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Archive for the ‘Mining’ Category

Originally published in “Now & Then,” The Seattle Times, March 26, 2000

By Paul Dorpat

At the foot of Dearborn Street, the Pacific Coast Company coal wharf extended far into Elliott Bay. Here, freshly painted and nearly new, the wharf is a year or two old. The scene dates from about 1903. (Courtesy of Lawton Gowey)

For soaring grandeur, the two towers of Pacific Coast Company’s coal wharf at the foot of Dearborn Street may be compared to the contemporary gantry cranes of the Port of Seattle’s Pier 46 complex. The open skeleton of the old coal towers suggests the stone filigree of a medieval cathedral, and the sublime symmetry strengthens this allusion.

Both the Cottage City and S.S. Garonne, the steamers left and right of the coal towers, had busy careers in Alaska. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, March 25, 1926

When the inventor of the Jones system of lubrication for mine car wheels recently visited Burnett, Master Mechanic A.L. McBlaine was able to show him just how the system worked on the cars used in the haulage. This picture shows McBlaine pointing out the features of the Jones bearing to the inventor. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, March 20, 2007

By Barbara Nilson

Pacific Coast Coal Co. morning shift poses sitting on electric engines and empty coal cars outside the boarding house in Rainbow Town. The coal bunkers are in the background with the small hose-coal bunker to the right of the rear of the line of coal cars. A track straightener is in the foreground. — 1909 Asahel Curtis photo, courtesy of the Washington State Historical Society, Tacoma, and Bill Kombol, Palmer Coking Coal Co.

Milt Swanson is a historical treasure. He is a walking, talking encyclopedia with fascinating tales of his home town Newcastle/Coal Creek. He’s lived on the same piece of property for 84 years in a company house, on top of a mine shaft and next to the former company hotel and saloon. Across the street was Finn Town and the up the hill was Red Town.

He said when he was a kid, his pals and him named the various areas of the mining camp. The houses on the hill were red, so that was “Red Town”; closer to him the houses were white so naturally that was “White Town” and the area with all different colors was “Rainbow Village.” (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, March 18, 1926

Though the men who dig the coal seldom see it after it leaves the mine, they know that the product of their labor will go to warm the homes of many cities and towns. This picture shows one of the Ford delivery trucks of the Pacific Coast Coal Company from which is being delivered a load of Newcastle Lump. This truck is designed for quick and light deliveries and is able to haul its load anywhere that a car can be driven. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, March 15, 2000

By Cecilia Nguyen

For years Black Diamond has struggled to develop a plan that would make the city economically self-sufficient while maintaining the small town character.

A strong local economy with a healthy tax base would provide Black Diamond the much-needed funds to improve its capital facilities.

Financial relief for the small, former mining town may soon be a reality. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, March 14, 1984

By Eulalia Tollefson

Hundreds of area citizens, in an eleventh hour move, rallied around Pacific Coast Coal Company last week in support of the proposed John Henry No. 1 mine.

The John Henry is a surface mining proposal that would allow for removal of about 1,100 tons of coal from the earth daily on 516 acres of Pacific Coast owned land in south King County.

It is bounded on the southeast by the Green River Gorge Road and by 270th Ave. S.E. on the east side. About 100 acres lie within incorporated Black Diamond city limits. The remainder is in adjacent King County. (more…)

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Originally published in the South County Journal, March 12, 2002

City wants contract to be renegotiated

By Mike Archbold
Journal Reporter

BLACK DIAMOND — Fire District 17 may decide to part ways with the Black Diamond Fire Department, which would leave the district looking for another way to provide fire and emergency medical protection to its residents.

Black Diamond City Administrator Jason Paulsen said last week that the city decided to terminate and renegotiate its contract with District 17. The agreement officially ended Dec. 31, 2001, but the district is still receiving fire services from the city-operated department. (more…)

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