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Posts Tagged ‘African-Americans’

Originally published in the Seattle Star, August 1, 1902

Says mining town is impregnated with vice, and that prosecuting attorney should interfere to enforce decency and order

That he has failed in his efforts to control vice and crime in his own community and that it is now up to the highest peace officers of the county to take a hand in the game is the belief of Deputy Sheriff and Constable J.P. Morris, of Franklin, the largest coal mining town in the county, 32 miles southeast of Seattle. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, May 21, 1986

By Herb Belanger

Don Mason, left, Carl Steiert, Ted Barner, and Bob Eaton stroll through what was Franklin. (Richard S. Heyza/Seattle Times.)

Don Mason, left, Carl Steiert, Ted Barner, and Bob Eaton stroll through what was Franklin. (Richard S. Heyza/Seattle Times.)

Tough old coal-mining towns like Black Diamond always have had their share of characters, but the “Flying Frog” is one of Carl Steiert’s favorites.

The “Frog” actually was a Belgian named Emile Raisin who ran a taxi service between Black Diamond, a company town with one bar, and Ravensdale, which had 10 saloons where miners quenched the thirst they developed toiling underground. (more…)

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Originally published in the Washington State Historical Society’s quarterly journal, Columbia, Spring 1994

By John Hanscom

Drawing of Franklin, circa 1887.

Bird’s-eye-view map of Franklin Mine and its environs, c. 1890. (Courtesy of Don Mason and the Black Diamond Historical Society.)

Henry Villard launched the Oregon Improvement Company in October 1880 as part of his grand scheme to dominate the development of the Pacific Northwest. By 1883 he had tied the area to the national economy with the completion of the Northern Pacific Railroad. Expansive development of the Pacific Northwest seemed assured.

To fuel Villard’s steamships and locomotives, a dependable coal supply was a high priority. By February 1881 the Oregon Improvement Company had acquired the Seattle Coal and Transportation Company, including the Newcastle Mine east of Lake Washington, at a cost of one million dollars. The Seattle and Walla Walla Railroad (renamed the Columbia and Puget Sound) was also purchased for over half a million dollars to transport coal from mine to Seattle bunkers. Villard hired John L. Howard under a five-year contract at $10,000 per year as general manager of the coal business. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, December 7, 1895

No trace of the dead bodies. Coal will be shipped from No. 7 this month—Railroad Avenue death-trap closed

The main slope of the Oregon Improvement Company’s mine at Franklin, which has been closed since the recent disaster, has been opened to the sixth level, and before the end of the present month will be again in condition for the taking out of coal. (more…)

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Originally published in the BDHS Bulletin, Winter 2016

By William Kombol

PCC228

Loaded train in Franklin, 1902

The town of Franklin was developed for coal mining and operated as a company town from around 1885 to 1922. At its peak there were approximately 1,100 people living and working in Franklin. The town’s beginning and purpose were linked to 50-million-year-old coal seams exposed along the deep gorge cut through bedrock.

Explorers discovered the coal while traveling through the Green River Gorge in the early 1880s leading to the founding of nearby Black Diamond. The Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad was extended from Renton to Franklin in 1885 allowing coal production to commence and the town to develop. The town was named for the famed American patriot, Benjamin Franklin. (more…)

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Must come to the front – The trouble is off at Black Diamond – Negroes evacuating – All quiet at Gilman

Originally published in the Tacoma News, July 6, 1891

july 1891Black Diamond, Wash., July 6 – The situation here remains unchanged. Deputy J.W. Smart arrived from Seattle last night and is quartered with C company. He will make formal demand of the home guards to surrender their arms on the return of Woolery from Franklin later. (more…)

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The militia to disarm all belligerent parties

The “News” correspondent describes the true state of affairs at Gilman—No outbreak probable

Originally published in the Tacoma Daily News, July 3, 1891

State militiamen pose on what is now Issaquah’s East Sunset Way. The Bellevue Hotel is in the background of what was then called Gilman, after Daniel Gilman, who helped open King County’s resource-rich hinterlands to industrial development in the late 1880s by building the Seattle Lake Shore and Eastern Railroad. (<a href="http://www.seattletimes.com/pacific-nw-magazine/militiamen-in-issaquah-ca-1891/" target="_blank">Pacific NW Magazine</a>, June 15, 2012)

State militiamen pose on what is now Issaquah’s East Sunset Way. The Bellevue Hotel is in the background of what was then called Gilman, after Daniel Gilman, who helped open King County’s resource-rich hinterlands to industrial development in the late 1880s by building the Seattle Lake Shore and Eastern Railroad. (Pacific NW Magazine, June 15, 2012)

Troop B has been ordered to the front.

Yellow chevrons and clanking sabers glisten in the air.

An order was received by Captain Ashton today requiring him to report at Seattle tonight at 10 o’clock with his full command to await further orders.

An orderly rode about the streets this afternoon at breakneck speed notifying the members of the command to report at the armory at 6 p.m., not in full uniform but in heavy marching order, with blankets and full camp equipments.

Some members were inclined to be a little mutinous. They had no objections to being ordered to appear almost anywhere and everywhere in full uniform, but to be robbed of their glorious yellow pompoms—that smacked altogether too much of war. (more…)

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