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Posts Tagged ‘Army Corps of Engineers’

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, February 11, 1998

By Cecilia Nguyen

Due to the potential impact the Muckleshoot Reservation amphitheater will have on the City of Black Diamond’s traffic, a resolution requesting the Army Corps of Engineers perform an environmental impact study that includes traffic flow was unanimously passed during the January 5 Council meeting.

Along with City Planner Jason Paulsen, Councilman Geoff Bowie drafted a resolution that would petition the Army Corp of Engineers to study whether or not the construction of the amphitheater in Auburn would affect traffic and emergency response time in Black Diamond. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, February 3, 1959

HANSON DAMSITE: At Eagle Gorge, on the Green River, 30 miles southeast of Seattle, work started today on the long-planned Howard A. Hanson Dam. The broken line indicates where the crest of the dam will cross the narrow valley, creating a lake eight miles long and impounding 106,000 acre-feet of flood waters. Poring over maps indicating the area to be covered in excavation and subsequent construction were, from left, James J. Grafton, resident engineer for the Army Corps of Engineers, and two surveyors, Louis Zumek for the Army Engineers and Andrew McDermott for the Henry J. Kaiser Co. and Raymond International, joint contractors.

HANSON DAMSITE: At Eagle Gorge, on the Green River, 30 miles southeast of Seattle, work started today on the long-planned Howard A. Hanson Dam. The broken line indicates where the crest of the dam will cross the narrow valley, creating a lake eight miles long and impounding 106,000 acre-feet of flood waters. Poring over maps indicating the area to be covered in excavation and subsequent construction were, from left, James J. Grafton, resident engineer for the Army Corps of Engineers, and two surveyors, Louis Zumek for the Army Engineers and Andrew McDermott for the Henry J. Kaiser Co. and Raymond International, joint contractors.

The final step in a long-deferred flood-control project, construction of the Howard A. Hanson Dam on Green River, got under way today.

Dean H. Eastman, president of the Seattle Chamber of Commerce and vice president of the Northern Pacific Railway Co., threw a switch setting off a blast of dynamite. L. Costello, member of a civic committee organized by the late Mr. Hanson to urge dam construction, moved the first shovelful of earth. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, April 18, 1979

By Teresa Hensley

Circled above is the low area in the right abutment of the masonry dam.

Circled above is the low area in the right abutment of the masonry dam.

“There is no imminent danger, and people should not be alarmed,” said Colonel John A. Poteat, the Army Corps Seattle District Engineer, in a press release last week from Seattle City Light about the masonry dam above the Cedar River.

In an earlier press conference it was revealed that the dam could prove unsafe in the event of a major flood.

Conditions which could trigger such an emergency—described as “a flood on top of a flood” by Joe Recchi, acting superintendent of City Light—have never been approached in the 75 years of the project. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, April 21, 1976

City of Seattle’s Masonry Dam on the Cedar River.

City of Seattle’s Masonry Dam on the Cedar River.

Only a crash program could replace the valve in the upper Cedar River Morse Dam this summer, committee members of the Cedar River Homeowners Protective Association were told by Seattle City Light and Water Department engineers at a meeting here last week.

The valve could provide some flood control by allowing an escapement of 500 cfs (cubic feet per second) under any head of water. The valve currently in use is a friction type with metal-to-metal contact. It leaks and can be operated only when the water level is low. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, January 27, 1957

By Lucile McDonald

An almost forgotten structure on the White River is shown in part in the Page 1 color illustration of today’s Magazine Section. It is a drift barrier of concrete piers and cables, built some 40 years ago in an effort to prevent driftwood jams and control floods. The barrier is in the Muckleshoot Reservation, southeast of Auburn. It is reached by way of a road between Newaukum and the Academy District.

An almost forgotten structure on the White River is shown in part in the Page 1 color illustration of today’s Magazine Section. It is a drift barrier of concrete piers and cables, built some 40 years ago in an effort to prevent driftwood jams and control floods. The barrier is in the Muckleshoot Reservation, southeast of Auburn. It is reached by way of a road between Newaukum and the Academy District.

Washington has a river which nobody wanted … the White.

Today the White River’s waters pour into Puget Sound through a channel 20 miles shorter than the one it followed for untold centuries.

Until 1906 the stream flowed northward into the Green River, thence to the Duwamish and the “salt chuck.” Today it empties into the Puyallup, at Sumner, by way of the Stuck—a river which, technically speaking, has disappeared, although its name still is used by Auburn residents and appears on a state-highway bridge.

All of these rivers were once parts of the same great basin, its fingers extending into the mountain valleys. The land, built up by glacial action, eroded easily and the stream channels, made when the area was emerging from the sea, were unstable and sinuous. In flood seasons they sprawled out of banks.

The White River, with its deep mountain canyon and drift jams, was especially menacing and farmers had no love for it. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, June 13, 1948

Army engineers finish valve system

By Fergus Hoffman

Penstock valves: Like the glowering mouths of naval guns, the polished valves of Mud Mountain’s three 8-foot penstocks jut from beneath the control tower built into the solid rock of the outlet gorge. The penstocks, one on top and two below, are carried in, a 2,000-foot-long tunnel which is rammed straight through the solid mountain rock beside the dam. When this picture was made, only one of the three valves was open, jutting its terrific force against the canyon wall. (U. S. Army Corps or Engineers photo by R. A. Lee.)

Like the glowering mouths of naval guns, the polished valves of Mud Mountain’s three 8-foot penstocks jut from beneath the control tower built into the solid rock of the outlet gorge. The penstocks, one on top and two below, are carried in, a 2,000-foot-long tunnel which is rammed straight through the solid mountain rock beside the dam. When this picture was made, only one of the three valves was open, jutting its terrific force against the canyon wall. (U. S. Army Corps of Engineers photo by R. A. Lee.)

MUD MOUNTAIN DAM, June 12.—Like a thousand crystal geysers rocketing into canyon sunlight from a 2,000-foot torpedo tube, the White River is earning its name today.

Thunderously white, spurting and spraying against the cliffs of a narrow gorge with-rock-polishing force, the White River has been tamed by Mud Mountain Dam, but the taming has dramatized the hitherto prosaic mountain stream which once posed an annual flood threat to the downstream valley.

Now, after 10 years of work and 12 million dollars in financing, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has control of the river, this last step due to completion this week of the valve system.

Only one valve, controlling one of the three eight-foot penstocks—or pipes, is open. (more…)

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