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Posts Tagged ‘African-Americans’

Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, December 7, 1895

No trace of the dead bodies. Coal will be shipped from No. 7 this month—Railroad Avenue death-trap closed

The main slope of the Oregon Improvement Company’s mine at Franklin, which has been closed since the recent disaster, has been opened to the sixth level, and before the end of the present month will be again in condition for the taking out of coal. (more…)

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Originally published in the BDHS Bulletin, Winter 2016

By William Kombol

PCC228

Loaded train in Franklin, 1902

The town of Franklin was developed for coal mining and operated as a company town from around 1885 to 1922. At its peak there were approximately 1,100 people living and working in Franklin. The town’s beginning and purpose were linked to 50-million-year-old coal seams exposed along the deep gorge cut through bedrock.

Explorers discovered the coal while traveling through the Green River Gorge in the early 1880s leading to the founding of nearby Black Diamond. The Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad was extended from Renton to Franklin in 1885 allowing coal production to commence and the town to develop. The town was named for the famed American patriot, Benjamin Franklin. (more…)

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Must come to the front – The trouble is off at Black Diamond – Negroes evacuating – All quiet at Gilman

Originally published in the Tacoma News, July 6, 1891

july 1891Black Diamond, Wash., July 6 – The situation here remains unchanged. Deputy J.W. Smart arrived from Seattle last night and is quartered with C company. He will make formal demand of the home guards to surrender their arms on the return of Woolery from Franklin later. (more…)

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The militia to disarm all belligerent parties

The “News” correspondent describes the true state of affairs at Gilman—No outbreak probable

Originally published in the Tacoma Daily News, July 3, 1891

State militiamen pose on what is now Issaquah’s East Sunset Way. The Bellevue Hotel is in the background of what was then called Gilman, after Daniel Gilman, who helped open King County’s resource-rich hinterlands to industrial development in the late 1880s by building the Seattle Lake Shore and Eastern Railroad. (<a href="http://www.seattletimes.com/pacific-nw-magazine/militiamen-in-issaquah-ca-1891/" target="_blank">Pacific NW Magazine</a>, June 15, 2012)

State militiamen pose on what is now Issaquah’s East Sunset Way. The Bellevue Hotel is in the background of what was then called Gilman, after Daniel Gilman, who helped open King County’s resource-rich hinterlands to industrial development in the late 1880s by building the Seattle Lake Shore and Eastern Railroad. (Pacific NW Magazine, June 15, 2012)

Troop B has been ordered to the front.

Yellow chevrons and clanking sabers glisten in the air.

An order was received by Captain Ashton today requiring him to report at Seattle tonight at 10 o’clock with his full command to await further orders.

An orderly rode about the streets this afternoon at breakneck speed notifying the members of the command to report at the armory at 6 p.m., not in full uniform but in heavy marching order, with blankets and full camp equipments.

Some members were inclined to be a little mutinous. They had no objections to being ordered to appear almost anywhere and everywhere in full uniform, but to be robbed of their glorious yellow pompoms—that smacked altogether too much of war. (more…)

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Originally published in the Tacoma Daily News, July 1, 1891

Women driven into the forest to bear children—Men cruelly murdered

“News” special correspondent is arrested for crossing the line—First truthful account of the miner’s troubles at Franklin—The miners peaceable

By W.A. Ryan

Drawing of Franklin, circa 1887.

Drawing of Franklin, circa 1887.

Franklin, July 1—I arrived at Palmer Monday night at 6 o’clock. Palmer is a little station nestled at the crest of a hill in a deep forest, a little cluster of houses. Got more than half a dozen at most of which the chief is the depot.

Here I warned that five miners families from Franklin had arrived there early yesterday morning and had been sent to Carbonado for safety. Rumor had reached the place of a desperate encounter between the miners and the guards at this place and when I asked to be directed here I was warned that an attempt to enter the camp of the locked out miners or the dead lines established by the O. I. Company would result disastrously. (more…)

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Talks with the wounded: Details of Sunday’s tragedy as told by the participants—criminal carelessness

Originally published in the Tacoma Daily News, June 30, 1891

Franklin coal mines

Franklin coal mines

Franklin, Wash., June 30—The tragedy of Sunday is still the all-absorbing topic of conversation today, and though there has been no further violence the bitter feeling is still intense, and violence may occur again at any time.

It is asserted here that the death of Thomas Morris was simply an assassination, and that Edward J. Williams was murdered to get rid of an important witness. (more…)

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Many men wounded: The Franklin Mine troubles at last lead to bloodshed—more feared

Originally published in the Tacoma Daily News, June 29, 1891

july 1891Seattle, June 29—The first bloodshed of the mining troubles occurred at Franklin yesterday, and two companies of militia have been dispatched to the scene to prevent the race war which seems imminent.

The riot commenced early in the day, and was continued until late in the evening. At least one white man was killed and several other miners, including one Negro were wounded. (more…)

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