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Archive for the ‘Infrastructure’ Category

Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier, December 16, 1921

Farmers living in the White River Valley were obliged to drive their cattle to the hills for safety.

Renton, Tukwila, and Riverton are under water and people traveling about the towns are obliged to wear hip boots or go on a raft.

Here in Enumclaw many basements were flooded by surface water but little serious damage has been done. Travel between here and Seattle on the highway was stopped by high water near Kent. That city suffered considerable from inundation.

Estimated cost of damage to roads and other losses in King County may run over $400,000.

The flood conditions have been worse than in any season for many years.

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, November 14, 1924

Deep down in the canyon of the Carbon River, and some distance down the stream from the mine tunnel entrances, is situated the bunkers and tipple of Carbonado Mine. The topography of the place fortunately permits the use of gravity to a very large extent in the handling of the coal. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, October 26, 1983

By Herb Belanger
Times South bureau

Diane and Ed Gokey live near Black Diamond’s leaking water reservoir, which is behind trees in background.

Diane and Ed Gokey live near Black Diamond’s leaking water reservoir, which is behind trees in background.

Faced with potentially serious consequences, the Black Diamond City Council is taking steps to repair or replace its aging 250,000-gallon water reservoir on the east side of town.

After receiving details about the reservoir’s condition from a preliminary study, the council last week directed that the level of water in the reservoir be lowered to 6 feet instead of 9 ½ feet to decrease the pressure on the structure.

A special meeting has been called for 7 p.m. tomorrow at City Hall to discuss funding a more detailed study by the engineering firm, R.W. Beck and Associates of Seattle, estimated to cost $3,800. Also under discussion will be installation of an alarm system to alert residents in two houses below the reservoir. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, October 17, 1924

One feature of the Pacific Coast Coal Company bunkers on Seattle Harbor, not found in many other ports, is the fact that deep sea vessels may get prompt repairs, when necessary, while bunker coal is being loaded. Immediately adjacent to the bunkers are the large shops of the Pacific Coast Engineering Company, a subsidiary of The Pacific Coast Company, whose trained men and modern equipment are capable of handling any marine repair work except dry docking.

This work is frequently performed while the ship is loading coal, and the vessel can remain in the same slip until the job is completed without interfering with other operations. The picture shows the Westward Ho, an 8,800-ton U.S. Shipping Board carrier, taking on bunkers while undergoing extensive alterations at the same time by the Pacific Coast Engineering Company. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, October 2, 1897

Receiver C.J. Smith returned yesterday afternoon from an extended trip to the East in connection with the business of the Oregon Improvement Company.

The company’s property will be sold on November 5, and thereafter the purpose is to have extensive improvements made on the waterfront in Seattle, including the filling in of land south of King Street to Grant, and east of Third Avenue. But the most important is the erection of a brick warehouse on Ocean Hose, commensurate with the growing business that is sure to come to the company. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, September 26, 1979

Roy Freeman, architect of the proposed new county (shown above) still insists that, indeed, its time is here. Speaking at last week’s meeting of the Maple Valley Chamber of Commerce, Freeman says he has traveled 40,000 miles promoting the plan since 1972. The Create Cascade County group still has some left-over bumper stickers and $63 in the bank.

Cascade County, once formed, could make a go of it, Freeman said. The tax base in the proposed area has increased from $295 million in the early 1970s to more than $500 million. In 1974 he estimated $2.5 million was needed to run the new county, with tax revenue totaling $3.1 million.

“At present,” he argued, “we’re being run from Seattle.”

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, September 22, 1976

Representative Frances North of North Bend says the purchase of ten acres in the town of Black Diamond’s Green River watershed has been approved by separate state agencies that administer funds for the State Parks and Recreation Commission. (more…)

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