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Posts Tagged ‘Alaska’

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 27, 1913

Official severs relations with Washington to accept important position with government

State coal mining inspector D.C. Botting to accept a more lucrative opening in the government service, has severed his connection as chief of the state coal mining inspection department, effective July 5. After that date he will accompany the government naval expedition to the Matanuska coal fields, where he will have charge as superintendent of the practical mining operations in the field.

Mr. Botting is the second Seattle man to be chosen for an important position in the party, George Watkin Evans, a coal expert of this city having previously been selected to accompany the party. Evans has already made one trip to the fields this summer. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 29, 1926

Expressing their genuine pleasure at the recent return home of N.D. Moore, vice-president of the Pacific Coast Coal Company, the Black Diamond Band last Saturday evening serenaded Mr. and Mrs. Moore at their home, 618 Fullerton Street, Seattle. The affair was a complete surprise to Mr. Moore, who knew nothing whatever about it until the music started. After a short concert on the lawn the boys were invited in and served with refreshments. Accompanying the band were Supt. Paul Gallagher, A.W. Gray, and Geo. Upton.

Those in the band included Bandmaster Frank Carroll, Earl Manchester, Ray Rosso, Wm. Tretheway, H. Parkinson, VanManchester, Ed Lockridge, Thos. Hughes, G. Lile, F. Heister, Jim Boyd, H. Saarella, B.M. McVicar, Ed. Crossman, Al Winckworth, Fred Carroll, B. McDonald, Theo. Rouse, and Tony Schultz. (more…)

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Originally published in “Now & Then,” The Seattle Times, March 26, 2000

By Paul Dorpat

At the foot of Dearborn Street, the Pacific Coast Company coal wharf extended far into Elliott Bay. Here, freshly painted and nearly new, the wharf is a year or two old. The scene dates from about 1903. (Courtesy of Lawton Gowey)

For soaring grandeur, the two towers of Pacific Coast Company’s coal wharf at the foot of Dearborn Street may be compared to the contemporary gantry cranes of the Port of Seattle’s Pier 46 complex. The open skeleton of the old coal towers suggests the stone filigree of a medieval cathedral, and the sublime symmetry strengthens this allusion.

Both the Cottage City and S.S. Garonne, the steamers left and right of the coal towers, had busy careers in Alaska. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, February 25, 1926

Members of the Washington State Press Association, in their fourteenth Annual Institute in Seattle, are to be the guests of the Pacific Coast Coal Company on Saturday, February 27. They will visit Newcastle, where they will make a trip into Primrose Tunnel, after which they will inspect the Briquet Plant on their return to Seattle. The Pacific Coast Coal Company welcomes this opportunity to greet the representatives of the press.

(more…)

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Originally published in the Kent News Journal, January 4, 1985

By Pat Jenkins
Staff Reporter

Move over, coal. Hydroelectricity wants to be the new industry on the block in Black Diamond.

It might never happen, but a proposal by private investors to build a hydroelectric generating plant near the Green River and put Black Diamond in the electricity business has the attention of officials in a city that’s famous for its coal-mining history. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, December 17, 1925

This isn’t a Santa Claus scene, though C.O. Hilen, manager of the Keithly Wood & Coal Co., the Pacific Coast Coal Company’s Everett branch, will probably expect old Kris Kringle to put in an appearance at the right time.

Mr. Hilen installed the fireplace in his office several months ago and the Camp Fire Girls of Everett participated in the ceremony of starting the first fire, the fuel for which was Diamond Briquets, of course. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Star, October 30, 1906

While famine is threatened in this city coal mine owners are first supplying the wants of San Francisco and Alaska—output also being curtailed

Seattle is threatened by a coal famine. Already prices of coal have been raised so that today Seattle householders are paying from $1 to $2 more per ton than they were two months ago. The excuse given for this raise is that there is today a shortage of coal.

To old customers coal dealers are suggesting that if they would not suffer later in the winter orders for a full season’s supply should be given at once. The Star has endeavored to discover the cause of this shortage and probable famine. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, October 8, 1925

Playing good, consistent ball throughout the entire season, the Black Diamond baseball team ended up with flying colors, the champions of the Pacific Coast Coal League for 1925. Saturday night, October 10, the team will celebrate the close of the season with a banquet at the hotel.

In the picture, left to right, front row—F.C. Bergmann, secretary of the club; Geo. Spencer, Johnny Buck, Pete Gallagher, mascot; Neil Andreson, Mike Naffer, H.J. Babb, manager; back row Geo. Allen, treasurer; Grover Kertis, captain: L. Pierotti, Joe Daley, E. Moon Mullen, S. Paxton, Lou LaFray, Joe Snorski, and Wm. Nicholson, president. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, October 1, 1925

Judges at the Southeastern Alaska Fair, held at Juneau, September 15 to 19, decided that the booth of the Pacific Coast Coal Company was entitled to first prize among the strictly merchant displays, and second prize out of all the exhibits at the fair. While the picture cannot reproduce the full attractiveness of the booth, it nevertheless shows that H.G. Walmsley, the Juneau manager for the Pacific Coast Coal Company, is an artist in combining an effective display of black and white. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, September 24, 1925

Though these men are not on jury duty no court could find a more impartial nor fair-minded group than the Black Diamond supervisors shown in the accompanying halftone. For confirmation of this statement just ask any miner or workman employed at the mine. The group, from left to right, includes, Jack Emmanuel, Richard Parry, Tom Edwards, E.D. Rockey, and Robt. Cruickshank. (more…)

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