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Archive for the ‘Mining’ Category

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 24, 1906

Chief Engineer James Anderson of the Pacific Coast Company has been instructed to prepare estimates of cost for double-tracking the line of the Columbia & Puget Sound between Seattle and Black River Junction. The work will be done immediately. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 21, 1923

Just to indicate where some of the coal goes which the mines at Black Diamond, Newcastle, and Burnett are constantly producing, the Bulletin this week presents a few scenes recently taken at the coal bunkers of the Pacific Coast Coal Company.

In the upper corner to the left is shown long rows of sacked Black Diamond lump, waiting to be loaded on the naval vessel, Gold Star, the steamer to the right in the oval just below. This coal, 36,378 sacks, was shipped to various Government schools and radio stations in Alaska. The center view shows the ship’s sling loading coal into the hold. On the right, upper view, is another scene showing the sacked coal ready for shipment, while below is the steamer Birmingham City taking steam coal for her own boilers. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, August 23, 2016

By Bill Kombol

Maple Valley’s third depot dates to 1953, shortly after it was built.

Maple Valley’s third depot dates to 1953, shortly after it was built.

Over the near century from 1885 to 1982, Maple Valley hosted three different railroad stations, all located in old Maple Valley just north of where Highway 18 overpasses SR-169. This photo of the third Maple Valley depot dates to 1953 shortly after it was built.

The Maple Valley station was an important cog for directing rail traffic as trains could be switched to Black Diamond, Taylor, or up the Cedar River through Landsburg into the watershed. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, August 16, 2016

By Bill Kombol

This photo of the Maple Valley railway depot was taken in 1948 as viewed looking northbound along the Maple Valley highway (aka SR-169). The depot was also used as the dispatcher’s office.

It was the second railroad station in Maple Valley, replacing the first constructed in 1885, when the original rail line was built to access coal from the newly developed town of Black Diamond. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, June 14, 1978

By George and Dianne Wilson

Darrel and Jewell McCloud are here seen at their Black Diamond home among their gorgeous flowers which include 350 rosebushes “and much, much morel”

Darrel and Jewell McCloud are here seen at their Black Diamond home among their gorgeous flowers which include 350 rosebushes “and much, much more!”

Over 350 roses, more than 150 tuberous begonias, plus much, much more can be seen in one gorgeous spot in Black Diamond! No, it’s not a park or a nursery; it’s the home of Darrel and Jewell McCloud on 1st Street, across from the elementary school.

When the McClouds moved here 34 years ago from Ellensburg, they brought with them six or eight roses. Over the years, their collection has “grown like Topsy,” often through the Valentine’s Day gifts of rose bushes for Jewell from their son Michael. They now have 56 new roses imported from Canada. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 14, 1923

If working a shift in Black Diamond Mine was no harder for the four men shown above than it was for them to pose for this picture, there would always be a mad scramble among the men to see who could get the first man-trip down.

At the left we introduce to you, George Belt, and next to him, Fred Cunningham, a former Issaquah miner. The man next in line is R.E. “Curly” Campbell and the young Hercules at the extreme right is Darwin Walton. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, August 9, 2016

By Bill Kombol

No piece of railroad equipment has inspired more slang terms than the caboose. It is the cage, hack, crummy, parlor, or hut – it is the zoo, the coop or the brain wagon.

No piece of railroad equipment has inspired more slang terms than the caboose. It is the cage, hack, crummy, parlor, or hut – it is the zoo, the coop, or the brain wagon.

According to the 1948 Rotogravure magazine article about the Pacific Coast Railroad (PCRR), “Railroading has produced as distinctive a lexicon as it is possible for forthright and uninhibited men to dream up.” (more…)

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