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Archive for the ‘Mining’ Category

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, July 16, 1925

First prize was awarded the Keithly Wood & Coal Company of Everett for the best industrial float in the Fourth of July parade in the Snohomish County metropolis. The Keithly Wood & Coal Company is the Pacific Coast Coal Company’s branch in Everett, and last year also won first prize in the parade. Six dappled grey horses drew the attractive float shown above, while the four young ladies garbed in black and white costumes danced before “Old King Coal” and his diminutive aides. Diamond Briquets and Black Diamond Lump were emphasized in the general design and decorations. C.O. Hilen is the manager of the company’s Everett agency. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, July 9, 1925

Probably the youngest First Aid Team in the world, the Black Diamond Midgets, ranging in age from 7 to 9 years, were a feature attraction at the Independence Day celebration in Black Diamond. The boys are training for an exhibition drill at the State Meet to be held July 25. Johnny Gallagher is captain of the team, the other members including Roy Hale, Jimmy Nicholson, Oliver Rouse, Harold Lloyd, Bennie Hughes, and Elmon Rouse. Harold Lloyd, Sr., is the instructor. (more…)

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Originally published in Carbon River Heritage, July 1986

Photo by Nancy Irene Hall

June 22, 1986, the Tacoma Model T Club posed at the Wilkeson Arch to commemorate its 60th anniversary. The cars used were 1926 models. The beautiful historic arch was given to the town of Wilkeson on July 2, 1926, by the Wilkeson Booster Club.

The present day Wilkeson Booster Club is planning to recrown her soon with a new cedar log. It cost $2,000 to build it originally and all the money was raised by the Wilkeson Boosters. It was made of Wilkeson Sandstone quarried just a few miles from the site on which the arch now stands. For 60 years everyone going to the Carbon River entrance to Mount Rainier has passed under this grand monument. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, July 2, 1925

Eyes steady in the face of danger
Resourceful, true, a man of soldier-worth
Who braves, for loved ones’ peace and comfort
The dark, deep-delving trenches of the earth. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, June 2007

Story and photos by Barbara Nilson

Paul Bartholomew and his daughter, Karen Lindquist, stand in front of the foundation for the press factory that made clay pipe.

The daffodils are blooming in Taylor as they do every spring to welcome back those who have fond memories of living there when it was a booming coal and clay company town. Taylor existed from 1892-1947, when the Seattle Public Utilities formed the Cedar River Watershed and closed the area to the public.

Each April the Utility District and Friends of the Cedar River Watershed offer the walking tour into Taylor for two weekends at a cost of $15. Participants gather at the Cedar River Watershed Visitors/Education Center for a slideshow of early day Taylor, then climb into vans for the 10-mile drive to the site.

The Education Center has interpretive exhibits that show where our water comes from and historical materials about the watershed area. It is an interesting place to browse anytime of the year. I especially like the musical artwork in the rain drum court where drops of water play tunes on the various drums. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, June 28, 2005

By Kathleen E. Kear

Miners at the Ravensdale Northwestern Improvement Co., Mine, circa 1912. The man seated on the ground is Leander Thibaut who perished with thirty other men in the November 15, 1915 Ravensdale Mine accident. Photo courtesy of Black Diamond Historical Society

Preparations for the 2nd Annual Black Diamond Miners Days are well underway for the weekend of Friday, July 8 through Sunday, July 10.

Hosting the event once again is the Black Diamond Merchant Partnership. The event began during the summer of 2004 as a way to encourage community members and guests to come and get to know the various businesses within the City of Black Diamond. The event also grew out of an appreciation of the miners and their families who helped establish Black Diamond. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Daily Post-Intelligencer, June 26, 1884

The idea of subsidizing the Columbia & Puget Sound Company to enable it to complete its road up Cedar River was a good one, but not so good as another that has since been put forth. The new idea is to loan the company the needed money, and it was proposed by Mr. Howard, the company’s representative. The terms upon which the money is to be loaned will strike the reader as most fair, and will be found reported in full in the following. (more…)

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