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Archive for the ‘Infrastructure’ Category

Originally published in the Maplevalley Messenger, July 14, 1921

Dobson says work will be done as soon as possible and when money is available

The overhead bridge across the Milwaukee railroad in Maplevalley will be installed as soon as possible, said Commissioner Thomas Dobson in an interview Wednesday.

“Granges may pass resolutions from now until doomsday but without the money it is impossible for us to do the work at the present time although we realize the necessity for it and would like very much to see it built,” he said. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, July 1995

The old Lake Wilderness Conference building has new tenants and a new name. It is King County’s first community service center and be called Lake Wilderness Community Service Center. A grand opening is planned for August.

The old Lake Wilderness Conference building has new tenants and a new name. It is King County’s first community service center and be called Lake Wilderness Community Service Center. A grand opening is planned for August.

King County’s first Community Service Center located at Lake Wilderness Park in Maple Valley opens Wednesday, July 5, 1995 at 12 noon. King County Executive Gary Locke and community members will visit the Center at 1 p.m. A grand opening celebration will occur later in August. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, June 29, 1969

Before the Pacific States Lumber Co. closed its mill in 1939, Selleck was a neat little town with a school, meeting hall, water system, and post office.

The mill superintendent lived in house number 1, the company doctor and supervisors lived in the 300 row, and mill hands lived in the 200 and 500 rows. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 13, 1924

With the formal opening last Saturday of the new club house at Black Diamond, each of the three camps was able to boast of this long desired addition to the social facilities of the community. Newcastle’s club was the first to be completed, followed by the Burnett club and lastly the Black Diamond club. The building shown at the top of the picture is the Black Diamond club and that below is Burnett. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Tmes, June 9, 1968

A waterwheel built in 1888 to power a sawmill and blacksmith shop on the Horrocks ranch in Maple Valley will be preserved by the developers of Four Lakes, a residential district.

A waterwheel built in 1888 to power a sawmill and blacksmith shop on the Horrocks ranch in Maple Valley will be preserved by the developers of Four Lakes, a residential district.

Site preparation has begun on a 200-acre residential area on Cedar Grove Road in Maple Valley by the Four Lakes Development Co.

Four Lakes will have three quarters of a mile road frontage between the Hobart Road and the Maple Valley Highway.

Price range for the 150 lots of one to two and a half acres will be from $3,500 to $10,000, according to Walter Schaefer, president of the Four Lakes Co. Sales will begin in mid-June.

Four Lakes will offer a historic green-belt approach with a waterwheel and a blacksmith shop built shortly after the land was bought from the Northern Pacific Railroad in 1885 to be preserved.

Schaefer acquired the property this year from David Horrocks, grandson of James Horrocks, who pioneered the property. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, May 26, 1906

Only fair weather necessary to make Georgetown firemen’s picnic a great success

A fair day is all that is necessary to make the gathering of the volunteer fire departments of the region at Georgetown tomorrow the most successful affair of its kind ever held hereabouts. The three Rainier fire companies of Georgetown and the citizens have been arranging for the big picnic and hose-cart run at Lincoln Park on a magnificent scale. Thousands are expected to attend.

The loving cup presented by the citizens of the town will be contested for by teams from Columbia City, Kent, Renton, Black Diamond, Enumclaw, Auburn, and the Georgetown companies. There may be other entries made before tomorrow.

A smaller cup will be competed for by the three Rainier companies. It was presented by Cashier C.H. Upper of the Georgetown Bank.

A parade will take place shortly after noon and the balance of the day will be given over to the picnic and its program of entertainment. The plans provide that the winner of the big loving cup shall hold a similar event next year at the town where that company holds forth. The cup must be won two years in succession before it becomes the permanent property of any company.

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, May 22, 1991

The gym was moved to 25511 Lawson Street on February 12, 1992, at a cost of $100,000.

The gym was moved to 25511 Lawson Street on February 12, 1992, at a cost of $100,000.

The Black Diamond Community Center Board has the building, the property, and the moving company. The only thing it’s missing to move the old Enumclaw School District gymnasium down Highway 169 to its new home off Lawson Street is $35,000.

The board purchased the historical building from Enumclaw School District for a nominal fee earlier this year and has been working hard to line up a moving company and funds to move it to the three acres of city-owned property off Lawson Street across from City Hall.

The Black Diamond City Council granted the board a special use permit for the property at its regular meeting Thursday night. (more…)

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