large tract of land in path of right-of-way

“The Milwaukee road will complete a trackage arrangement with the Columbia & Puget Sound and enter Seattle over their rails.”

That was the statement made to a reporter for The Times last night by a man who stands closer to those behind the local Milwaukee guns than any other. He has been closely connected with Northwestern railroad affairs for years and may be relied upon thoroughly. Continuing, he said:

“You may say safely that the Milwaukee will cross the mountains through Snoqualmie Pass. The road will then run down through Rattlesnake Prairie and strike the Cedar River at Maple Valley. It will run toward the Sound as far as the junction of the Northern Pacific and Columbia & Puget Sound and will then enter Seattle over the C&PS tracks. (more…)

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, January 15, 1906

Milwaukee practically forced to take Snoqualmie Pass and preparatory measures are all along that line

Three-mile tunnel from point near head of Lake Keechelus would insure a maximum grade of about 1 percent

Extensive coal fields reaching from Renton to Roslyn with gap at the summit, strong point in favor

Northern Pacific engineers laying out and building the Yakima & Valley Railroad have practically blocked the Milwaukee out of Naches Pass and forced the selection of the Snoqualmie gateway to the Sound. Coast officials of the new transcontinental line are making all their preparations for the use of Snoqualmie Pass and only a showing of impossibility in grades or some new advantage in Naches Pass will change the present plan.

As Milwaukee officials have now marked out the route for that line across this state, the road will connect either inside or just outside the city limits with the Columbia & Puget Sound following that road up through the Cedar River Valley and across to Rattlesnake Prairie up to that point the company will gain a maximum grade of 8/10 of one percent. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, January 10, 1979

By George and Dianne Wilson

Bob Kuster, above, is one of six skilled technicians who work very hard to see that the miles of wires and maze of equipment at the central office operate properly for Black Diamond telephone customers. (Voice photo by George Wilson)

Bob Kuster, above, is one of six skilled technicians who work very hard to see that the miles of wires and maze of equipment at the central office operate properly for Black Diamond telephone customers. (Voice photo by George Wilson)

Telephone service may not be as popular a conversational topic as the weather, but when there is a problem with the phone, you can count on hearing about it.

A group of six central office technicians work very hard to see that Black Diamond phone users don’t have trouble. The group serves Black Diamond, Maple Valley, Enumclaw, Buckley, Crystal Mountain, and Lester.

Dave Smith, Erwin Haussler, Frank Wise, George Williams, Owen Bing, and Bob Kuster with Ken Mead, foreman, all do their best to provide good phone service for users in this large area.

Bob Kuster recently took these reporters on a tour of the Pacific Northwest Bell telephone office in Black Diamond, describing the equipment and mechanics involved each time someone picks up their phone. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, January 1, 1896

A petition for a bridge across Cedar River at Maple Valley was filed with the board of county commissioners yesterday, with fifty influential signatures, setting forth that the road of which the bridge would form a part is a convenient outlet from main roadways on all sides, connecting on the east with the Sagerson, Witte, Black Diamond, and Kent roads, for all of which it makes the shortest possible connections with the roads to Sherwood, Snoqualmie Falls, Issaquah, Cedar Mountain, and Renton.

The petition further recites that fording at the point named is impractical at some seasons and always attended with more or less danger. Many of the people living south of Cedar River are practically cut off from Maple Valley, although some of them contrive to cross on the railroad trestle.

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the BDHS newsletter, Summer 2016

By William Kombol

Kuzaro home, November 18, 1939

Kuzaro home, November 18, 1939

There are a number of resources available to learn about the history of your home or lot. One of the best resources is the Puget Sound Regional Archives (PSRA), located on the campus of Bellevue College near Eastgate.

PSRA’s collection includes property record cards kept between 1937 and 1972. This is the best source of historic photographs for homes and commercial buildings. These old photos were taken by the King County Assessor with the tax parcel, date of the photo, and other notations written on the photo, from which excellent quality prints can be made. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, December 26, 1900

A Christmas Day event

Reports of tests received at city hall by telephone—Two weeks more will elapse before water is turned into the reservoirs—Assistant City Engineer Scott makes good his predictions

The Landsburg dam is used to divert drinking water from the Cedar River to the pipeline serving the City of Seattle. The original dam was constructed in 1900 and updated in 1935, as shown here. (From Black Diamond NOW.)

The Landsburg dam is used to divert drinking water from the Cedar River to the pipeline serving the City of Seattle. The original dam was constructed in 1900 and updated in 1935, as shown here. (From Black Diamond NOW.)

Cedar River water flowed into the city limits of Seattle Monday night at 10 o’clock through the mains of the new gravity system. Unknown to the general public the water from the river was let into the main pipe line filling it almost to its greatest capacity and was then allowed to flow into the main trunk sewer at Twelfth Avenue South and Lane Street, by which it found its way into Elliott Bay.

Twelve days ago Assistant City Engineer Scott , who has charge of the work on the pipe line and at the intake on the river decided if possible to carry out the prediction he made six months ago that water from Cedar River would flow into the city limits on Christmas day, 1900. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Seattle Sunday Times, December 25, 1955

By Lucile McDonald

Promoters once saw Renton as the future site of great industrial development. This illustration was in advertising literature about 1910. The artist conceived a line of piers along the lake front and vessels entering the Cedar River. Steamers and sailing vessels were shown on Lake Washington. – Courtesy Renton Chamber of Commerce.

Promoters once saw Renton as the future site of great industrial development. This illustration was in advertising literature about 1910. The artist conceived a line of piers along the lake front and vessels entering the Cedar River. Steamers and sailing vessels were shown on Lake Washington. –Courtesy Renton Chamber of Commerce.

The man who has lived in Renton longer than any other person—John E. Hayes, 13612 S.E. 128th St—well remembers the day in December, 1897, when the first standard-gauge train reached the town. He ought to; he was firing the engine.

The Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad had bought the narrow-gauge coal line of the Seattle & Walla Walla Railroad and extended it in 1882 to Black Diamond and Franklin. It left Seattle on a right-of-way shared with the Northern Pacific, a third rail being laid to accommodate the narrow-gauge cars bound for Renton. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »