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Archive for the ‘People’ Category

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, November 12, 1986

By Eulalia Tollefson

Dan Palmer, shown with his dog, Puppu, singing ‘Black Diamond Mines.’

Dan Palmer, shown with his dog, Puppu, singing ‘Black Diamond Mines.’

Dan Palmer’s distinctive style of easy listenin’ folk music and a catchy, nostalgic song called “Black Diamond Mines” have earned exposure on radio KEZX—exposure Palmer hopes will draw the interest of music scouts.

Palmer and his trademark—a devoted 15-year-old pooch named Puppu—are familiar to area folk who frequent local restaurants, taverns, and night spots.

Everywhere from Boots Tavern, the Black Diamond Saloon, and the Amber Inn to the Pick and Shovel in Wilkeson, Palmer draws crowds with a variety of folk music.

From old time blues to bluegrass he entertains with old favorites and originals like “Black Diamond Mines,” a song he wrote in honor of Black Diamond’s 100th birthday celebration.

The ballad was born of Palmer’s fascination for the town’s coal mining history. Much of it is a tribute to Dooda Vernarelli, a colorful town character much loved by old and young alike. (more…)

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By By JoAnne Matsumura and Cary Collins

One hundred years ago—at 11 a.m., November 11, 1918—World War I came to a close. There were cheers and tears, singing and dancing, hugging and kissing. Spirits ran high. The men and boys would soon be coming home to their families, wives, and sweethearts. The planning began.

From small towns to the big cities, Americans welcomed and greeted their heroes with bands playing. The doughboys arrived by boat, train, bus, and some lucky enough to catch a ride with their fellows heading in the same direction. There were parades, community gatherings, speeches of appreciation, and presentations of honor. Who could forget the long awaited taste of mom’s apple pie? (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, November 9, 1988

By McKay Jenkins

Remove the chain from the yellow caboose sitting in front of the Black Diamond Historical Society and you’ll open a door to the city’s history.

Inside, beneath the rotting ceilings and creaking floorboards, is a dilapidated testament to the men who once hauled their livelihoods from the bowels of the earth.

The museum that once housed the town’s train depot now has a train pulled up in front of the station. All that remains is a lot of restoration work for volunteers, said Bob Eaton, the museum’s president.

The caboose was built by Pacific Car and Foundry in Renton in 1921 for the Northern Pacific Railway. Weyerhaeuser then bought it to transport wood, and eventually gave it to the Puget Sound Railway Historical Association. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, November 7, 1979

The above plaque, now attached to the front of the Maple Valley Food Center building at SE 216th and Maple Valley Highway, was unveiled Saturday evening, Oct. 27, with Joe Mezzavilla and thirteen members of his immediate family in attendance. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, November 7, 1924

Newcastle has always enjoyed the reputation of having one of the finest club organizations in existence among the employees of the Pacific Coast Coal Company. Naturally then, it would be expected that they would possess a fine home.

That such is the case can be seen from the half-tone shown herewith which gives a fair idea of the commodious quarters occupied by the club. In the rear is a hall in which dances are held, and which is equipped also with a ladies’ rest room, check room, and kitchen. The front of the building is utilized by the club for its card and pool tables. “Hen” Roberts is manager of the club. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, October 26, 1988

By Brenda Berube
The Courier-Herald

After months of debate, Black Diamond City Council members denied developer Steve Metcalf a rezone on just under one acre of land near the John Henry No. 1 mine, where Metcalf was planning to build multifamily housing units. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, October 26, 1983

By Herb Belanger
Times South bureau

Diane and Ed Gokey live near Black Diamond’s leaking water reservoir, which is behind trees in background.

Diane and Ed Gokey live near Black Diamond’s leaking water reservoir, which is behind trees in background.

Faced with potentially serious consequences, the Black Diamond City Council is taking steps to repair or replace its aging 250,000-gallon water reservoir on the east side of town.

After receiving details about the reservoir’s condition from a preliminary study, the council last week directed that the level of water in the reservoir be lowered to 6 feet instead of 9 ½ feet to decrease the pressure on the structure.

A special meeting has been called for 7 p.m. tomorrow at City Hall to discuss funding a more detailed study by the engineering firm, R.W. Beck and Associates of Seattle, estimated to cost $3,800. Also under discussion will be installation of an alarm system to alert residents in two houses below the reservoir. (more…)

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