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Archive for the ‘Infrastructure’ Category

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, April 18, 1979

By Teresa Hensley

Circled above is the low area in the right abutment of the masonry dam.

Circled above is the low area in the right abutment of the masonry dam.

“There is no imminent danger, and people should not be alarmed,” said Colonel John A. Poteat, the Army Corps Seattle District Engineer, in a press release last week from Seattle City Light about the masonry dam above the Cedar River.

In an earlier press conference it was revealed that the dam could prove unsafe in the event of a major flood.

Conditions which could trigger such an emergency—described as “a flood on top of a flood” by Joe Recchi, acting superintendent of City Light—have never been approached in the 75 years of the project. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, April 15, 1992

Black Diamond’s new waste-water flushing tank is near the entrance to the city cemetery and is constructed of concrete. (Photo by Brenda Berube.)

Black Diamond’s new waste-water flushing tank is near the entrance to the city cemetery and is constructed of concrete. (Photo by Brenda Berube.)

It’s not pretty, but it’s functional.

At least that’s what Bill Lee, Black Diamond’s waste water project construction manager and city consultant, says of the city’s flushing tank recently erected at the Black Diamond Cemetery.

When operational, the concrete box will provide 20,000 gallons of water to flush a siphon in the waste water system along Roberts Drive.

According to Lee, there’s a drop in the pipe at Roberts Drive, and waste water has to go up a 24-foot hill before it flows out of the city. The flushing tank will send a rush of water through the system, pushing stray solids through the system.

The building is a tall, square concrete box at the entrance of the cemetery.

“Of all the options we looked at,” Lee said, “this was the least obnoxious.” (more…)

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Maple Valley Historical Society, March 1987

Here’s where me and the railroad got together.

My brother went up to Maple Valley for some reason or other and saw this gang of railroad men working to save the track that was being washed out. Being nosy, he went up to the foreman and asked if they were hiring anybody and he said yes, and get anyone else you can.

He came home and got me and we started work filling gunny sacks with sand at 4:00 p.m. and didn’t stop til 4:00 p.m. the next day. The rain never let up and gunny sacks got hard to get because everyone else needed them too for the same reason we did. We wound up using sacks that had been filled with rock salt and the salt cut our hands making them very sore. We didn’t have the little bags they use nowadays but the 100-pound size which we about two-thirds filled. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, April 11, 1979

Wall-raising day for the new Coast-to-Coast Hardware store at Four Corners.

Wall-raising day for the new Coast-to-Coast Hardware store at Four Corners.

It was “Wall Raising Day” at Four Corners on April 2 for the Coast-to-Coast Hardware store which will move from Wilderness Village to its new site this coming June.

Huge tilt-up panels of reinforced concrete were lifted into place by the crane operator and secured by a half dozen other skilled workmen within 6 ½ hours. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, April 7, 2015

By Bill Kombol

Railroads played a key role in the development of most King County towns, including Ravensdale. The arrival of the nation’s second transcontinental railway, the Northern Pacific (NP) in 1883 dramatically accelerated growth throughout the Washington Territory.

The development of a production-scale coal mine required a rail link to deliver the massive equipment needed to operate the mine and to transport the coal to market.

The extension of the Columbia and Puget Sound (C&PS) railway in 1884 from Renton by Henry Villard’s Oregon Improvement Company enabled the coal mines at Cedar Mountain (1884), Black Diamond (late 1884), Franklin (1885), and Danville (1896) to begin production. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, April 4, 1979

In projecting Maple Valley’s population growth in the next decade, writer Ed Zapel believes it convenient to divide the area into three sub-areas as shown above. By the year 2000, there will be mind-boggling changes in each of these sections.

In projecting Maple Valley’s population growth in the next decade, writer Ed Zapel believes it convenient to divide the area into three sub-areas as shown above. By the year 2000, there will be mind-boggling changes in each of these sections.

Some preliminary work has been completed in outlining safety improvements for the S.E. 216th intersection in Maple Valley, Jerry D. Zirkle, district administrator for the State Department of Transportation, told Doreen Hunt, secretary of the Greater Maple Valley Chamber of Commerce, this week.

Intentions, based on interviews not yet completed with business persons in the vicinity of the intersection, include a left-turn lane providing access to 216th from SR 169.

“Additional clarity would be provided with curbs to identify access locations to the adjacent businesses,” Zirkle said.

“Throughout the area,” he added, “new striping and pavement marking buttons will identify the lane lines. Additional sight distance will be furnished by removing a portion of the high bridge rail as well as removing brush which obstructs the view. After this work is completed this summer we will again conduct a speed study and consider reducing the speed from its present level on SR 169.” (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, March 31, 1908

Fifteen minutes before a train loaded with 200 passengers would have been on it, the Columbia and Puget Sound Railroad bridge across the Cedar River beyond Maple Valley, fell under the burden of a coal train and plunged six cars of coal instead of the cars of human beings into the river.

Had the coal train succeeded in getting across, there is no doubt that the passenger train would have plunged into the river, still swollen by recent floods and no one knows how many lives would have been lost. (more…)

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