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Posts Tagged ‘Alaska’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, July 2, 1925

Eyes steady in the face of danger
Resourceful, true, a man of soldier-worth
Who braves, for loved ones’ peace and comfort
The dark, deep-delving trenches of the earth. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 25, 1925

Practically the entire populations of Newcastle, Burnett, Carbonado, Black Diamond, and Wilkeson joined in celebrating the first annual picnic given by the employees of the Pacific Coast Coal Company and allied companies at Fortuna Park last Sunday.

Music was plentifully dispensed throughout the day by the combined Newcastle and Black Diamond bands, numbering 40 pieces in all. Wilkeson, as special guests from the Wilkeson Coal Coke Co., came in more than 50 automobiles, each decorated with a distinctive sign. The ambulance was utilized as a supply wagon. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 2, 1925

Here may be nothing inspiring about the picture of a box car on the team track at Omak, Washington. But the significance of this scene lies in the fact that approximately seven thousand orchard heaters, designed to burn Diamond Briquets, were unloaded from that car last week.

These heaters are scattered throughout the orchards of the fertile Okanogan Valley, and in conjunction with the almost certain appearance of Jack Frost, will result in the consumption of hundreds of tons of briquets this spring where formerly briquets had never been seen. Similar shipments of orchard heaters have also recently been unloaded in the Yakima and Walla Walla fruit districts. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, March 17, 1929

George Watkin Evans is asked to solve problems of anthracite diggings for Pennsylvania firm

George Watkin Evans, Seattle mining engineer, chosen to make survey of Pennsylvania anthracite fields.

George Watkin Evans, Seattle mining engineer, chosen to make survey of Pennsylvania anthracite fields.

Industrial wise men of the East have reached into Seattle to capitalize the wealth of experience acquired by a grimy Welsh lad since he began at the age of 11 oiling coal cars in mines at Franklin.

The lad, now the eminent George Watkin Evans, consulting coal mining engineer, who can boast a number of college degrees and recognized mining achievements, has been selected to make a detailed study of the underground operations of the numerous anthracite mines of Philadelphia and Reading Coal and Iron Company, the largest anthracite coal company in the world.

Is recognition of Northwest

He was selected by A.J. Maloney, new president of the reorganized company, to devise better ways of mining. The face that a Seattle man was chosen when ordinarily the anthracite fields of Pennsylvania have supplied such talent is regarded by coal mining experts as recognition of the Pacific Northwest and tribute to Mr. Evans. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, February 26, 1925

Because of ill health Prof. M.M. Richardson, recently principal of the Newcastle Grade School, has resigned and is now taking a much needed rest. Succeeding him as principal is Mrs. R.R. Sterling, who for several years has taught the primary grades of the school.

Miss Winifred Butler, first at the left, teaches the third and fourth grades. Standing next to her is Mrs. Sterling, then Prof. Richardson and Mrs. Richardson, the latter being in charge of the fifth and sixth grades. The seventh and eighth grades are now being taught by Miss Grantham who will complete the retiring principal’s term. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Daily Times, February 24, 1929

Men who have made the new plant possible: 1—Wylie Hemphill, vice president and sales manager, and W.H. Green, plant manager. 2—Executives of cement company and affiliated companies. Left are, Carl English; purchasing agent; S.E. Hutton; research engineer; Thomas Reeder, assistant sales manager, Pacific Coast Coal Company; Walter Barnum, president Pacific Coast Company; E.F. De Grandpre, manager company hotels and real estate; E.C. Ward, vice president; Mr. Green; N.D. Moore, vice president; Ray Smith. engineer; H.M. Watkins, secretary and treasurer; A.F. Marion, manager steamship and engineering companies; W.A. Wilson, superintendent of mines; Darwin Meisnest, assistant sales manager cement company, and Mr. Hemphill. 3—Mr. Hemphill, Mr. Meisnest, and Ray Larson, Anchorage, Alaska, with latter signing order for first shipment to Alaska.

Men who have made the new plant possible: 1—Wylie Hemphill, vice president and sales manager, and W.H. Green, plant manager. 2—Executives of cement company and affiliated companies. Left are, Carl English, purchasing agent; S.E. Hutton, research engineer; Thomas Reeder, assistant sales manager, Pacific Coast Coal Company; Walter Barnum, president Pacific Coast Company; E.F. De Grandpre, manager company hotels and real estate; E.C. Ward, vice president; Mr. Green; N.D. Moore, vice president; Ray Smith. engineer; H.M. Watkins, secretary and treasurer; A.F. Marion, manager steamship and engineering companies; W.A. Wilson, superintendent of mines; Darwin Meisnest, assistant sales manager cement company, and Mr. Hemphill. 3—Mr. Hemphill, Mr. Meisnest, and Ray Larson, Anchorage, Alaska, with latter signing order for first shipment to Alaska.

First carload is sent on its way in record time

Gratifying accomplishment is recorded in ten months; Seattle leaders watch first shipment go

Rivaling the exploits of Aladdin’s genie, is the accomplishment of the officials of the Pacific Coast Cement Company, whose big, million-barrel capacity Portland cement plant made its first shipment of Diamond Cement last Friday, just ten months from the date that construction of the plant started on the twenty-acre site which it occupies on East Marginal Way. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, February 19, 1925

Tramways and aerial cables are common sights around metal mines, but it’s uncommon to find a coal mine with its entrance 450 feet below the level of the surrounding country. The above view shows the “incline” at Carbonado, a 35-degree pitch, down which all supplies and the daily shifts are lowered and raised.

Carbonado Comments

Carbonado victor in soccer battle

Battling the valiant Newcastle soccer eleven, the Carbonado squad last Sunday put up such a fight that the score ended 4 to 0, with the Carbon lads on the long end. Carbonado played a fast game.

Newcastle put up a fair defense, but with a number of new men, and also handicapped by a recent period of idleness, the Coal Creek team could make little headway against the strong Carbon defense. (more…)

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