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Archive for the ‘Mining’ Category

Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, February 16, 1919

Observations in Army and in mining camps show chief source of contamination is mess kit.

“Watch your dish washing and avoid the influenza!”

A system of washing dishes that will employ complete sterilization is probably the most effective way of preventing the spread of influenza, according to Dr. Ira. C. Brown, medical inspector of the city schools, who bases his opinion on personal experiences in fighting the disease at the Black Diamond and Franklin mines and also on the reports of officers of the United States Army Medical Corps. (more…)

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Originally published in the Maple Valley Neighbors, February 2020

By JoAnne Matsumura, Maple Valley Historical Society

This special valentine was not your usual cutout style or a postcard of the day. It wasn’t cupids with angel wings bringing bouquets of flowers, nor those little candy hearts with fun and silly messages.

To Mr. and Mrs. Lapinski, the valentine from Uncle Sam that week regarding their son Ben, who was somewhere in France, was a heartfelt welcome greeting.

So grateful and thankful were they that the “Letter from France” was published in the Enumclaw Courier newspaper on February 14, 1919, as follows. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, February 12, 1997

By Paul Schmidt
The Courier-Herald

Although coal production is down 50 percent at Black Diamond’s John Henry Mine following a rain-induced slide Jan. 30, all 45 employees are working, a mine official said Monday.

Crews won’t be able to clear away mud in the slide area until water is pumped away, said Bruno Ridolfi, manager of operations for the Pacific Coast Coal mine. Removing the mud will be a “fairly slow” process, he said. (more…)

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5-year project to put life back into Franklin

Originally published in The Seattle Times, February 11, 1994

By Keith Ervin
Seattle Times South bureau

Lindsay Larson leads a group of students through the old cemetery they are cleaning up. Many of the deaths were caused by mining accidents. (Jimi Lott, Seattle Times)

HISTORIC FRANKLIN—Hidden beneath the maples and cottonwoods of the Green River Gorge are secrets unseen by the casual visitor.

Some of those secrets are a little more visible today than they were yesterday, thanks to eighth-graders from Cedar Heights Junior High School in Covington. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, February 11, 1926

Two monster Diamond Briquets, each weighing more than 200 pounds, proved a great drawing card in the Pacific Coast Coal Company’s booth at the Southwest Washington Manufacturers’ Exposition held in Tacoma last week.

A guessing contest was held, a ton of Diamond Briquets being the prize for the person guessing closest to the actual weight of the monster briquet shown on the mantlepiece. More than 3,000 guesses were recorded. J.F. Torrence is the manager of the Tacoma agency of the Pacific Coast Coal Company. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, February 4, 1926

Every day from 450 to 500 tons of Diamond Briquets are loaded into railroad cars for shipment to almost every point where fuel is used between Canada and Mexico on the Pacific Coast. This scene shows how the briquets are lowered from the cooling conveyor into the cars. Thousands of tons of Diamond Briquets will soon be distributed throughout the orchards of Eastern Washington, where they will be burned to protect the fruit blossoms from the ravages of frost this spring. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, January 30, 2007

By Kathleen Kear

Getting ready to celebrate her 100th birthday is Ruby Favro Androsko Keeney (left). Also pictured with Keeney is son, Joe Androsko (center), and husband, Lee (right).

Looking forward to celebrating her first century of life, former Black Diamond resident Ruby Favro Androsko Keeney has plenty of tales to share about growing up in Black Diamond.

Born on February 4, 1907, to father, Joe Favro (a Black Diamond coal miner), and mother, Mary (a stay-at-home mom), Keeney grew up to become one of thirteen Black Diamond High School graduates in the class of 1926. Soon after graduation, she went to work at the Black Diamond Bakery. (more…)

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