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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, October 13, 1904

While adjusting brushes in a high-power dynamo, W.S. MacDonald, electrician at the coal mines at Lawson, near Black Diamond, was electrocuted last evening at 6:30 o’clock. Death was probably instantaneous. Continue Reading »

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, October 12, 1977

By Dianne Wilson

A week of pumping by King County has drawn Horseshoe Lake back from foundations, and the sandbag walls put up to protect them. (Photo by Marcus R. Donner)

A week of pumping by King County has drawn Horseshoe Lake back from foundations, and the sandbag walls put up to protect them. (Photo by Marcus R. Donner)

A preliminary planned unit-development that will completely surround Horseshoe Lake (currently dry), west of Black Diamond with houses, has been approved by the county zoning examiner.

William Coski’s proposed plat will involve a total of 47 acres, including about 5.5 acres of lake. The land will be divided into 33 building sites.

The lake, which lies in the middle of the Public Utility District, Coski plans to develop as a year-round facility. This required a revision in the plans originally submitted to the county to reduce the amount of development near the lake itself. Continue Reading »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, October 11, 1923

Thirteen years ago the present rock dump of Mine 11, at Black Diamond, was begun. Though the mine had been in operation for many years prior to 1910, it was then that the present dump was started when the old dump caught fire. This dump is today an imposing pile of rock and waste material brought out of the mine, and it is constantly growing.

Like a small mountain it rises out of the wide expanse of the valley and is visible for a considerable distance. At night the numerous fires which blaze constantly from its base to its summit make it loom up much after the manner of the biblical Pillar of Fire. Continue Reading »

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, July 28, 2015

By Bill Kombol

Photo # PI-24764 comes courtesy of Museum of History & Industry and shows a 1925 Chrysler Phaeton Six at the park’s entrance.

Photo # PI-24764 comes courtesy of Museum of History & Industry and shows a 1925 Chrysler Phaeton Six at the park’s entrance.

In September 1925 the Seattle Post-Intelligencer published an article about Flaming Geyser Park and its unique gas-bubbling spring. At that time it was a privately-owned facility providing campsites, stoves, restrooms, a swimming pool fed by the Green River, fish hatchery, and round picnic tables cut from six-foot sections of fir trees. Continue Reading »

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, October 4, 1978

Residents and neighbors of the Selleck-Kangley community in southwestern King County are calling a Townhall Meeting on Tuesday, Oct. 10 at 8 p.m. in the Selleck schoolhouse to “deal themselves into the dispute over the Selleck water system,” according to conveners of the meeting.

At the conclusion of the meeting a vote will be taken to register the consensus of the community.

Owners of the Selleck water system have been ordered by the King County Superior Court to carry out 28 directives of the King County Health Department. Continue Reading »

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, October 4, 1904

The Pacific Coast Company has inaugurated an eight-hour day and raised wages of all laborers in its mines.

The changes are made effective October 1.

The increase is voluntary on the part of the company and was made without application by the men. In fact, the first intimation the men had of the changed conditions was given when notices were posted under the direction of Chief Engineer James Anderson announcing the higher scale was effective. Continue Reading »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, October 4, 1923

Indication of the wide-spreading use of Diamond Briquets is seen in the growing demand for this fuel for consumption in the smudge pots of Yakima Valley orchards. Each spring, during the budding and blossoming season, Yakima orchardists strive to save their crops from the ravages of late frosts by the use of smudge pots placed beneath the flower-laden trees. Continue Reading »